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Mock Practice Test-4

Question
45 out of 80
 

Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.

 

A grass which can grow almost anywhere in the world and which has been field tested in India may save world agriculture by checking soil erosion, according to World Bank experts. The miracle grass is vetiver which has been undergoing four years of field trials backed by more than 30 years of observations. The World Bank technical staff in India have now reported success in their tests with the vetiver as a simple method of reducing soil erosion and increasing moisture in soils, resulting in higher crop yields in the dry land tropics. The deep rooted grass offers a practical way to prevent erosion at the source and modify the vast environmental and economic problems erosion causes. Vetiver could be a low cost way to protect billions of dollars of investments in agriculture, forestry, public works and the environmental worldwide, according to the Bank. Teams from over 20 nations have already visited India to see how the vetiver is growing. Each year, Asia loses about 25 billion tone of topsoil because of erosion and the US about a billion ton, according to R.G. Grimshaw, division chief of the World Bank’s Asia region.

He told a press conference that Zimbabwe with only six million people loses nitrogen and phosphate valued at 2.5 billion a year because of erosion.

Vetiver is a special grass, not like lawn grass or the tall grass of the wastelands. The roots go straight down and do not encroach into crop land. Vetiver can grow in deserts or swamps and it can thrive in rocky surfaces and in fine soil. It is resistant to pests. When planted as a hedge, vetiver acts as a barrier against soil erosion and the hedge will last for centuries.

‘The vetiver system’, said John Greenfield, a World Bank consultant who has done soil conservation work in India, Fiji and other countries, is easy to understand and implement, costs next to nothing and could be quickly adopted by millions of farmers, corporations, and Government. Vetiver grows practically on any soil.

Vetiver grass technology is currently being introduced in a number of developing country’s agricultural programmes supported by the World Bank, including those in India, China, the Philippines, Sir Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Indonesia, Brazil, Nigeria and Madagascar. “The grass grows everywhere under different names. So we don’t have to introduce it to countries”, according to Grimshaw.

Developed countries including Australia and the US are also looking into the potential benefits of vetiver for domestic use.


Asia lose every year



A about a billon tons of top soil.

B about twenty five billon tons of top soil.

C 2.5 billion tons of top soil.

D very little top soil.

