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Mock Practice Test-3

Question
46 out of 80
 

Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.

 

A virtual storm has been sweeping almost all walks of life in the developed countries. The originator of the storm—the robots are coming in a big way. Robots are made in all sorts of shapes and sizes: not typically of human shape and these are now being used in some industries. The automobile industry remains a major user of robots not only for hazardous or arduous work like painting and welding but even for screening light bulbs into instrument panels. The metal industries are heavy users of robots. The impact of the robot revolution may welcome in the service industries where employment is growing fast or in the industries which involve professional hazards to workers.

A Japanese firm had developed a robot to dispose of radio active wastes at nuclear power plants. The computer-controlled robot would soon be put to work cleaning the reactor and replacing spent fuel rods. The hazardous job usually employs 30 workers for two working days. The robot will be able to perform the same task in one day.

The Weseda University of Tokyo has invented the world’s first robot musician, which is capable of playing the electronic organ with its five fingers as skillfully as many other gifted musician.

Robots are also used in human care for the handicapped. A one armed robot responds to commands to prepare meals and perform other household activities for crippled people. Mountain View,
California, has introduced perhaps the smallest ‘micro robot’ which is capable of stuffing leaflets into containers, a task so far executed only by people.

Today, Japan has more sophisticated robots than any other country in the world. They can perform precision work but their performance is not limited to a single type of work. They are designed to perform a virtually unlimited variety of tasks.


Robot is



A a type of doll.

B a musical instrument.

C machine made to act like a man.

D a servant.

