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Introduction

Adverbs

Adverbs are words used to describe or modify verbs.


Adverbs give more information about a verb.
 

Adverbs tell us in what way someone does something. Adverbs can modify not only verbs, but also adjectives or other adverbs.

Use adverbs to make your writing more interesting.

Here are some examples:

 

Describe the Man's Actions:

He's working quickly.
 

He's working carefully.
 

He's working slowly.
 

He's working hard.
 

He's working fast.
 

He's working hurriedly.

"Quickly, carefully, slowly, hard, fast, hurriedly" are all adverbs.
Frank worked more yesterday. (WHEN)
 

Steve works here . (WHERE)
 

They work well together. (HOW)

  Adverbs give information about the time, place and manner of the action.

ADJECTIVE

ADVERB

  Most adverbs have -ly at the end.
new newly

quick

quickly

happy

happily

careful

carefully

hard

hard   Some adverbs are irregular.
fast fast

Quickly, he finished his work.
 

He quickly finished his work.

 

He finished his work quickly.

  Adverbs have many possible positions within a sentence.
Frank works more quickly than Steve.
 

Steve works more carefully than Frank.
 

Which worker works more efficiently?

  Adverbs can be used to compare actions.
Paul is a very good worker.
 

Sandy is frequently busy.
 

Our teacher is always patient with us.

  Adverbs can be used to modify adjectives.

Paul went to the store, then he went to the post office.

I should have studied; instead, I went to a movie.


 

I have no money; I'd go with you otherwise.

I think, therefore I am.

 

 

Adverbs can be used to join two clauses together. 

These adverbs are called conjunctive adverbs.

 

Some of the most common conjunctive adverbs are:

also, consequently, finally, furthermore, hence, however, incidentally, indeed, instead, likewise, meanwhile, nevertheless, next, nonetheless, otherwise, still, then, therefore, thus

 

 

Types of Adverbs

1) Adverbs of manner

quickly

kindly

 

2) Adverbs of degree

very

rather

 

3) Adverbs of frequency

often

sometimes

 

4) Adverbs of time

now

today

 

5) Adverbs of place

here

nowhere


 

Comparison of adverbs

There are three forms:

  • positive
  • comparative
  • superlative

A - Comparison with -er/-est
 

hard - harder - (the) hardest
 

We use -er/-est with the following adverbs:
 

1) all adverbs with one syllable
 

fast

faster

fastest

high

higher

highest


2) The adverb: early
 

B - Comparison with more - most
 

carefully - more carefully - (the) most carefully
 

adverbs ending on -ly (not: early)
 

C - Irregular adverbs
 

well

better

best

badly

worse

worst

much

more

most

little

less

least

late

later

last

far

farther
further

farthest
furthest


How to recognize an adverb
 

Many adverbs end with the suffix -LY. Most of these are created by adding -LY to the end of an adjective, like this:

 

Adjective Adverb
Slow slowly
Delightful delightfully
Hopeless hopelessly
Aggressive aggressively


         


 

 



However, this is NOT a reliable way to find out whether a word is an adverb or not, for two reasons:

many adverbs do NOT end in -LY (some are the same as the adjective form), and many words which are NOT adverbs

DO end in -LY (such as kindly, friendly, elderly and lonely, which are adjectives). Here are some examples of adverbs which are the same as adjectives:

 

Adjective Adverb  
Fast fast
Late late
Early early


The best way to tell if a word is an adverb is to try making a question, for which the answer is the word. If the question uses how, where or when, then the word is probably an adverb.
 

  Word in context Question Adverb?

Junko plays tennis aggressively. How does Junko play tennis? Yes -- uses HOW.

They have a small house. What kind of house do they have?

No -- uses WHAT KIND OF, so this is an adjective.

Matthew called the police immediately. When did Matthew call the police? Yes -- uses WHEN.




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