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Mock Practice Test-5

Question
42 out of 80
 

Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.

 

The reformer must know that what moves people is the authentic life, not mere writing. The newspaper and journals that Lokmanya Tilak and other reformers run, the books they works, sold little, but had enormous effect. Their writing was known to reflect and be just an extension of their exemplary lives. It was the authenticity of their lives which lent weight to their message, to their example. All knew that their lives were an integral whole they were not moral in public life and lax in private, nor vice versa. They were not full of pious thought and sacred resolutions within the walls of a temple.

A writer who is merely entertaining has readers, even one who is merely informing them, can do what he wants with the rest of his life. But the writer, who sets out to use his pen to reform public life, cannot afford such dualities.

Here is the testimony of one great man-about the influence of another, Lokmanya Tilak.

“I believe that an editor who has anything worth saying and who commands a clientele cannot be easily hushed. He delivered his finished message as soon as he is put under duress. The
Lokmanya spoke more eloquently from the Mandalay fortress than through columns of the printed Kesari. His influence was multiplied thousand fold by his imprisonment and his speech and his pen had acquired much greater power after he was discharged than before his imprisonment. By his death we have been editing his paper without pen and speech through the sacred resolution of the people to realize his life’s dream. He could possibly have done more if he were today in the flesh preaching his view. Critics like me would perhaps be still finding fault in the expression of his or that. Today his message rules millions of hearts which are determined to raise a permanent living memorial by the fulfillment of his ambition in their lives”.


In the context of the passage, a reformer becomes effective if:



A he is a journalist with an objective viewpoint.

B he is an author with an excellent style of writing.

C he is an effective political leader of the masses.

D he is a person with consistency in his writing and life style.

