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Practice Test-5

Question
11 out of 60
 

Read the following passage and answer the questions.

Today, the educational value appealing to the eye as well as to the ear has been fully recognised, and the lack of suitable materials which has in the past been a handicap to visual education is being made good. The exhibition is one important medium for visual education that has gained greatly in popularity of recent years. Exhibitions may range in subject from the purely practical-such as those collections of artistic and historical interest like those circulated by the Victoria and Albert Museum. A natural focus for this particular form of education through the eye is the local museum. Museums and galleries are, indeed, playing an increasingly important part in the educational life of their localities; and possibly their greatest contribution can be made in the field of adult education. If they are valuable as a base for the display of material supplied from outside sources, they have a more important function of fostering local distinctions and tradition of all kinds. This they can do by their permanent collections, by special exhibitions circulated to other centres in the locality, for example, to colleges of further education or to community centres. An outstanding value of the exhibition method is that it does not provide instruction only, but by the display of works of craftsmanship and art it gives a training in appreciation, a sense of quality and individual character.

Another most important medium for visual education is the cine-film and at the present time the supply of specially produced educational films is being rapidly increased. The film, like the exhibition, is well adapted for demonstration of practical activities and skills of all kinds, and to the communication of cultural ideas and values. But it has a further distinctive contribution of particular importance in education. Owing to the exceptionally strong emotional impact of the cinema, films dealing with controversial topics - as, for example, the whole range of modern social questions - can be relied upon to provoke discussion and arouse interest in current problems. There are now a number of sources for educational films.

Mention should also be made of the humbler filmstrip, which consists of a series of pictures printed on lengths of cine film and projected like miniature lantern slides. Being cheap and easily handled, they are an ideal means for illustrating informal demonstrations and lectures. These are already obtainable for a wide range of subjects from several commercial producers, and are likely to be supplied in increasing number from public sources. For those who still prefer the ordinary lantern slide, the largest and most accessible public collection is that of the Victoria and Albert Museum.


Exhibition is an important medium:



A For the purpose of educational advancement

B For its appeal to our eyes

C For it has found its relevance in modern society

D Because it is the most practical way to educate people

Ans. A

Practice Test-5 Flashcard List

60 flashcards
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Read the following passage and answer the questions. Today, the educational value appealing to the eye as well as to the ear has been fully recognised, and the lack of suitable materials which has in the past been a handicap to visual education is being made good. The exhibition is one important medium for visual education that has gained greatly in popularity of recent years. Exhibitions may range in subject from the purely practical-such as those collections of artistic and historical interest like those circulated by the Victoria and Albert Museum. A natural focus for this particular form of education through the eye is the local museum. Museums and galleries are, indeed, playing an increasingly important part in the educational life of their localities; and possibly their greatest contribution can be made in the field of adult education. If they are valuable as a base for the display of material supplied from outside sources, they have a more important function of fostering local distinctions and tradition of all kinds. This they can do by their permanent collections, by special exhibitions circulated to other centres in the locality, for example, to colleges of further education or to community centres. An outstanding value of the exhibition method is that it does not provide instruction only, but by the display of works of craftsmanship and art it gives a training in appreciation, a sense of quality and individual character. Another most important medium for visual education is the cine-film and at the present time the supply of specially produced educational films is being rapidly increased. The film, like the exhibition, is well adapted for demonstration of practical activities and skills of all kinds, and to the communication of cultural ideas and values. But it has a further distinctive contribution of particular importance in education. Owing to the exceptionally strong emotional impact of the cinema, films dealing with controversial topics - as, for example, the whole range of modern social questions - can be relied upon to provoke discussion and arouse interest in current problems. There are now a number of sources for educational films. Mention should also be made of the humbler filmstrip, which consists of a series of pictures printed on lengths of cine film and projected like miniature lantern slides. Being cheap and easily handled, they are an ideal means for illustrating informal demonstrations and lectures. These are already obtainable for a wide range of subjects from several commercial producers, and are likely to be supplied in increasing number from public sources. For those who still prefer the ordinary lantern slide, the largest and most accessible public collection is that of the Victoria and Albert Museum. Exhibition is an important medium: A For the purpose of educational advancement B For its appeal to our eyes C For it has found its relevance in modern society D Because it is the most practical way to educate people
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Read the following passage and answer the questions. Today, the educational value appealing to the eye as well as to the ear has been fully recognised, and the lack of suitable materials which has in the past been a handicap to visual education is being made good. The exhibition is one important medium for visual education that has gained greatly in popularity of recent years. Exhibitions may range in subject from the purely practical-such as those collections of artistic and historical interest like those circulated by the Victoria and Albert Museum. A natural focus for this particular form of education through the eye is the local museum. Museums and galleries are, indeed, playing an increasingly important part in the educational life of their localities; and possibly their greatest contribution can be made in the field of adult education. If they are valuable as a base for the display of material supplied from outside sources, they have a more important function of fostering local distinctions and tradition of all kinds. This they can do by their permanent collections, by special exhibitions circulated to other centres in the locality, for example, to colleges of further education or to community centres. An outstanding value of the exhibition method is that it does not provide instruction only, but by the display of works of craftsmanship and art it gives a training in appreciation, a sense of quality and individual character. Another most important medium for visual education is the cine-film and at the present time the supply of specially produced educational films is being rapidly increased. The film, like the exhibition, is well adapted for demonstration of practical activities and skills of all kinds, and to the communication of cultural ideas and values. But it has a further distinctive contribution of particular importance in education. Owing to the exceptionally strong emotional impact of the cinema, films dealing with controversial topics - as, for example, the whole range of modern social questions - can be relied upon to provoke discussion and arouse interest in current problems. There are now a number of sources for educational films. Mention should also be made of the humbler filmstrip, which consists of a series of pictures printed on lengths of cine film and projected like miniature lantern slides. Being cheap and easily handled, they are an ideal means for illustrating informal demonstrations and lectures. These are already obtainable for a wide range of subjects from several commercial producers, and are likely to be supplied in increasing number from public sources. For those who still prefer the ordinary lantern slide, the largest and most accessible public collection is that of the Victoria and Albert Museum. The potentiality of museums and galleries : A Lies in its entertainment aspects B Lies in its educational aspects C Lies in its capacity to draw the people closer to the activity D Lies in its capacity to uphold adult education
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Read the following passage and answer the questions. Today, the educational value appealing to the eye as well as to the ear has been fully recognised, and the lack of suitable materials which has in the past been a handicap to visual education is being made good. The exhibition is one important medium for visual education that has gained greatly in popularity of recent years. Exhibitions may range in subject from the purely practical-such as those collections of artistic and historical interest like those circulated by the Victoria and Albert Museum. A natural focus for this particular form of education through the eye is the local museum. Museums and galleries are, indeed, playing an increasingly important part in the educational life of their localities; and possibly their greatest contribution can be made in the field of adult education. If they are valuable as a base for the display of material supplied from outside sources, they have a more important function of fostering local distinctions and tradition of all kinds. This they can do by their permanent collections, by special exhibitions circulated to other centres in the locality, for example, to colleges of further education or to community centres. An outstanding value of the exhibition method is that it does not provide instruction only, but by the display of works of craftsmanship and art it gives a training in appreciation, a sense of quality and individual