Ans. B

Mock Practice Test-4 Flashcard List

80 flashcards
1)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   From the end of 1929, New Delhi’s Government house had been the home and headquarters to the men ruling India on the British King or Emperor’s behalf—Irwin, Willingdon, Linlithgow, Wavel and Mountbatten. The great Edwin Lutyens had chosen its location at the western end of Kingsway near the Purana Quila or the Old Fort Citadel of ancient rulers. He also designed its shape, contents and surroundings. The five-acre building had a mile-and-a-half of corridors and 340 rooms. The Darbar Hall was for occasional visit of the king, for his address to his subjects. In the Banquet Hall and the Ball Room, the other grand room, the jewels, coronets and tiaras of many Indian princesses and of five Viceroys and Vicereines had glittered under crystal chandeliers. Now in June 1948 this was going to be the home of one whose father had once known, and prized, a Rs. 5/- a month salary and who himself, until the Mahatma changed him, had thought of the bullet and the bombs as the means of ending British rule. The rule had ended, but India was dominion and C.R. would enter the Government House as the King’s representative. He would be first Indian Governor General replacing Mountbatten, the last British King’s representative. It was an irony that had flowed over from fables to real life. C.R. imagined himself shaking hands with Warren Hastings across the ages and saying, “You were the first and I am the last”. Hastings had however, great powers, but C.R. would not have them. They belonged to Jawaharlal and Patel. But the two would lean on him as they had leaned on Mountbatten. Over the 18 months Rajaji charmed diplomats and helped sustain Nehru-Patel partnership. He knew how a constitutional Governor-General had to behave, how to keep limits and yet how to break the limits. From the end of 1929, New Delhi’s Government House had been the home and headquarters of the A persons who ruled India as the representatives of the British Kings B members of the British Royal family C member of the Mughal Rulers D Indian Princes
2)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   From the end of 1929, New Delhi’s Government house had been the home and headquarters to the men ruling India on the British King or Emperor’s behalf—Irwin, Willingdon, Linlithgow, Wavel and Mountbatten. The great Edwin Lutyens had chosen its location at the western end of Kingsway near the Purana Quila or the Old Fort Citadel of ancient rulers. He also designed its shape, contents and surroundings. The five-acre building had a mile-and-a-half of corridors and 340 rooms. The Darbar Hall was for occasional visit of the king, for his address to his subjects. In the Banquet Hall and the Ball Room, the other grand room, the jewels, coronets and tiaras of many Indian princesses and of five Viceroys and Vicereines had glittered under crystal chandeliers. Now in June 1948 this was going to be the home of one whose father had once known, and prized, a Rs. 5/- a month salary and who himself, until the Mahatma changed him, had thought of the bullet and the bombs as the means of ending British rule. The rule had ended, but India was dominion and C.R. would enter the Government House as the King’s representative. He would be first Indian Governor General replacing Mountbatten, the last British King’s representative. It was an irony that had flowed over from fables to real life. C.R. imagined himself shaking hands with Warren Hastings across the ages and saying, “You were the first and I am the last”. Hastings had however, great powers, but C.R. would not have them. They belonged to Jawaharlal and Patel. But the two would lean on him as they had leaned on Mountbatten. Over the 18 months Rajaji charmed diplomats and helped sustain Nehru-Patel partnership. He knew how a constitutional Governor-General had to behave, how to keep limits and yet how to break the limits. In June 1948, the Government House in New Delhi became the home of A the first Indian Governor General B the Prime Minister of India C Patel D Mahatma Gandhi
3)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   From the end of 1929, New Delhi’s Government house had been the home and headquarters to the men ruling India on the British King or Emperor’s behalf—Irwin, Willingdon, Linlithgow, Wavel and Mountbatten. The great Edwin Lutyens had chosen its location at the western end of Kingsway near the Purana Quila or the Old Fort Citadel of ancient rulers. He also designed its shape, contents and surroundings. The five-acre building had a mile-and-a-half of corridors and 340 rooms. The Darbar Hall was for occasional visit of the king, for his address to his subjects. In the Banquet Hall and the Ball Room, the other grand room, the jewels, coronets and tiaras of many Indian princesses and of five Viceroys and Vicereines had glittered under crystal chandeliers. Now in June 1948 this was going to be the home of one whose father had once known, and prized, a Rs. 5/- a month salary and who himself, until the Mahatma changed him, had thought of the bullet and the bombs as the means of ending British rule. The rule had ended, but India was dominion and C.R. would enter the Government House as the King’s representative. He would be first Indian Governor General replacing Mountbatten, the last British King’s representative. It was an irony that had flowed over from fables to real life. C.R. imagined himself shaking hands with Warren Hastings across the ages and saying, “You were the first and I am the last”. Hastings had however, great powers, but C.R. would not have them. They belonged to Jawaharlal and Patel. But the two would lean on him as they had leaned on Mountbatten. Over the 18 months Rajaji charmed diplomats and helped sustain Nehru-Patel partnership. He knew how a constitutional Governor-General had to behave, how to keep limits and yet how to break the limits. C R. knew how to behave as A a powerful Governor General B the last Governor General of India C the titular head of a Government D the link between the past and present Governor General.