Ans. D

Mock Practice Test-5 Flashcard List

80 flashcards
1)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   A successful non-resident Indian employed in the United States returns to a backward Indian village and transforms the lives of the villagers. Sounds familiar? At 31, Ashwin Naik is pacing through the path Shah Rukh Khan traced in his offbeat Bollywood movie, Swades. Naik had just quit his cushy job in a genomics firm in the US to join MIT Sloan School of Business. With a month in hand, he headed home and travelled through the remote areas of Bagalkot district in Karnataka. The woeful social condition he saw moved him. Naik chucked the MBA course and in six months set up Vaatsalya Healthcare, a rural healthcare delivery system. In February 2005, Vaatsalya’s first hospital opened in Hubli. Two more centres were opened in Gadag and Karwar to offer pecialist services of surgeons and facilities such as physiotherapy for children suffering from cerebral palsy. “We introduced paediatric surgery for infants below six months”, says Naik. “Else, patients would have to be taken to distant cities of Hubli or Bangalore”. Naik plans 100 more units in five states in the next three years. Mere charity by an affluent, middle-class professional? Far from it. Vaatsalya is one of the rapidly spreading ‘for profit’ social enterprises that serves the poor and brings in profit. Mumbai-based Ziqitza, an ambulance services company, is another. It never refuses a patient for money, and charges Rs. 50 to Rs. 200. Done fleetingly in India and elsewhere till now, entrepreneurial minds with social conscience and methodically creating such models at a greater pace. “There has been a boom in the past two years”, says Varun Sahni, country director of Acumen Fund, a US-based social fund that invests in companies that target low income communities. “Currently, there are about 1,000 in India”. The timing seems perfect. There is a wide market acceptance and funding has been coming in easily. These enterprises work across the areas including healthcare, education, rural energy, agriculture, arts and crafts, banking and more. ‘For profit’ entrepreneurs are obsessed with social and environmental impact in addition to financial returns. Since they are answerable to the investors, that try expanding the business rapidly. SKS Microfinance, for instance, started in 1998 and has now over 900,000 customers, 440 branches and an outstanding loan disbursement of over Rs. 452 crore as of August 2007. Identify the appropriate business model of the kind of enterprise described by the author A Servicing societies at no profit. B Profit from poor people. C Setting up enterprises for masses of low-income groups on experimental basis. D Setting up enterprises for social causes for profit and expand rapidly.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   A successful non-resident Indian employed in the United States returns to a backward Indian village and transforms the lives of the villagers. Sounds familiar? At 31, Ashwin Naik is pacing through the path Shah Rukh Khan traced in his offbeat Bollywood movie, Swades. Naik had just quit his cushy job in a genomics firm in the US to join MIT Sloan School of Business. With a month in hand, he headed home and travelled through the remote areas of Bagalkot district in Karnataka. The woeful social condition he saw moved him. Naik chucked the MBA course and in six months set up Vaatsalya Healthcare, a rural healthcare delivery system. In February 2005, Vaatsalya’s first hospital opened in Hubli. Two more centres were opened in Gadag and Karwar to offer pecialist services of surgeons and facilities such as physiotherapy for children suffering from cerebral palsy. “We introduced paediatric surgery for infants below six months”, says Naik. “Else, patients would have to be taken to distant cities of Hubli or Bangalore”. Naik plans 100 more units in five states in the next three years. Mere charity by an affluent, middle-class professional? Far from it. Vaatsalya is one of the rapidly spreading ‘for profit’ social enterprises that serves the poor and brings in profit. Mumbai-based Ziqitza, an ambulance services company, is another. It never refuses a patient for money, and charges Rs. 50 to Rs. 200. Done fleetingly in India and elsewhere till now, entrepreneurial minds with social conscience and methodically creating such models at a greater pace. “There has been a boom in the past two years”, says Varun Sahni, country director of Acumen Fund, a US-based social fund that invests in companies that target low income communities. “Currently, there are about 1,000 in India”. The timing seems perfect. There is a wide market acceptance and funding has been coming in easily. These enterprises work across the areas including healthcare, education, rural energy, agriculture, arts and crafts, banking and more. ‘For profit’ entrepreneurs are obsessed with social and environmental impact in addition to financial returns. Since they are answerable to the investors, that try expanding the business rapidly. SKS Microfinance, for instance, started in 1998 and has now over 900,000 customers, 440 branches and an outstanding loan disbursement of over Rs. 452 crore as of August 2007. Which of the following companies does not illustrate the idea explained by the author? A SKS Microfinance B Acumen Fund C Ziqitza D Vaatsalya Healthcare