Ans. C

Mock Practice Test-3 Flashcard List

80 flashcards
1)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only. Antarctica is a large continent equal in size to Europe and Australia put together. What is remarkable about this continent is that until recently it has been completely isolated from all other continents. In spite of its size, Antarctica had its first temporary year-round inhabitants in the latter of this present century. Although the technological progress since World War-II has now made safe access to the continent possible, it is still not fully explored. But despite the severe cold, it is being studied, and more and more information is becoming available. Explorers and scientists go to this continent to study its geology and mineral resources, and to establish weather stations. Some go for only a year or two. However, if the ship, which is their only means of transport back to the other continents, cannot reach their base, they have to settle down to their work again and hope that the ship will be able to reach them the year after. Ninety-nine per cent of this vast continent is covered with snow or ice, which varies in depth from two feet to two miles. It is calculated that in all, there is an area of 5,000,000 square miles covered with ice. The elevation of the continent is between six and nine thousand feet above sea-level, with mountain peaks, which rise even higher, and its perpetual snow cover intensifies its cold polar climate. All around Antarctica the sea freezes during winter. No ship can reach the coast, except in summer when the ice breaks up and moves with the winds and currents as ice fields. In the northern parts near the coast, the temperature rises above freezing point, but in the southern parts—that is south of the altitude 75° S—ever during summer fall further inland as one climbs to higher levels. A Russian research group settled deep inland recorded a temperature of –125°F. It is also the first free region of the world. By an international treaty, Antarctica has been dedicated to peaceful purposes only, and this has promoted international co-operation in scientific research. This may prove the first step in internationalizing the world in future, and if it does, it would be far more significant in discovering the material and industrial potential of Antarctica. Antarctica is equal in size to A Europe. B Australia. C Europe and Australia taken together. D Europe and half of Australia.
2)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only. Antarctica is a large continent equal in size to Europe and Australia put together. What is remarkable about this continent is that until recently it has been completely isolated from all other continents. In spite of its size, Antarctica had its first temporary year-round inhabitants in the latter of this present century. Although the technological progress since World War-II has now made safe access to the continent possible, it is still not fully explored. But despite the severe cold, it is being studied, and more and more information is becoming available. Explorers and scientists go to this continent to study its geology and mineral resources, and to establish weather stations. Some go for only a year or two. However, if the ship, which is their only means of transport back to the other continents, cannot reach their base, they have to settle down to their work again and hope that the ship will be able to reach them the year after. Ninety-nine per cent of this vast continent is covered with snow or ice, which varies in depth from two feet to two miles. It is calculated that in all, there is an area of 5,000,000 square miles covered with ice. The elevation of the continent is between six and nine thousand feet above sea-level, with mountain peaks, which rise even higher, and its perpetual snow cover intensifies its cold polar climate. All around Antarctica the sea freezes during winter. No ship can reach the coast, except in summer when the ice breaks up and moves with the winds and currents as ice fields. In the northern parts near the coast, the temperature rises above freezing point, but in the southern parts—that is south of the altitude 75° S—ever during summer fall further inland as one climbs to higher levels. A Russian research group settled deep inland recorded a temperature of –125°F. It is also the first free region of the world. By an international treaty, Antarctica has been dedicated to peaceful purposes only, and this has promoted international co-operation in scientific research. This may prove the first step in internationalizing the world in future, and if it does, it would be far more significant in discovering the material and industrial potential of Antarctica. Explorers and scientists go to Antarctica to establish A railway stations. B air stations. C weather stations. D mining.
3)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only. Antarctica is a large continent equal in size to Europe and Australia put together. What is remarkable about this continent is that until recently it has been completely isolated from all other continents. In spite of its size, Antarctica had its first temporary year-round inhabitants in the latter of this present century. Although the technological progress since World War-II has now made safe access to the continent possible, it is still not fully explored. But despite the severe cold, it is being studied, and more and more information is becoming available. Explorers and scientists go to this continent to study its geology and mineral resources, and to establish weather stations. Some go for only a year or two. However, if the ship, which is their only means of transport back to the other continents, cannot reach their base, they have to settle down to their work again and hope that the ship will be able to reach them the year after. Ninety-nine per cent of this vast continent is covered with snow or ice, which varies in depth from two feet to two miles. It is calculated that in all, there is an area of 5,000,000 square miles covered with ice. The elevation of the continent is between six and nine thousand feet above sea-level, with mountain peaks, which rise even higher, and its perpetual snow cover intensifies its cold polar climate. All around Antarctica the sea freezes during winter. No ship can reach the coast, except in summer when the ice breaks up and moves with the winds and currents as ice fields. In the northern parts near the coast, the temperature rises above freezing point, but in the southern parts—that is south of the altitude 75° S—ever during summer fall further inland as one climbs to higher levels. A Russian research group settled deep inland recorded a temperature of –125°F. It is also the first free region of the world. By an international treaty, Antarctica has been dedicated to peaceful purposes only, and this has promoted international co-operation in scientific research. This may prove the first step in internationalizing the world in future, and if it does, it would be far more significant in discovering the material and industrial potential of Antarctica. With the help of ship one can reach there A throughout the year. B only in summer. C only during winter. D none of these