4)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   From the end of 1929, New Delhi’s Government house had been the home and headquarters to the men ruling India on the British King or Emperor’s behalf—Irwin, Willingdon, Linlithgow, Wavel and Mountbatten. The great Edwin Lutyens had chosen its location at the western end of Kingsway near the Purana Quila or the Old Fort Citadel of ancient rulers. He also designed its shape, contents and surroundings. The five-acre building had a mile-and-a-half of corridors and 340 rooms. The Darbar Hall was for occasional visit of the king, for his address to his subjects. In the Banquet Hall and the Ball Room, the other grand room, the jewels, coronets and tiaras of many Indian princesses and of five Viceroys and Vicereines had glittered under crystal chandeliers. Now in June 1948 this was going to be the home of one whose father had once known, and prized, a Rs. 5/- a month salary and who himself, until the Mahatma changed him, had thought of the bullet and the bombs as the means of ending British rule. The rule had ended, but India was dominion and C.R. would enter the Government House as the King’s representative. He would be first Indian Governor General replacing Mountbatten, the last British King’s representative. It was an irony that had flowed over from fables to real life. C.R. imagined himself shaking hands with Warren Hastings across the ages and saying, “You were the first and I am the last”. Hastings had however, great powers, but C.R. would not have them. They belonged to Jawaharlal and Patel. But the two would lean on him as they had leaned on Mountbatten. Over the 18 months Rajaji charmed diplomats and helped sustain Nehru-Patel partnership. He knew how a constitutional Governor-General had to behave, how to keep limits and yet how to break the limits. Though C.R. was the Governor General, the real power lay in the hands of A the British King B Mahatma Gandhi C Jawharlal and Patel D Lord Mountbatten
5)
Calcutta, the first city of British India, 16th Aug, 1780. The first governor General, Warren Hastings, returned early to his residence at No. 7, Hastings Street. He set down at his large Secretariat Table, his slight frame bent in thought. He was in a pensile mood and was perhaps recollecting his difficult orphaned childhood and his happier school days at Westminster School where he made the acquaintance, amongst other contemporaries, of Sir Elijah Impey, the future Chief Justice of Bengal. On this particular hot and humid night, he recalled the emotions which he felt on a cold January morning, 30 years ago, when at the age of 18, as a “writer of the East India Company”, he stood on the deck of the Indiaman, and watched the shores of England recede. Nine and a half months later, he set foot on the banks of the Hooghly at the Kalpi anchorage, some 50 miles downstream from the British settlement of Calcutta, then barely 50 years old. He had come a long way since then. He took up his quill and in the flickering lamplight began to write his last will and testament. He put it away carefully in his camping chest. He then composed a letter to his wife, his dearest Marian, the former Baroness Von Imhoff whom he had purposely left in Chinsura under the care of his good friend, the Hon. Johannes Mathias Ross, the head of the Dutch factory there. The letter was to be handed to her next morning in the event of his death. Warren Hasting came to India by a boat named A Indiaman B Kalpi C not mentioned in the passage D Hooghly
6)
Calcutta, the first city of British India, 16th Aug, 1780. The first governor General, Warren Hastings, returned early to his residence at No. 7, Hastings Street. He set down at his large Secretariat Table, his slight frame bent in thought. He was in a pensile mood and was perhaps recollecting his difficult orphaned childhood and his happier school days at Westminster School where he made the acquaintance, amongst other contemporaries, of Sir Elijah Impey, the future Chief Justice of Bengal. On this particular hot and humid night, he recalled the emotions which he felt on a cold January morning, 30 years ago, when at the age of 18, as a “writer of the East India Company”, he stood on the deck of the Indiaman, and watched the shores of England recede. Nine and a half months later, he set foot on the banks of the Hooghly at the Kalpi anchorage, some 50 miles downstream from the British settlement of Calcutta, then barely 50 years old. He had come a long way since then. He took up his quill and in the flickering lamplight began to write his last will and testament. He put it away carefully in his camping chest. He then composed a letter to his wife, his dearest Marian, the former Baroness Von Imhoff whom he had purposely left in Chinsura under the care of his good friend, the Hon. Johannes Mathias Ross, the head of the Dutch factory there. The letter was to be handed to her next morning in the event of his death. When Hastings came to India, he was A 30 years old. B 18 years old. C 50 years old. D 25 years old.
7)