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   A successful non-resident Indian employed in the United States returns to a backward Indian village and transforms the lives of the villagers. Sounds familiar? At 31, Ashwin Naik is pacing through the path Shah Rukh Khan traced in his offbeat Bollywood movie, Swades. Naik had just quit his cushy job in a genomics firm in the US to join MIT Sloan School of Business. With a month in hand, he headed home and travelled through the remote areas of Bagalkot district in Karnataka. The woeful social condition he saw moved him. Naik chucked the MBA course and in six months set up Vaatsalya Healthcare, a rural healthcare delivery system. In February 2005, Vaatsalya’s first hospital opened in Hubli. Two more centres were opened in Gadag and Karwar to offer pecialist services of surgeons and facilities such as physiotherapy for children suffering from cerebral palsy. “We introduced paediatric surgery for infants below six months”, says Naik. “Else, patients would have to be taken to distant cities of Hubli or Bangalore”. Naik plans 100 more units in five states in the next three years. Mere charity by an affluent, middle-class professional? Far from it. Vaatsalya is one of the rapidly spreading ‘for profit’ social enterprises that serves the poor and brings in profit. Mumbai-based Ziqitza, an ambulance services company, is another. It never refuses a patient for money, and charges Rs. 50 to Rs. 200. Done fleetingly in India and elsewhere till now, entrepreneurial minds with social conscience and methodically creating such models at a greater pace. “There has been a boom in the past two years”, says Varun Sahni, country director of Acumen Fund, a US-based social fund that invests in companies that target low income communities. “Currently, there are about 1,000 in India”. The timing seems perfect. There is a wide market acceptance and funding has been coming in easily. These enterprises work across the areas including healthcare, education, rural energy, agriculture, arts and crafts, banking and more. ‘For profit’ entrepreneurs are obsessed with social and environmental impact in addition to financial returns. Since they are answerable to the investors, that try expanding the business rapidly. SKS Microfinance, for instance, started in 1998 and has now over 900,000 customers, 440 branches and an outstanding loan disbursement of over Rs. 452 crore as of August 2007. According to the author, which of the following options describes ‘for profit’ entrepreneurs most appropriately? A NRIs paying back to their motherland. B Those affluent, middle-class professionals treating it as charity. C Those who work towards getting financial returns on social business by expanding quickly. D Those who have sympathetic for their business ideas for poor.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   A successful non-resident Indian employed in the United States returns to a backward Indian village and transforms the lives of the villagers. Sounds familiar? At 31, Ashwin Naik is pacing through the path Shah Rukh Khan traced in his offbeat Bollywood movie, Swades. Naik had just quit his cushy job in a genomics firm in the US to join MIT Sloan School of Business. With a month in hand, he headed home and travelled through the remote areas of Bagalkot district in Karnataka. The woeful social condition he saw moved him. Naik chucked the MBA course and in six months set up Vaatsalya Healthcare, a rural healthcare delivery system. In February 2005, Vaatsalya’s first hospital opened in Hubli. Two more centres were opened in Gadag and Karwar to offer pecialist services of surgeons and facilities such as physiotherapy for children suffering from cerebral palsy. “We introduced paediatric surgery for infants below six months”, says Naik. “Else, patients would have to be taken to distant cities of Hubli or Bangalore”. Naik plans 100 more units in five states in the next three years. Mere charity by an affluent, middle-class professional? Far from it. Vaatsalya is one of the rapidly spreading ‘for profit’ social enterprises that serves the poor and brings in profit. Mumbai-based Ziqitza, an ambulance services company, is another. It never refuses a patient for money, and charges Rs. 50 to Rs. 200. Done fleetingly in India and elsewhere till now, entrepreneurial minds with social conscience and methodically creating such models at a greater pace. “There has been a boom in the past two years”, says Varun Sahni, country director of Acumen Fund, a US-based social fund that invests in companies that target low income communities. “Currently, there are about 1,000 in India”. The timing seems perfect. There is a wide market acceptance and funding has been coming in easily. These enterprises work across the areas including healthcare, education, rural energy, agriculture, arts and crafts, banking and more. ‘For profit’ entrepreneurs are obsessed with social and environmental impact in addition to financial returns. Since they are answerable to the investors, that try expanding the business rapidly. SKS Microfinance, for instance, started in 1998 and has now over 900,000 customers, 440 branches and an outstanding loan disbursement of over Rs. 452 crore as of August 2007. Social enterprises catering to the woeful conditions of the people are spreading rapidly. Which among the following statements is not true regarding their functioning. A Such enterprises are solely based on social impact and their is no place for financial gains/profits. B Such organizations are answerable to their investors. C Funding comes in easily for such enterprises. D Besides health care, enterprises are serving the needy in other areas also.