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Problem-5 (Multi-Source)

The results of performance tests at the standard height of 18,000 feet and the general stats of different planes are shown in the table below.
 

Tab 1:

True Speed

(in miles per hour)

Tab 2:

Specific Aviation Turbine Fuel Consumption

(seat-miles per US gallons)

Tab 3:

Tank Capacity

(in US gallons)

Tab 4:

Seating Capacity

(in number of seats)

 

Plane Model

Performance

(in miles per hour)

A-19A

345.5

B-47A

234.3

C-37B

115.3

D-49P

322.8

E-89G

655.3

 

Plane Model

Performance

(seat-mile per US gallon)

A-19A

7.32

B-47A

3.89

C-37B

24.8

D-49P

49.9

E-89G

32.9

 

Plane Model

Size

(in US gallons)

A-19A

200

B-47A

300

C-47B

120

D-49P

158

E-89G

258

 

Plane Model

Size

(in seats)

A-19A

38

B-47A

48

C-47B

120

D-49P

198

E-89G

122

  1. Which plane is best suited for long distance travel, and which planes are best suited for short distance economy flight?
Best suited for long distance travel Best suited for short distance economy flight Plane model
A-19A
B-47A
C-37B
D-49P
E-89G
  1. The Seat-miles is improved in the D-49A version over C-37B by combo percentage.

Solution-5 (Multi-Source)

  1. The formula for distance is
D = RT
 
Based on the given information, the best short distance economy flight would be the one that gives the maximum economy, that is, Seat-distance/Fuel because long distance is only an added feature. Even if you have a long distance plane that gives you better economy you have to choose the best short distance economy flight.
 
Based on the available information, the equation for economy here would be
 
The Seat-distance/fuel = maximum for the Plane D-49P
 
Next,
 
Specific Aviation Turbine Fuel Consumption (US gallons per seat-mile) x Tank Capacity gives seat-miles
 
Dividing Seat-miles into the number of seats (Clue: Seats x Miles/Seats = Miles) gives the distance.
 
Let's do some rough calculation below.
 
Plane Model
Specific Aviation Turbine Fuel Consumption (US gallons per seat-mile) x Tank Capacity gives Seat-miles
 
Seat-miles divided by number of Seats gives Distance.
A-19A
7.32 Seat-miles per US gallon x 200 US gallons divided by 38 Seats = 38.5 miles
B-47A
3.89 Seat-miles per US gallon x 300 US gallons divided by 48 Seats = 24.31 miles
C-37B
24.89 Seat-miles per US gallon x 120 US gallons divided 120 Seats = 24.89 miles
D-49P
49.9 Seat-miles per US gallon x 158 US gallons divided by 198 Seats = 39.8 miles
E-89G
32.9 Seat-miles per US gallon x 258 US gallons divided by 122 Seats = 69 miles

The numbers 24.31 and 24.89 are close to each other, so the calculation has to be done to include more digits. But 69 is far from any other numbers listed, so 69 is a good enough approximation. Similarly we need to round 38.5 and 39.8 to one decimal digit.

 
The calculations above are not difficult on the exam because you have a calculator.
 
E-89G has the biggest value, so the answer must look like
 
Most suited for long distance travel Most suited for short distance economy flight Plane Model
A-19A
B-47A
C-37B
D-49P
E-89G
  1. Seat-miles = Seat-miles per volume x volume =
Seat-miles per US gallons x Number of US gallons in tank =
 

Plane Model

Specific Aviation Turbine Fuel Consumption (US gallons per seat-mile) x Tank capacity gives seat-miles x Seat-Miles into number of seats gives the distance.

C-37B

24.8 Seat-miles per US gallon x 120 US gallons = 2976 Seat-miles

D-49P

49.9 Seat-miles per US gallon x 158 US gallons = 7884.2 Seat-miles


The required percentage is
 
(New – old)/old = (7884.2 – 2976)/2976 x 100 ≈ 165%

Choose the answer appropriately.

 
Note: In this problem, Tab 1 is redundant. On the test, you may be given redundant data. Remember that data sufficiency type problems are possible in Integrated Reasoning.

Also, notice that the tables in the tabs can be joined (protocol) into a single table like below with the plane model as the link.

 

Plane Model

Performance

(in miles per hour)

Performance

(seat-mile per US gallon)

Size

(in US gallons)

Size

(in seats)

A-19A

345.5

7.32

200

38

B-47A

234.3

3.89

300

48

C-37B

115.3

24.8

120

120

D-49P

322.8

49.9

158

198

E-89G

655.3

32.9

258

122


Hence, this problem reduces to a single table problem. The GMAT can split an existing model and ask you to integrate the sub-models into a super model again.




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