4)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only. Antarctica is a large continent equal in size to Europe and Australia put together. What is remarkable about this continent is that until recently it has been completely isolated from all other continents. In spite of its size, Antarctica had its first temporary year-round inhabitants in the latter of this present century. Although the technological progress since World War-II has now made safe access to the continent possible, it is still not fully explored. But despite the severe cold, it is being studied, and more and more information is becoming available. Explorers and scientists go to this continent to study its geology and mineral resources, and to establish weather stations. Some go for only a year or two. However, if the ship, which is their only means of transport back to the other continents, cannot reach their base, they have to settle down to their work again and hope that the ship will be able to reach them the year after. Ninety-nine per cent of this vast continent is covered with snow or ice, which varies in depth from two feet to two miles. It is calculated that in all, there is an area of 5,000,000 square miles covered with ice. The elevation of the continent is between six and nine thousand feet above sea-level, with mountain peaks, which rise even higher, and its perpetual snow cover intensifies its cold polar climate. All around Antarctica the sea freezes during winter. No ship can reach the coast, except in summer when the ice breaks up and moves with the winds and currents as ice fields. In the northern parts near the coast, the temperature rises above freezing point, but in the southern parts—that is south of the altitude 75° S—ever during summer fall further inland as one climbs to higher levels. A Russian research group settled deep inland recorded a temperature of –125°F. It is also the first free region of the world. By an international treaty, Antarctica has been dedicated to peaceful purposes only, and this has promoted international co-operation in scientific research. This may prove the first step in internationalizing the world in future, and if it does, it would be far more significant in discovering the material and industrial potential of Antarctica. Antarctica has been dedicated to peaceful purpose by A a legal treaty. B an international treaty. C mutual understanding among different nations. D court orders.
5)
If you compare one of the new atomic power stations with the coal-burning power stations of the past that we are used to seeing, you will immediately notice a big difference—everything is so clean. You will also miss the great chimneys and piled of coal and noisy machinery that were part of the old kind of power stations. These are the signs of the new age which are quickly seen, but there are others which take a little longer to notice. If there is no dirt, then the building of the power station can be made to look more beautiful. Bright colours can be used. Calder Hall, in Cumberland, English opened in 1956, is a good example of this. The central buildings of this station which contain the great atomic reactors and are as big as cinemas, have four boilers, or ‘heat-exchangers’, one at each corner of the building. Each of them was a different colour. There is a bright blue one, a yellow and a green one. These colours all help give you a feeling that are seeing something new as you approach the station. It is true there are still two small chimneys on the roof that remind you a little of the funnels of a Mississippi pleasure both, but there are not for smoke or steam. You will never see any gases leaving them. Their only purpose is to pass the cooling air into the sky overhead. Inside the station you will find everything perfectly clear, just like a hospital. There are two reasons for this. The first is that if dirt were allowed to mix with the atomic fuel or in any other way to get into the reactor, it might possibly stop the reactor working, or at least slow it down so that the expensive fuel, which had been spoilt by the dirt, had to be changed for new. The other reasons is that dirt is hard to control. If dirt from inside the atomic pile, by carelessness or some chance, happened to get mixed up with dirt outside, people both inside and outside the power station would be harmed by it. Compared to coal-burning power station, atomic power stations are A more dangerous. B smaller in size. C more colourful. D cleaner and less noisy.
6)
If you compare one of the new atomic power stations with the coal-burning power stations of the past that we are used to seeing, you will immediately notice a big difference—everything is so clean. You will also miss the great chimneys and piled of coal and noisy machinery that were part of the old kind of power stations. These are the signs of the new age which are quickly seen, but there are others which take a little longer to notice. If there is no dirt, then the building of the power station can be made to look more beautiful. Bright colours can be used. Calder Hall, in Cumberland, English opened in 1956, is a good example of this. The central buildings of this station which contain the great atomic reactors and are as big as cinemas, have four boilers, or ‘heat-exchangers’, one at each corner of the building. Each of them was a different colour. There is a bright blue one, a yellow and a green one. These colours all help give you a feeling that are seeing something new as you approach the station. It is true there are still two small chimneys on the roof that remind you a little of the funnels of a Mississippi pleasure both, but there are not for smoke or steam. You will never see any gases leaving them. Their only purpose is to pass the cooling air into the sky overhead. Inside the station you will find everything perfectly clear, just like a hospital. There are two reasons for this. The first is that if dirt were allowed to mix with the atomic fuel or in any other way to get into the reactor, it might possibly stop the reactor working, or at least slow it down so that the expensive fuel, which had been spoilt by the dirt, had to be changed for new. The other reasons is that dirt is hard to control. If dirt from inside the atomic pile, by carelessness or some chance, happened to get mixed up with dirt outside, people both inside and outside the power station would be harmed by it. At Calder Hall there are bright blue, red, yellow and green A power station buildings. B boilers. C atomic reactors. D cinema halls.