character. Another most important medium for visual education is the cine-film and at the present time the supply of specially produced educational films is being rapidly increased. The film, like the exhibition, is well adapted for demonstration of practical activities and skills of all kinds, and to the communication of cultural ideas and values. But it has a further distinctive contribution of particular importance in education. Owing to the exceptionally strong emotional impact of the cinema, films dealing with controversial topics - as, for example, the whole range of modern social questions - can be relied upon to provoke discussion and arouse interest in current problems. There are now a number of sources for educational films. Mention should also be made of the humbler filmstrip, which consists of a series of pictures printed on lengths of cine film and projected like miniature lantern slides. Being cheap and easily handled, they are an ideal means for illustrating informal demonstrations and lectures. These are already obtainable for a wide range of subjects from several commercial producers, and are likely to be supplied in increasing number from public sources. For those who still prefer the ordinary lantern slide, the largest and most accessible public collection is that of the Victoria and Albert Museum. The exhibition method is outstanding : A Because it blends fun with education B Because it can be held in various localities C Because people’s interaction will increase D Because it administers a sort of practical training
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Read the following passage and answer the questions. Today, the educational value appealing to the eye as well as to the ear has been fully recognised, and the lack of suitable materials which has in the past been a handicap to visual education is being made good. The exhibition is one important medium for visual education that has gained greatly in popularity of recent years. Exhibitions may range in subject from the purely practical-such as those collections of artistic and historical interest like those circulated by the Victoria and Albert Museum. A natural focus for this particular form of education through the eye is the local museum. Museums and galleries are, indeed, playing an increasingly important part in the educational life of their localities; and possibly their greatest contribution can be made in the field of adult education. If they are valuable as a base for the display of material supplied from outside sources, they have a more important function of fostering local distinctions and tradition of all kinds. This they can do by their permanent collections, by special exhibitions circulated to other centres in the locality, for example, to colleges of further education or to community centres. An outstanding value of the exhibition method is that it does not provide instruction only, but by the display of works of craftsmanship and art it gives a training in appreciation, a sense of quality and individual character. Another most important medium for visual education is the cine-film and at the present time the supply of specially produced educational films is being rapidly increased. The film, like the exhibition, is well adapted for demonstration of practical activities and skills of all kinds, and to the communication of cultural ideas and values. But it has a further distinctive contribution of particular importance in education. Owing to the exceptionally strong emotional impact of the cinema, films dealing with controversial topics - as, for example, the whole range of modern social questions - can be relied upon to provoke discussion and arouse interest in current problems. There are now a number of sources for educational films. Mention should also be made of the humbler filmstrip, which consists of a series of pictures printed on lengths of cine film and projected like miniature lantern slides. Being cheap and easily handled, they are an ideal means for illustrating informal demonstrations and lectures. These are already obtainable for a wide range of subjects from several commercial producers, and are likely to be supplied in increasing number from public sources. For those who still prefer the ordinary lantern slide, the largest and most accessible public collection is that of the Victoria and Albert Museum. The author is of the opinion that the cine-film is another most important visual education : A Because it displays practical activities against the background of various cultural heritages B Because it appeals to our emotional faculty creating a long lasting impact C Because it is welcomed as the most convenient medium to educate people D Because people are naturally inclined to watch it
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Read the following passage and answer the questions. Today, the educational value appealing to the eye as well as to the ear has been fully recognised, and the lack of suitable materials which has in the past been a handicap to visual education is being made good. The exhibition is one important medium for visual education that has gained greatly in popularity of recent years. Exhibitions may range in subject from the purely practical-such as those collections of artistic and historical interest like those circulated by the Victoria and Albert Museum. A natural focus for this particular form of education through the eye is the local museum. Museums and galleries are, indeed, playing an increasingly important part in the educational life of their localities; and possibly their greatest contribution can be made in the field of adult education. If they are valuable as a base for the display of material supplied from outside sources, they have a more important function of fostering local distinctions and tradition of all kinds. This they can do by their permanent collections, by special exhibitions circulated to other centres in the locality, for example, to colleges of further education or to community centres. An outstanding value of the exhibition method is that it does not provide instruction only, but by the display of works of craftsmanship and art it gives a training in appreciation, a sense of quality and individual character. Another most important medium for visual education is the cine-film and at the present time the supply of specially produced educational films is being rapidly increased. The film, like the exhibition, is well adapted for demonstration of practical activities and skills of all kinds, and to the communication of cultural ideas and values. But it has a further distinctive contribution of particular importance in education. Owing to the exceptionally strong emotional impact of the cinema, films dealing with controversial topics - as, for example, the whole range of modern social questions - can be relied upon to provoke discussion and arouse interest in current problems. There are now a number of sources for educational films. Mention should also be made of the humbler filmstrip, which consists of a series of pictures printed on lengths of cine film and projected like miniature lantern slides. Being cheap and easily handled, they are an ideal means for illustrating informal demonstrations and lectures. These are already obtainable for a wide range of subjects from several commercial producers, and are likely to be supplied in increasing number from public sources. For those who still prefer the ordinary lantern slide, the largest and most accessible public collection is that of the Victoria and Albert Museum. The visual education : A Is the only answer to educate people B Can burgeon only among the urban people C May become effective to educate poor villagers D Requires huge investment
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