Calcutta, the first city of British India, 16th Aug, 1780. The first governor General, Warren Hastings, returned early to his residence at No. 7, Hastings Street. He set down at his large Secretariat Table, his slight frame bent in thought. He was in a pensile mood and was perhaps recollecting his difficult orphaned childhood and his happier school days at Westminster School where he made the acquaintance, amongst other contemporaries, of Sir Elijah Impey, the future Chief Justice of Bengal. On this particular hot and humid night, he recalled the emotions which he felt on a cold January morning, 30 years ago, when at the age of 18, as a “writer of the East India Company”, he stood on the deck of the Indiaman, and watched the shores of England recede. Nine and a half months later, he set foot on the banks of the Hooghly at the Kalpi anchorage, some 50 miles downstream from the British settlement of Calcutta, then barely 50 years old. He had come a long way since then. He took up his quill and in the flickering lamplight began to write his last will and testament. He put it away carefully in his camping chest. He then composed a letter to his wife, his dearest Marian, the former Baroness Von Imhoff whom he had purposely left in Chinsura under the care of his good friend, the Hon. Johannes Mathias Ross, the head of the Dutch factory there. The letter was to be handed to her next morning in the event of his death. Warren Hastings landed at A Chinsurah. B Kalpi. C Calcutta. D Delhi.
8)
Calcutta, the first city of British India, 16th Aug, 1780. The first governor General, Warren Hastings, returned early to his residence at No. 7, Hastings Street. He set down at his large Secretariat Table, his slight frame bent in thought. He was in a pensile mood and was perhaps recollecting his difficult orphaned childhood and his happier school days at Westminster School where he made the acquaintance, amongst other contemporaries, of Sir Elijah Impey, the future Chief Justice of Bengal. On this particular hot and humid night, he recalled the emotions which he felt on a cold January morning, 30 years ago, when at the age of 18, as a “writer of the East India Company”, he stood on the deck of the Indiaman, and watched the shores of England recede. Nine and a half months later, he set foot on the banks of the Hooghly at the Kalpi anchorage, some 50 miles downstream from the British settlement of Calcutta, then barely 50 years old. He had come a long way since then. He took up his quill and in the flickering lamplight began to write his last will and testament. He put it away carefully in his camping chest. He then composed a letter to his wife, his dearest Marian, the former Baroness Von Imhoff whom he had purposely left in Chinsura under the care of his good friend, the Hon. Johannes Mathias Ross, the head of the Dutch factory there. The letter was to be handed to her next morning in the event of his death. “He had come a long way since then” means A he had walked a long way. B   he had traveled a lot. C   a long time had passed since then. D he had habit of going for long walks.
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42)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   A grass which can grow almost anywhere in the world and which has been field tested in India may save world agriculture by checking soil erosion, according to World Bank experts. The miracle grass is vetiver which has been undergoing four years of field trials backed by more than 30 years of observations. The World Bank technical staff in India have now reported success in their tests with the vetiver as a simple method of reducing soil erosion and increasing moisture in soils, resulting in higher crop yields in the dry land tropics. The deep rooted grass offers a practical way to prevent erosion at the source and modify the vast environmental and economic problems erosion causes. Vetiver could be a low cost way to protect billions of dollars of investments in agriculture, forestry, public works and the environmental worldwide, according to the Bank. Teams from over 20 nations have already visited India to see how the vetiver is growing. Each year, Asia loses about 25 billion tone of topsoil because of erosion and the US about a billion ton, according to R.G. Grimshaw, division chief of the World Bank’s Asia region. He told a press conference that Zimbabwe with only six million people loses nitrogen and phosphate valued at 2.5 billion a year because of erosion. Vetiver is a special grass, not like lawn grass or the tall grass of the wastelands. The roots go straight down and do not encroach into crop land. Vetiver can grow in deserts or swamps and it can thrive in rocky surfaces and in fine soil. It is resistant to pests. When planted as a hedge, vetiver acts as a barrier against soil erosion and the hedge will last for centuries. ‘The vetiver system’, said John Greenfield, a World Bank consultant who has done soil conservation work in India, Fiji and other countries, is easy to understand and implement, costs next to nothing and could be quickly adopted by millions of farmers, corporations, and Government. Vetiver grows practically on any soil. Vetiver grass technology is currently being introduced in a number of developing country’s agricultural programmes supported by the World Bank, including those in India, China, the Philippines, Sir Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Indonesia, Brazil, Nigeria and Madagascar. “The grass grows everywhere under different names. So we don’t have to introduce it to countries”, according to Grimshaw. Developed countries including Australia and the US are also looking into the potential benefits of vetiver for domestic use. The miracle grass was kept under observations for A four years. B thirty years. C thirty four years. D never.
