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Para Jumbles
 
Para-jumbles are (PJs) routinely seen nowadays in most of the English sections, PJs are similar to Reading Comprehension (RC) in many ways. Ideally, PJs should be attempted either before reading the RC or after reading the RC – however, this is left to the individual choice of the candidate.
 
Question Structure
See example below:
 
Directions—(Q. 1–5) Rearrange the following six sentences (1), (2), (3), (4), (5) and (6) in the proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph; then answer the questions given below them.
 
  1. The able bodied men of the tribe gathered to discuss how to climb the mountain.
  2. As part of their plundering they kidnapped a baby of one of the families.
  3. One day the mountain tribe invaded those living in the valley.
  4. “We couldn’t climb the mountain. How could you?”, they asked, “It wasn’t your baby !” she replied.
  5. There were two tribes in the Andes–one lived in the valley and the other high up in the mountains.
  6. Two days later they noticed the child’s mother coming down the mountain that they hadn’t yet figured out how to climb.  
How to Solve?
 
The most basic step is to re-arrange the sentences into a logical sequence. You can arrange these sentences easily by using some common sense and logic of elimination.
 
A.  Read all the sentences
 
Before attempting to solve the questions you must read all these sentences to get a basic idea of the paragraph which has to be constructed
 
 
Identify the opening Sentence
 
The Opening Sentence is usually the easiest to identify as it introduces a topic (in 5-10% of the questions this may not be the case but generally it is), let’s take the above example:
 
Sentence 1 cannot be the opening sentence because it talks about some men and some tribes without any information about any of them, Similarly sentence 2 cannot be the opening sentence.
 
Sentence 3 has the potential to be the opening sentence, so keep it aside for the time being and look at the others. Similarly Sentence 5 also has the potential to be the opening sentence.
 
So now your choice is now restricted to sentence 3 and sentence 5 to determine the opening sentence. On careful examination of the sentences you will see that sentence 5 fits the appropriately into the opening sentence.
 
 
Identify concluding sentences.

If you find a sentence which sums up an idea or comes to a conclusion, this is likely to be a concluding sentence. In certain cases though, paragraphs have conclusions at the beginning and the arguments are explained later
 
Look for connecting sentences and build “sentence pairs”
You will usually find sentences, which you know for certain, connect with each other. You can then build “sentence pairs” to complete the paragraphs.
 
1. Which of the following should be the SECOND sentence after rearrangement?
(A) (1)
(B) (2)
(C) (3)
(D) (4)
(E) (5)
 
2. Which of the following should be the FIFTH sentence after rearrangement?
(A) (6)
(B) (5)
(C) (4)
(D) (3)
(E) (2)
 
3. Which of the following should be the FIRST sentence after rearrangement?
(A) (1)                    
(B) (2)                    
(C) (3)                    
(D) (4)                    
(E) (5)
 
4. Which of the following should be the SIXTH (LAST) sentence after rearrangement?
(A) (1)                    
(B) (2)                    
(C) (3)                    
(D) (4)                    
(E) (5)
 
5. Which of the following should be the THIRD sentence after rearrangement?
(A) (1)
(B) (2)
(C) (3)
(D) (4)
(E) (5)
 
Answers –
Q1 – Ans C
Q2 – Ans A
Q3 – Ans E
Q4 – Ans D
Q5 – Ans B




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