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Get Your Conjunctions Right

 

THAN
Adjectives and adverbs in the comparative degree are followed by the conjunction ‘than’.

 

THAT
As a conjunction, ‘that’ cannot be used in or as:
(i) A sentence in direct narration.
(ii) An interrogative adverb or interrogative pronoun in the direct narrative.

For example:
1. Incorrect: He said that, “I have lost everything in this contest.”
Correct: He said, “I have lost everything in this contest.”

 

2. Incorrect: He asked that why you went there.
Correct: He asked why you went there.

 

3. Incorrect: I want to know that how much you have spent so far.
Correct: I want to know how much you have spent so far.

 

SINCE
Whenever ‘since’ is used as a conjunction in the sense of ‘from’ or ‘after’ it should be preceded by a verb in the present perfect tense and followed by a verb in the past indefinite tense.

1. Incorrect: Many rules changes since I had left.

Correct: Many rules have changed since I left.

 

2. Incorrect: A week passed since I have been contacting you.
Correct: A week has passed since I tried to contact you.

 

UNLESS, IF
Unless means ‘if not’, so it should not be followed by ‘not’.
Incorrect: Unless you do not meet him, he will do nothing for you.
Correct: Unless you meet him, he will do nothing for you.

 

LEST
Two corrections are connected with the conjunction ‘lest’.

 

1. Incorrect: Learn properly lest you should not forget.
Correct: Learn properly lest you should forget.

 

2. Incorrect: Remove the lid lest it would be blown off.
Correct: Remove the lid lest it should be blown off.

 

LIKE-AS
‘like’ is placed before nouns in the simpler type of comparison. But if the noun is followed by a verb, i.e., if there is a clause of comparison, ‘as’ is used.


(i) He fought like a brave man.


(ii) When in Rome, do as the Roman do. 

 

BOTH-AND
‘both’ should not be used with ‘as well as’ because both the words mean the same thing; ‘and’ should be used instead.
Incorrect: Both Rajiv as well as I took part in this debate.
Correct: Both Rajiv and I took part in this debate.

 

ALTHOUGH/THOUGH-YET
‘although’ should be followed by ‘yet’ or a comma.
Incorrect: Although he is rich, but he is greedy.
Correct: Although he rich, yet he is greedy.

 

AS-AS
‘as – as’ is used for comparison in affirmative sentences.
Incorrect: He is good at tennis as his brother.
Correct: He is as good at tennis as his brother.

 

SO – AS
‘so – as’ is used in negative sentences and for comparison.
Incorrect: This pen is so good as that one.
Correct: This pen is as good as that one.

 

SO – THAT
Incorrect: He played for long that he was exhausted.
Correct: He played for so long that he was exhausted. 

 

SUCH – AS
Incorrect: There is no such thing which you are mentioning.
Correct: There is no such thing as you are mentioning.

 

SUCH – THAT
When ‘such’ is used for emphasis, it should be followed by ‘that’.
Incorrect: Such was his pride, as he was not prepared to listen to anyone.
Correct: Such was his pride that he was not prepared to listen to anyone.

 

NOT ONLY – BUT ALSO
(i) The verb should agree with the noun.
(ii) ‘not only’ and ‘but also’ should follow the verb.
(iii) The part to be emphasized comes after ‘but also’.

1. Incorrect: Not only he but his friends also has responded to may call.
Correct: Non only he but his friends also have responded to my call.


2. Incorrect: He is not only known for his bravery but also for his goodness.
Correct: He is known not only for his bravery but also for his goodness.

 

SCARCELY – WHEN
‘scarcely’ should be followed by ‘when’ and not by ‘than’, ‘then’, ‘but’, etc.
Incorrect: He had scarcely initiated the debate then the members walked out.

 

HARDLY – WHEN (BEFORE)
With ‘hardly’ we can use only ‘when’ or ‘before’.
Incorrect: He had hardly come then he was asked to go back.
Correct: He had hardly come before (when) he was asked to go back.

 

NO SOONER – THAN
(i) As an adverb it must be followed by the verb ‘did’ or ‘had’.
(ii) Being in the comparative degree, it should be followed by ‘than’.

 

1. Incorrect: No sooner he came than I left the place.
Correct: No sooner did he come than I left the place.

 

2. Incorrect: No sooner did he come when I sent for him.
Correct: No sooner did he come than I sent for him.

 

NO OTHER – THAN
Incorrect: He has no other business but backbiting.
Correct: He has no other business than backbiting.

 

NOTHING ELSE – BUT
Incorrect: It is nothing else than hypocrisy.
Correct: It is nothing else but hypocrisy.

 

WHETHER – OR
Incorrect: Whether you will pass, I do not know.
Correct: Whether you will pass or not, I do not know.





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