43)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   A grass which can grow almost anywhere in the world and which has been field tested in India may save world agriculture by checking soil erosion, according to World Bank experts. The miracle grass is vetiver which has been undergoing four years of field trials backed by more than 30 years of observations. The World Bank technical staff in India have now reported success in their tests with the vetiver as a simple method of reducing soil erosion and increasing moisture in soils, resulting in higher crop yields in the dry land tropics. The deep rooted grass offers a practical way to prevent erosion at the source and modify the vast environmental and economic problems erosion causes. Vetiver could be a low cost way to protect billions of dollars of investments in agriculture, forestry, public works and the environmental worldwide, according to the Bank. Teams from over 20 nations have already visited India to see how the vetiver is growing. Each year, Asia loses about 25 billion tone of topsoil because of erosion and the US about a billion ton, according to R.G. Grimshaw, division chief of the World Bank’s Asia region. He told a press conference that Zimbabwe with only six million people loses nitrogen and phosphate valued at 2.5 billion a year because of erosion. Vetiver is a special grass, not like lawn grass or the tall grass of the wastelands. The roots go straight down and do not encroach into crop land. Vetiver can grow in deserts or swamps and it can thrive in rocky surfaces and in fine soil. It is resistant to pests. When planted as a hedge, vetiver acts as a barrier against soil erosion and the hedge will last for centuries. ‘The vetiver system’, said John Greenfield, a World Bank consultant who has done soil conservation work in India, Fiji and other countries, is easy to understand and implement, costs next to nothing and could be quickly adopted by millions of farmers, corporations, and Government. Vetiver grows practically on any soil. Vetiver grass technology is currently being introduced in a number of developing country’s agricultural programmes supported by the World Bank, including those in India, China, the Philippines, Sir Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Indonesia, Brazil, Nigeria and Madagascar. “The grass grows everywhere under different names. So we don’t have to introduce it to countries”, according to Grimshaw. Developed countries including Australia and the US are also looking into the potential benefits of vetiver for domestic use. Introduction of vetiver grass will A reduce only soil erosion. B only increase moisture in soil. C reduce soil erosion and also increase moisture in soil. D attract pests.
44)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   A grass which can grow almost anywhere in the world and which has been field tested in India may save world agriculture by checking soil erosion, according to World Bank experts. The miracle grass is vetiver which has been undergoing four years of field trials backed by more than 30 years of observations. The World Bank technical staff in India have now reported success in their tests with the vetiver as a simple method of reducing soil erosion and increasing moisture in soils, resulting in higher crop yields in the dry land tropics. The deep rooted grass offers a practical way to prevent erosion at the source and modify the vast environmental and economic problems erosion causes. Vetiver could be a low cost way to protect billions of dollars of investments in agriculture, forestry, public works and the environmental worldwide, according to the Bank. Teams from over 20 nations have already visited India to see how the vetiver is growing. Each year, Asia loses about 25 billion tone of topsoil because of erosion and the US about a billion ton, according to R.G. Grimshaw, division chief of the World Bank’s Asia region. He told a press conference that Zimbabwe with only six million people loses nitrogen and phosphate valued at 2.5 billion a year because of erosion. Vetiver is a special grass, not like lawn grass or the tall grass of the wastelands. The roots go straight down and do not encroach into crop land. Vetiver can grow in deserts or swamps and it can thrive in rocky surfaces and in fine soil. It is resistant to pests. When planted as a hedge, vetiver acts as a barrier against soil erosion and the hedge will last for centuries. ‘The vetiver system’, said John Greenfield, a World Bank consultant who has done soil conservation work in India, Fiji and other countries, is easy to understand and implement, costs next to nothing and could be quickly adopted by millions of farmers, corporations, and Government. Vetiver grows practically on any soil. Vetiver grass technology is currently being introduced in a number of developing country’s agricultural programmes supported by the World Bank, including those in India, China, the Philippines, Sir Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Indonesia, Brazil, Nigeria and Madagascar. “The grass grows everywhere under different names. So we don’t have to introduce it to countries”, according to Grimshaw. Developed countries including Australia and the US are also looking into the potential benefits of vetiver for domestic use. Vetiver is a special type of grass that grows in A rocky soils only. B swamps only. C deserts only. D practically all types of soil.
