Loading....
Coupon Accepted Successfully!

 

Graphical Interpretation-Understanding Protocol

Data can come from graphics.
 
For example, bar graphs, line graphs, scatterplots, and bubble graphs. The goal here is to interpret what is graphically displayed in the diagram. The graphs generally represent different dimensions of the data.
 
For example, you can map the date on an axis, say, the x-axis, the production on the y-axis, and at the same time, the market price, along a separate axis, say, the z-axis, or along the xy-plot so that you can analyze all angles of your business in a single chart.
 
Evaluating the slope of a line graph is usually important with graphs. Negative slope indicates decrease along the x-axis, and positive slope indicates increase along the x-axis.
 
Example (A Problem on the Integration of Graphics):

The graphs below provide data from an entrance examination conducted in different years.


 

 
Note: The dimensions of the problem are the Exam, ‘D’-level (Difficulty level), Number of Questions, and Average Time Per Question.

 

The first and the second graphics can be linked (integrated) using the links Exam and the Number of Questions. The integrated view of the first two graphics can be combined into the third graphic using the link “Exam” again.
 
In this year, the test takers were given the least time to answer all the questions The exam was least difficult in these two years  
CEE 2000
CEE 2001
CEE 2003
CEE 2005
CEE 2006
Refer to the graph CEE Exam Difficulty Level. The graph starts at 0 for each exam and ends at 10 for the most difficult exam, CEE 2000. So, the difficulty actually increases with ‘D-level’ value. The second highest value corresponds to Exam CEE 2001.
 
The total time given can be calculated as
 
(Number of Questions) × (Time Per Question)
 
Both the number of questions and the time given per question are least in 2006. Hence, their product should be minimum in that year and therefore the total time given is least in 2006.
 
Your selections should look like this
 
In this year, the test takers were given the least time to answer all the questions The exam was least difficult in these two years CEE
CEE 2000
CEE 2001
CEE 2003
CEE 2005
CEE 2006
 
Question

If the Pressure Factor for the examinees is defined as Difficulty Level divided by Average Time (in minutes) given per question, then the Pressure Factor for CEE 2006 equals

 

Description: 123

 

And if the Stress Factor for the examinees is defined as the product of the Difficulty Level and the Number of Questions divided by the Average Time given per question, then the Stress Factor for CEE 2005 is

 

Description: 123

 
Solution

The Pressure Factor in 2006 equals

(Difficulty Level) ÷ (Average Time given per question) =

 

5/40 seconds or 5/(2/3 minutes) =

 

15/2 per minute

The answer is 7.5 from the drop-down menu.

The Stress Factor in 2005 equals


 

6 per second

 

The answer is 6 per second from the drop-down menu.

 

Note: The same problem can be asked as follows:

 

Integrate the graphic(s) below with the table(s) below:
 
The graphs below provide data from an entrance examination conducted in different years.
 

 

EXAM

Time Per Question (in seconds)

DIFFICULTY LEVEL

CEE 2000

55

10

CEE 2001

52

8

CEE 2002

50

7

CEE 2003

48

7

CEE 2004

46

6

CEE 2005

42

6

CEE 2006

40

5





Test Your Skills Now!
Take a Quiz now
Reviewer Name