7)
If you compare one of the new atomic power stations with the coal-burning power stations of the past that we are used to seeing, you will immediately notice a big difference—everything is so clean. You will also miss the great chimneys and piled of coal and noisy machinery that were part of the old kind of power stations. These are the signs of the new age which are quickly seen, but there are others which take a little longer to notice. If there is no dirt, then the building of the power station can be made to look more beautiful. Bright colours can be used. Calder Hall, in Cumberland, English opened in 1956, is a good example of this. The central buildings of this station which contain the great atomic reactors and are as big as cinemas, have four boilers, or ‘heat-exchangers’, one at each corner of the building. Each of them was a different colour. There is a bright blue one, a yellow and a green one. These colours all help give you a feeling that are seeing something new as you approach the station. It is true there are still two small chimneys on the roof that remind you a little of the funnels of a Mississippi pleasure both, but there are not for smoke or steam. You will never see any gases leaving them. Their only purpose is to pass the cooling air into the sky overhead. Inside the station you will find everything perfectly clear, just like a hospital. There are two reasons for this. The first is that if dirt were allowed to mix with the atomic fuel or in any other way to get into the reactor, it might possibly stop the reactor working, or at least slow it down so that the expensive fuel, which had been spoilt by the dirt, had to be changed for new. The other reasons is that dirt is hard to control. If dirt from inside the atomic pile, by carelessness or some chance, happened to get mixed up with dirt outside, people both inside and outside the power station would be harmed by it. Atomic power station have A big chimneys emitting smoke. B big chimneys emitting steam. C small chimneys emitting cooling air high into the sky. D small chimneys for emitting smoke and steam.
8)
If you compare one of the new atomic power stations with the coal-burning power stations of the past that we are used to seeing, you will immediately notice a big difference—everything is so clean. You will also miss the great chimneys and piled of coal and noisy machinery that were part of the old kind of power stations. These are the signs of the new age which are quickly seen, but there are others which take a little longer to notice. If there is no dirt, then the building of the power station can be made to look more beautiful. Bright colours can be used. Calder Hall, in Cumberland, English opened in 1956, is a good example of this. The central buildings of this station which contain the great atomic reactors and are as big as cinemas, have four boilers, or ‘heat-exchangers’, one at each corner of the building. Each of them was a different colour. There is a bright blue one, a yellow and a green one. These colours all help give you a feeling that are seeing something new as you approach the station. It is true there are still two small chimneys on the roof that remind you a little of the funnels of a Mississippi pleasure both, but there are not for smoke or steam. You will never see any gases leaving them. Their only purpose is to pass the cooling air into the sky overhead. Inside the station you will find everything perfectly clear, just like a hospital. There are two reasons for this. The first is that if dirt were allowed to mix with the atomic fuel or in any other way to get into the reactor, it might possibly stop the reactor working, or at least slow it down so that the expensive fuel, which had been spoilt by the dirt, had to be changed for new. The other reasons is that dirt is hard to control. If dirt from inside the atomic pile, by carelessness or some chance, happened to get mixed up with dirt outside, people both inside and outside the power station would be harmed by it. Atomic power plants should be dust free, as A dust damages the brightness of the buildings. B coal mixed with dust do not produce the required heat. C dust might affect the working of the reactors and cause harm to the people near the power stations. D none of the above.
9)
If you compare one of the new atomic power stations with the coal-burning power stations of the past that we are used to seeing, you will immediately notice a big difference—everything is so clean. You will also miss the great chimneys and piled of coal and noisy machinery that were part of the old kind of power stations. These are the signs of the new age which are quickly seen, but there are others which take a little longer to notice. If there is no dirt, then the building of the power station can be made to look more beautiful. Bright colours can be used. Calder Hall, in Cumberland, English opened in 1956, is a good example of this. The central buildings of this station which contain the great atomic reactors and are as big as cinemas, have four boilers, or ‘heat-exchangers’, one at each corner of the building. Each of them was a different colour. There is a bright blue one, a yellow and a green one. These colours all help give you a feeling that are seeing something new as you approach the station. It is true there are still two small chimneys on the roof that remind you a little of the funnels of a Mississippi pleasure both, but there are not for smoke or steam. You will never see any gases leaving them. Their only purpose is to pass the cooling air into the sky overhead. Inside the station you will find everything perfectly clear, just like a hospital. There are two reasons for this. The first is that if dirt were allowed to mix with the atomic fuel or in any other way to get into the reactor, it might possibly stop the reactor working, or at least slow it down so that the expensive fuel, which had been spoilt by the dirt, had to be changed for new. The other reasons is that dirt is hard to control. If dirt from inside the atomic pile, by carelessness or some chance, happened to get mixed up with dirt outside, people both inside and outside the power station would be harmed by it. A sample of 100 people were surveyed for the use of computers, cell phones and credit cards. 