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The reformer must know that what moves people is the authentic life, not mere writing. The newspaper and journals that Lokmanya Tilak and other reformers run, the books they works, sold little, but had enormous effect. Their writing was known to reflect and be just an extension of their exemplary lives. It was the authenticity of their lives which lent weight to their message, to their example. All knew that their lives were an integral whole they were not moral in public life and lax in private, nor vice versa. They were not full of pious thought and sacred resolutions within the walls of a temple. A writer who is merely entertaining has readers, even one who is merely informing them, can do what he wants with the rest of his life. But the writer, who sets out to use his pen to reform public life, cannot afford such dualities. Here is the testimony of one great man-about the influence of another, Lokmanya Tilak. “I believe that an editor who has anything worth saying and who commands a clientele cannot be easily hushed. He delivered his finished message as soon as he is put under duress. The Lokmanya spoke more eloquently from the Mandalay fortress than through columns of the printed Kesari. His influence was multiplied thousand fold by his imprisonment and his speech and his pen had acquired much greater power after he was discharged than before his imprisonment. By his death we have been editing his paper without pen and speech through the sacred resolution of the people to realize his life’s dream. He could possibly have done more if he were today in the flesh preaching his view. Critics like me would perhaps be still finding fault in the expression of his or that. Today his message rules millions of hearts which are determined to raise a permanent living memorial by the fulfillment of his ambition in their lives”. Lokmanya Tilak’s messages were most effective: A when he delivered them through his editorials. B after his death. C before his imprisonment. D when he delivered speeches.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The reformer must know that what moves people is the authentic life, not mere writing. The newspaper and journals that Lokmanya Tilak and other reformers run, the books they works, sold little, but had enormous effect. Their writing was known to reflect and be just an extension of their exemplary lives. It was the authenticity of their lives which lent weight to their message, to their example. All knew that their lives were an integral whole they were not moral in public life and lax in private, nor vice versa. They were not full of pious thought and sacred resolutions within the walls of a temple. A writer who is merely entertaining has readers, even one who is merely informing them, can do what he wants with the rest of his life. But the writer, who sets out to use his pen to reform public life, cannot afford such dualities. Here is the testimony of one great man-about the influence of another, Lokmanya Tilak. “I believe that an editor who has anything worth saying and who commands a clientele cannot be easily hushed. He delivered his finished message as soon as he is put under duress. The Lokmanya spoke more eloquently from the Mandalay fortress than through columns of the printed Kesari. His influence was multiplied thousand fold by his imprisonment and his speech and his pen had acquired much greater power after he was discharged than before his imprisonment. By his death we have been editing his paper without pen and speech through the sacred resolution of the people to realize his life’s dream. He could possibly have done more if he were today in the flesh preaching his view. Critics like me would perhaps be still finding fault in the expression of his or that. Today his message rules millions of hearts which are determined to raise a permanent living memorial by the fulfillment of his ambition in their lives”. Which of the following is the result of Lokmanya Tilak’s exemplary life? A The newspapers edited by him did not incur monetary loss. B The books written by him were useful. C People resolved to fulfil his life’s dream. D Critics still find fault with his views.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The reformer must know that what moves people is the authentic life, not mere writing. The newspaper and journals that Lokmanya Tilak and other reformers run, the books they works, sold little, but had enormous effect. Their writing was known to reflect and be just an extension of their exemplary lives. It was the authenticity of their lives which lent weight to their message, to their example. All knew that their lives were an integral whole they were not moral in public life and lax in private, nor vice versa. They were not full of pious thought and sacred resolutions within the walls of a temple. A writer who is merely entertaining has readers, even one who is merely informing them, can do what he wants with the rest of his life. But the writer, who sets out to use his pen to reform public life, cannot afford such dualities. Here is the testimony of one great man-about the influence of another, Lokmanya Tilak. “I believe that an editor who has anything worth saying and who commands a clientele cannot be easily hushed. He delivered his finished message as soon as he is put under duress. The Lokmanya spoke more eloquently from the Mandalay fortress than through