45)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   A grass which can grow almost anywhere in the world and which has been field tested in India may save world agriculture by checking soil erosion, according to World Bank experts. The miracle grass is vetiver which has been undergoing four years of field trials backed by more than 30 years of observations. The World Bank technical staff in India have now reported success in their tests with the vetiver as a simple method of reducing soil erosion and increasing moisture in soils, resulting in higher crop yields in the dry land tropics. The deep rooted grass offers a practical way to prevent erosion at the source and modify the vast environmental and economic problems erosion causes. Vetiver could be a low cost way to protect billions of dollars of investments in agriculture, forestry, public works and the environmental worldwide, according to the Bank. Teams from over 20 nations have already visited India to see how the vetiver is growing. Each year, Asia loses about 25 billion tone of topsoil because of erosion and the US about a billion ton, according to R.G. Grimshaw, division chief of the World Bank’s Asia region. He told a press conference that Zimbabwe with only six million people loses nitrogen and phosphate valued at 2.5 billion a year because of erosion. Vetiver is a special grass, not like lawn grass or the tall grass of the wastelands. The roots go straight down and do not encroach into crop land. Vetiver can grow in deserts or swamps and it can thrive in rocky surfaces and in fine soil. It is resistant to pests. When planted as a hedge, vetiver acts as a barrier against soil erosion and the hedge will last for centuries. ‘The vetiver system’, said John Greenfield, a World Bank consultant who has done soil conservation work in India, Fiji and other countries, is easy to understand and implement, costs next to nothing and could be quickly adopted by millions of farmers, corporations, and Government. Vetiver grows practically on any soil. Vetiver grass technology is currently being introduced in a number of developing country’s agricultural programmes supported by the World Bank, including those in India, China, the Philippines, Sir Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Indonesia, Brazil, Nigeria and Madagascar. “The grass grows everywhere under different names. So we don’t have to introduce it to countries”, according to Grimshaw. Developed countries including Australia and the US are also looking into the potential benefits of vetiver for domestic use. Asia lose every year A about a billon tons of top soil. B about twenty five billon tons of top soil. C 2.5 billion tons of top soil. D very little top soil.
46)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   When Aurobindo was in England, Maharaja Sayaji Rao Gaekwad of Baroda, a fervent nationalist himself went to him and offered him a job in the Baroda State. Aurobindo sailed for India in February 1893 to join the Baroda State Service. In Bengal, Aurobindo played the pivotal role in building the militant nationalist movement. In 1899 Jatindranath Banerjee (who later came to be known as Niralamba Swami) met him in Baroda with an introduction from Sarala Devi Chaudhurani to take military training. As Bengalis were not encouraged to join military service, Jatin Banerjee was recruited in the Baroda State Army under the adopted name, Upadhyaya, with the help of Aurobindo. Jatin returned to Calcutta in 1902 to establish a revolutionary center, called East Club at 108 Upper Circular Road. Sister Nivedita helped Jatin to build up a library for revolutionaries by donating about 200 books and herself joined the club as an executive member. Aurobindo visited the club, accompanied by his brother Barin to develop it and build up the revolutionary movement in Bengal. In 1903 Aurobindo forged a merger of his Baroda group, led by Jatin Banerjee, with the Anushilan Samiti and became the Vice President along with C.R. Das. In 1903, Aurobindo visited Bengal again and stayed with Jogendranath Vidyabhusan. The latter had written on the lives of Mazzini and Garibaldi in Bengali. Jatin Banerjee met Aurobindo A to bring him back to Bengal. B to take military training. C to pay his respects for him. D to exchange social pleasantries.
47)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   When Aurobindo was in England, Maharaja Sayaji Rao Gaekwad of Baroda, a fervent nationalist himself went to him and offered him a job in the Baroda State. Aurobindo sailed for India in February 1893 to join the Baroda State Service. In Bengal, Aurobindo played the pivotal role in building the militant nationalist movement. In 1899 Jatindranath Banerjee (who later came to be known as Niralamba Swami) met him in Baroda with an introduction from Sarala Devi Chaudhurani to take military training. As Bengalis were not encouraged to join military service, Jatin Banerjee was recruited in the Baroda State Army under the adopted name, Upadhyaya, with the help of Aurobindo. Jatin returned to Calcutta in 1902 to establish a revolutionary center, called East Club at 108 Upper Circular Road. Sister Nivedita helped Jatin to build up a library for revolutionaries by donating about 200 books and herself joined the club as an executive member. Aurobindo visited the club, accompanied by his brother Barin to develop it and build up the revolutionary movement in Bengal. In 1903 Aurobindo forged a merger of his Baroda group, led by Jatin Banerjee, with the Anushilan Samiti and became the Vice President along with C.R. Das. In 1903, Aurobindo visited Bengal again and stayed with Jogendranath Vidyabhusan. The latter had written on the lives of Mazzini and Garibaldi in Bengali. The main objective of the East Club was A to offer free education to the people. B to build up a revolutionary movement in Bengal. C to train up young men in sports and games. D to study in the library.