columns of the printed Kesari. His influence was multiplied thousand fold by his imprisonment and his speech and his pen had acquired much greater power after he was discharged than before his imprisonment. By his death we have been editing his paper without pen and speech through the sacred resolution of the people to realize his life’s dream. He could possibly have done more if he were today in the flesh preaching his view. Critics like me would perhaps be still finding fault in the expression of his or that. Today his message rules millions of hearts which are determined to raise a permanent living memorial by the fulfillment of his ambition in their lives”. Which of the following is the general tendency of critics according to the passage? A To find fault with one or the other expression of a writer. B To praise only those writers whom they like. C To condemn one and all the reformer writers. D To suggest new ideas to the public.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The reformer must know that what moves people is the authentic life, not mere writing. The newspaper and journals that Lokmanya Tilak and other reformers run, the books they works, sold little, but had enormous effect. Their writing was known to reflect and be just an extension of their exemplary lives. It was the authenticity of their lives which lent weight to their message, to their example. All knew that their lives were an integral whole they were not moral in public life and lax in private, nor vice versa. They were not full of pious thought and sacred resolutions within the walls of a temple. A writer who is merely entertaining has readers, even one who is merely informing them, can do what he wants with the rest of his life. But the writer, who sets out to use his pen to reform public life, cannot afford such dualities. Here is the testimony of one great man-about the influence of another, Lokmanya Tilak. “I believe that an editor who has anything worth saying and who commands a clientele cannot be easily hushed. He delivered his finished message as soon as he is put under duress. The Lokmanya spoke more eloquently from the Mandalay fortress than through columns of the printed Kesari. His influence was multiplied thousand fold by his imprisonment and his speech and his pen had acquired much greater power after he was discharged than before his imprisonment. By his death we have been editing his paper without pen and speech through the sacred resolution of the people to realize his life’s dream. He could possibly have done more if he were today in the flesh preaching his view. Critics like me would perhaps be still finding fault in the expression of his or that. Today his message rules millions of hearts which are determined to raise a permanent living memorial by the fulfillment of his ambition in their lives”. In the context of the passage, a reformer becomes effective if: A he is a journalist with an objective viewpoint. B he is an author with an excellent style of writing. C he is an effective political leader of the masses. D he is a person with consistency in his writing and life style.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   After evidence was obtained in the 1920s that the universe is expanding, it became reasonable to ask: will the universe continue to expand indefinitely, or is there enough mass in it for the mutual attraction of its constituents to bring this expansion to a half? It can be calculated that the critical density of matter needed to break the expansion and “close” the universe, is equivalent to three hydrogen atoms per cubic meter. But the density of the observable universe—luminous matter in the form of galaxies comes to only a fraction of theis. If the expansion of the universe is to stop, there must be enough invisible matter in the universe to exceed the luminous matter in density by a factor of roughly 70. Our contribution to the search for this “missing matter” has been to study the rotational velocity of galaxies at various distance from their centre of rotation. It has been known for some time that outside the bright nucleus of a typical spiral galaxy luminosity falls off rapidly with distance from the centre. If luminosity is a true indicator of mass, most of the mass would be concentrated toward the centre. Outside the nucleus the rotational velocity would decrease geometrically with the distance from the centre, in conformity with Kepler’s law. Instead we have found that the rotational velocity in spiral galaxies either remains constant with increasing distance from the centre or increases slightly. This unexpected result indicates that the fall off in luminous mass with distance from the debtor is balanced by an increase in non-luminous mass. Our findings suggest that as much as 90 per cent of the mass of the universe is not radiating at any wavelength with enough intensity to be detected on the Earth. Such dark matter could be in the form of extremely dim stars of low mass of large planets like Jupiter, or of black holes, either small or massive. While it has not yet been determined whether this mass is sufficient to “close” the universe, some physicists consider it significant that estimates are converging on the critical value. The authors’ suggestion that “as much as 90 per cent of the mass of the universe is not radiating at any wavelength with enough intensity to be detected on the Earth” (last para) would be most weakened if which of the following were discovered to be true? A The density of the observable universe is greater than most previous estimates have suggested. B The bright nucleus of a typical spiral galaxy also contains some non-luminous matter. C Some galaxies do not rotate or rotate too slowly for their rotational velocity to be measured. D Spiral galaxies are less common than types of galaxies that contain little non-luminous matter.