48)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   When Aurobindo was in England, Maharaja Sayaji Rao Gaekwad of Baroda, a fervent nationalist himself went to him and offered him a job in the Baroda State. Aurobindo sailed for India in February 1893 to join the Baroda State Service. In Bengal, Aurobindo played the pivotal role in building the militant nationalist movement. In 1899 Jatindranath Banerjee (who later came to be known as Niralamba Swami) met him in Baroda with an introduction from Sarala Devi Chaudhurani to take military training. As Bengalis were not encouraged to join military service, Jatin Banerjee was recruited in the Baroda State Army under the adopted name, Upadhyaya, with the help of Aurobindo. Jatin returned to Calcutta in 1902 to establish a revolutionary center, called East Club at 108 Upper Circular Road. Sister Nivedita helped Jatin to build up a library for revolutionaries by donating about 200 books and herself joined the club as an executive member. Aurobindo visited the club, accompanied by his brother Barin to develop it and build up the revolutionary movement in Bengal. In 1903 Aurobindo forged a merger of his Baroda group, led by Jatin Banerjee, with the Anushilan Samiti and became the Vice President along with C.R. Das. In 1903, Aurobindo visited Bengal again and stayed with Jogendranath Vidyabhusan. The latter had written on the lives of Mazzini and Garibaldi in Bengali. Before its merger with the Anushilan Samity, Baroda group had as its leader. A Sri Aurobindo B Jatin Banerjee C Barin Ghosh D Vidyabhusan
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   When Aurobindo was in England, Maharaja Sayaji Rao Gaekwad of Baroda, a fervent nationalist himself went to him and offered him a job in the Baroda State. Aurobindo sailed for India in February 1893 to join the Baroda State Service. In Bengal, Aurobindo played the pivotal role in building the militant nationalist movement. In 1899 Jatindranath Banerjee (who later came to be known as Niralamba Swami) met him in Baroda with an introduction from Sarala Devi Chaudhurani to take military training. As Bengalis were not encouraged to join military service, Jatin Banerjee was recruited in the Baroda State Army under the adopted name, Upadhyaya, with the help of Aurobindo. Jatin returned to Calcutta in 1902 to establish a revolutionary center, called East Club at 108 Upper Circular Road. Sister Nivedita helped Jatin to build up a library for revolutionaries by donating about 200 books and herself joined the club as an executive member. Aurobindo visited the club, accompanied by his brother Barin to develop it and build up the revolutionary movement in Bengal. In 1903 Aurobindo forged a merger of his Baroda group, led by Jatin Banerjee, with the Anushilan Samiti and became the Vice President along with C.R. Das. In 1903, Aurobindo visited Bengal again and stayed with Jogendranath Vidyabhusan. The latter had written on the lives of Mazzini and Garibaldi in Bengali. The lives of Mazzini and Garibaldi were written in Bengali by A Sri Aurobindo. B Jogendranath Vidyabhusan. C Sister Nivedita. D None of the above.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The Emergency Banking Act foretold at the very outset the direction in which the New Deal was to go. With the whole financial system in a state of collapse, the President might have turned towards the left, with social revolution somewhat after the Russian pattern as his goal. Had he directed Congress to nationalise the banking system, a long step towards the state ownership and administration of all industry and finance would have been taken. He might also have turned to the right, towards what, in contrast with communism, was currently called fascism, and drew its inspiration from the exploits of Mussolini in Italy. His goal then would have been to preserve profit system at the expense, if need be, of democracy. But neither communism nor fascism had any deep footing in America, and one seemed as likely as the other to develop into an irresponsible dictatorship. There is evidence that the President considered either. What he proposed was a middle course more in line with American precedents. The business of the nation should be left in private hands, but controls should be set by government to prevent the ever-recurring booms and crises from which capitalism had suffered so long. Extreme individualism had already been limited by extensive governmental regulation; what Roosevelt had in mind was to extend regulation; to the point where it would result in a planned economy. The powers of government would be amplified, but the rights of the individual would not be destroyed. In addition to this interest in permanent reform, the President was determined also to make more adequate provision for the relief of the unemployed and to promote by every means at his disposal the restoration of a normal business prosperity. There is every reason to believe that the President himself was a A leftist B rightist C radical D moderate
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The Emergency Banking Act foretold at the very outset the direction in which the New Deal was to go. With the whole financial system in a state of collapse, the President might have turned towards the left, with social revolution somewhat after the Russian pattern as his goal. Had he directed Congress to nationalise the banking system, a long step towards the state ownership and administration of all industry and finance would have been taken. He might also have turned to the right, towards what, in contrast with communism, was currently called fascism, and drew its inspiration from the exploits of Mussolini in Italy. His goal then would have been to preserve profit system at the expense, if need be, of democracy. But neither communism nor fascism had any deep footing in America, and one seemed as likely as the other to develop into an irresponsible dictatorship. There is evidence that the President considered either. What he proposed was a middle course more in line with American precedents. The business of the nation should be left in private hands, but controls should be set by government to prevent the ever-recurring booms and crises from which capitalism had suffered so long. Extreme individualism had already been limited by extensive governmental regulation; what Roosevelt had in mind was to extend regulation; to the point where it would result in a planned economy. The powers of government would be amplified, but the rights of the individual would not be destroyed. In addition to this interest in permanent reform, the President was determined also to make more adequate provision for the relief of the unemployed and to promote by every means at his disposal the restoration of a normal business prosperity. The steps taken by the New Deal were introduced in response to: A the Depression B the Second World War C Hitlar’s rise to power in Germany D the threat of communism
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The Emergency Banking Act foretold at the very outset the direction in which the New Deal was to go. With the whole financial system in a state of collapse, the President might have turned towards the left, with social revolution somewhat after the Russian pattern as his goal. Had he directed Congress to nationalise the banking system, a long step towards the state ownership and administration of all industry and finance would have been taken. He might also have turned to the right, towards what, in contrast with communism, was currently called fascism, and drew its inspiration from the exploits of Mussolini in Italy. His goal then would have been to preserve profit system at the expense, if need be, of democracy. But neither communism nor fascism had any deep footing in America, and one seemed as likely as the other to develop into an irresponsible dictatorship. There is evidence that the President considered either. What he proposed was a middle course more in line with American precedents. The business of the nation should be left in private hands, but controls should be set by government to prevent the ever-recurring booms and crises from which capitalism had suffered so long. Extreme individualism had already been limited by extensive governmental regulation; what Roosevelt had in mind was to extend regulation; to the point where it would result in a planned economy. The powers of government would be amplified, but the rights of the individual would not be destroyed. In addition to this interest in permanent reform, the President was determined also to make more adequate provision for the relief of the unemployed and to promote by every means at his disposal the restoration of a normal business prosperity. The amplification of governmental powers under the New Deal was intended to be limited by: A the doctrine of laissez faire B the individual rights C available funds D increased corporation and union rights
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Under the concerted assault of the modern debunking ‘sciences’, psychology and sociology, nothing indeed has seemed to be more safely buried than the concept of freedom. Even revolutionists would rather degrade freedom to the rank of a lower-middle class prejudice than admit that the aim of revolution was and always has been, freedom. Yet if it was amazing to see how the very word freedom could disappear from the revolutionary vocabulary, it has perhaps been no less astounding to watch how in recent years the idea of freedom has intruded itself into the centre of the gravest of all present political debates, the discussion of war and of a justifiable use of violence. Historically, wars are among the oldest phenomena of the recorded past while revolutions, properly speaking, did not exist prior to the modern age; they are among the most recent of all major political data. In contrast to revolution, the aim of war was only in rare cases bound up with the notion of freedom; and while it is true that warlike uprisings against a foreign invader have frequently been felt to be sacred, they have never been recognised, either in theory or in practice, as the only just wars. What can we infer from the passage? A Revolutions are of recent origin B Aim of war is freedom C Wars and revolutions determine the physiognomy of the present age D None of these
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Under the concerted assault of the modern debunking ‘sciences’, psychology and sociology, nothing indeed has seemed to be more safely buried than the concept of freedom. Even revolutionists would rather degrade freedom to the rank of a lower-middle class prejudice than admit that the aim of revolution was and always has been, freedom. Yet if it was amazing to see how the very word freedom could disappear from the revolutionary vocabulary, it has perhaps been no less astounding to watch how in recent years the idea of freedom has intruded itself into the centre of the gravest of all present political debates, the discussion of war and of a justifiable use of violence. Historically, wars are among the oldest phenomena of the recorded past while revolutions, properly speaking, did not exist prior to the modern age; they are among the most recent of all major political data. In contrast to revolution, the aim of war was only in rare cases bound up with the notion of freedom; and while it is true that warlike uprisings against a foreign invader have frequently been felt to be sacred, they have never been recognised, either in theory or in practice, as the only just wars. Which of the following revolutions does not prove the assertion “aim of the revolutions was and always has been freedom.” A The French Revolution B The Russian Revolution C The Industrial Revolution D None of these
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