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   After evidence was obtained in the 1920s that the universe is expanding, it became reasonable to ask: will the universe continue to expand indefinitely, or is there enough mass in it for the mutual attraction of its constituents to bring this expansion to a half? It can be calculated that the critical density of matter needed to break the expansion and “close” the universe, is equivalent to three hydrogen atoms per cubic meter. But the density of the observable universe—luminous matter in the form of galaxies comes to only a fraction of theis. If the expansion of the universe is to stop, there must be enough invisible matter in the universe to exceed the luminous matter in density by a factor of roughly 70. Our contribution to the search for this “missing matter” has been to study the rotational velocity of galaxies at various distance from their centre of rotation. It has been known for some time that outside the bright nucleus of a typical spiral galaxy luminosity falls off rapidly with distance from the centre. If luminosity is a true indicator of mass, most of the mass would be concentrated toward the centre. Outside the nucleus the rotational velocity would decrease geometrically with the distance from the centre, in conformity with Kepler’s law. Instead we have found that the rotational velocity in spiral galaxies either remains constant with increasing distance from the centre or increases slightly. This unexpected result indicates that the fall off in luminous mass with distance from the debtor is balanced by an increase in non-luminous mass. Our findings suggest that as much as 90 per cent of the mass of the universe is not radiating at any wavelength with enough intensity to be detected on the Earth. Such dark matter could be in the form of extremely dim stars of low mass of large planets like Jupiter, or of black holes, either small or massive. While it has not yet been determined whether this mass is sufficient to “close” the universe, some physicists consider it significant that estimates are converging on the critical value. The authors’ study indicates that, in comparison with the outermost regions of a typical spiral galaxy, the region just outside the nucleus can be characterized as having A similar rotational velocity and similar luminosity. B lower rotational velocity and lower luminosity. C lower rotational velocity and higher luminosity. D similar rotational velocity and higher luminosity.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   After evidence was obtained in the 1920s that the universe is expanding, it became reasonable to ask: will the universe continue to expand indefinitely, or is there enough mass in it for the mutual attraction of its constituents to bring this expansion to a half? It can be calculated that the critical density of matter needed to break the expansion and “close” the universe, is equivalent to three hydrogen atoms per cubic meter. But the density of the observable universe—luminous matter in the form of galaxies comes to only a fraction of theis. If the expansion of the universe is to stop, there must be enough invisible matter in the universe to exceed the luminous matter in density by a factor of roughly 70. Our contribution to the search for this “missing matter” has been to study the rotational velocity of galaxies at various distance from their centre of rotation. It has been known for some time that outside the bright nucleus of a typical spiral galaxy luminosity falls off rapidly with distance from the centre. If luminosity is a true indicator of mass, most of the mass would be concentrated toward the centre. Outside the nucleus the rotational velocity would decrease geometrically with the distance from the centre, in conformity with Kepler’s law. Instead we have found that the rotational velocity in spiral galaxies either remains constant with increasing distance from the centre or increases slightly. This unexpected result indicates that the fall off in luminous mass with distance from the debtor is balanced by an increase in non-luminous mass. Our findings suggest that as much as 90 per cent of the mass of the universe is not radiating at any wavelength with enough intensity to be detected on the Earth. Such dark matter could be in the form of extremely dim stars of low mass of large planets like Jupiter, or of black holes, either small or massive. While it has not yet been determined whether this mass is sufficient to “close” the universe, some physicists consider it significant that estimates are converging on the critical value. It can be inferred from information presented in the passage that if the density of the universe were equivalent to significantly less than three hydrogen atoms per cubic metre, which of the following would be true as a consequence? A The density of the invisible matter in the universe would have to be more than 70 times the density of the luminous matter. B Different regions in spiral galaxies would rotate at the same velocity. C The universe would continue to expand indefinitely. D Luminosity would be a true indicator of mass.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   After evidence was obtained in the 1920s that the universe is expanding, it became reasonable to ask: will the universe continue to expand indefinitely, or is there enough mass in it for the mutual attraction of its constituents to bring this expansion to a half? It can be calculated that the critical density of matter needed to break the expansion and “close” the universe, is equivalent to three hydrogen atoms per cubic meter. But the density of the observable universe—luminous matter in the form of galaxies comes to only a fraction of theis. If the expansion of the universe is to stop, there must be enough invisible matter in the universe to exceed the luminous matter in density by a factor of roughly 70. Our contribution to the search for this “missing matter” has been to study the rotational velocity of galaxies at various distance from their centre of rotation. It has been known for some time that outside the bright nucleus of a typical spiral galaxy luminosity falls off rapidly with distance from the centre. If luminosity is a true indicator of mass, most of the mass would be concentrated toward the centre. Outside the nucleus the rotational velocity would decrease geometrically with the distance from the centre, in conformity with Kepler’s law. Instead we have found that the rotational velocity in spiral galaxies either remains constant with increasing distance from the centre or increases slightly. This unexpected result indicates that the fall off in luminous mass with distance from the debtor is balanced by an increase in non-luminous mass. Our findings suggest that as much as 90 per cent of the mass of the universe is not radiating at any wavelength with enough intensity to be detected on the Earth. Such dark matter could be in the form of extremely dim stars of low mass of large planets like Jupiter, or of black holes, either small or massive. While it has not yet been determined whether this mass is sufficient to “close” the universe, some physicists consider it significant that estimates are converging on the critical value. The authors propose all of the following as possibly contributing to the “missing matter” in spiral galaxies EXCEPT A small, dim stars B massive stars C massive black holes D large planets
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 “I pass to the greatest of all the play of plays, the greatest gentlemen’s game, which ladies like them best to play at the game of war. It is enchantingly pleasant to the imagination; we dress for it, however, more finely than for any other sport; go out to it, not merely in scarlet and gold, and all manners of fine colour of course we could fight better in gray, and without feathers; but all nations have agreed that it is good to be well dressed at this play. Then the bats and balls are very costly; our English and French bats, with the balls and wickets, even those which we do not make any use of, costing I suppose, now about fifteen millions of money annually to each nation; all which you know is paid by hard labour, who work in the furrow and furnace. A costly game not to speak of its consequences: I will say at present nothing of these. The mere immediate cost of all these plays is what I want you to consider, they are all paid for in daily work somewhere, as many of us know to well. The jewel cutter, whose sight fails over the diamond, the weaver whose arm fails over the web, the iron forger whose breath fails before the furance they know what work is they, who have all the work and none of play, except a kind they have named for themselves down in the black north country, where “play” means laid up by sickness”. The implied meaning of the passage is: A Labourers work as jewel cutters and weavers B English and French have been fighting C Destructive work cannot be real work D None of these
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 “I pass to the greatest of all the play of plays, the greatest gentlemen’s game, which ladies like them best to play at the game of war. It is enchantingly pleasant to the imagination; we dress for it, however, more finely than for any other sport; go out to it, not merely in scarlet and gold, and all manners of fine colour of course we could fight better in gray, and without feathers; but all nations have agreed that it is good to be well dressed at this play. Then the bats and balls are very costly; our English and French bats, with the balls and wickets, even those which we do not make any use of, costing I suppose, now about fifteen millions of money annually to each nation; all which you know is paid by hard labour, who work in the furrow and furnace. A costly game not to speak of its consequences: I will say at present nothing of these. The mere immediate cost of all these plays is what I want you to consider, they are all paid for in daily work somewhere, as many of us know to well. The jewel cutter, whose sight fails over the diamond, the weaver whose arm fails over the web, the iron forger whose breath fails before the furance they know what work is they, who have all the work and none of play, except a kind they have named for themselves down in the black north country, where “play” means laid up by sickness”. The writer does not say: A Play means laid up with sickness B War is a costly game C People and nations want that the soldiers must be well-dressed while fighting D Jewel cutter cuts gems for the soldiers
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