33 people had credit cards, 41 computers and 43 cell phones. If 11 had none of three and 36 had more than one, how many people had all the three? A 10 B 8 C 12 D 15
10)
If you compare one of the new atomic power stations with the coal-burning power stations of the past that we are used to seeing, you will immediately notice a big difference—everything is so clean. You will also miss the great chimneys and piled of coal and noisy machinery that were part of the old kind of power stations. These are the signs of the new age which are quickly seen, but there are others which take a little longer to notice. If there is no dirt, then the building of the power station can be made to look more beautiful. Bright colours can be used. Calder Hall, in Cumberland, English opened in 1956, is a good example of this. The central buildings of this station which contain the great atomic reactors and are as big as cinemas, have four boilers, or ‘heat-exchangers’, one at each corner of the building. Each of them was a different colour. There is a bright blue one, a yellow and a green one. These colours all help give you a feeling that are seeing something new as you approach the station. It is true there are still two small chimneys on the roof that remind you a little of the funnels of a Mississippi pleasure both, but there are not for smoke or steam. You will never see any gases leaving them. Their only purpose is to pass the cooling air into the sky overhead. Inside the station you will find everything perfectly clear, just like a hospital. There are two reasons for this. The first is that if dirt were allowed to mix with the atomic fuel or in any other way to get into the reactor, it might possibly stop the reactor working, or at least slow it down so that the expensive fuel, which had been spoilt by the dirt, had to be changed for new. The other reasons is that dirt is hard to control. If dirt from inside the atomic pile, by carelessness or some chance, happened to get mixed up with dirt outside, people both inside and outside the power station would be harmed by it. A right circular cylinder just encloses a sphere of radius r as shown in the figure. The curved surface area of the cylinder is: A 2πr2 B 4πr2 C 6πr2 D 8πr2
11)
If you compare one of the new atomic power stations with the coal-burning power stations of the past that we are used to seeing, you will immediately notice a big difference—everything is so clean. You will also miss the great chimneys and piled of coal and noisy machinery that were part of the old kind of power stations. These are the signs of the new age which are quickly seen, but there are others which take a little longer to notice. If there is no dirt, then the building of the power station can be made to look more beautiful. Bright colours can be used. Calder Hall, in Cumberland, English opened in 1956, is a good example of this. The central buildings of this station which contain the great atomic reactors and are as big as cinemas, have four boilers, or ‘heat-exchangers’, one at each corner of the building. Each of them was a different colour. There is a bright blue one, a yellow and a green one. These colours all help give you a feeling that are seeing something new as you approach the station. It is true there are still two small chimneys on the roof that remind you a little of the funnels of a Mississippi pleasure both, but there are not for smoke or steam. You will never see any gases leaving them. Their only purpose is to pass the cooling air into the sky overhead. Inside the station you will find everything perfectly clear, just like a hospital. There are two reasons for this. The first is that if dirt were allowed to mix with the atomic fuel or in any other way to get into the reactor, it might possibly stop the reactor working, or at least slow it down so that the expensive fuel, which had been spoilt by the dirt, had to be changed for new. The other reasons is that dirt is hard to control. If dirt from inside the atomic pile, by carelessness or some chance, happened to get mixed up with dirt outside, people both inside and outside the power station would be harmed by it. A drawer contains two coins: one coin has head on both the sides. The other coin has a head on one side and a tail on the other side. One coin is drawn from the drawer and its face is observed. If the face is head, what is the probability that the other face is head also? A B C D
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only. The factor of geographical distribution is equally, possibly even more, significant that English is spoken as a first or native language on at least four continents of the world, Russian on two, Chinese and the Indian languages on one. English is without question the closest approach to a world language today. It goes without saying that no two persons ever have an identical command of their common language. Certainly they have not precisely the same vocabulary. There are at least minor differences in pronunciation, indeed the same individual will not pronounce his vowels and consonants in absolutely identical fashion every time he utters them. Everyone possesses, in addition, certain individual traits of grammatical form and syntactical order, constituting that peculiar and personal quality of language which we term as style. All of this is implicit in the well-known phrase, ‘Style is the man.’ No men are identical, no two styles are the same. If this be true of but two persons, the potential of differences resident in a language spoken by more than 200 million truly staggers imagination. According to some authorities, A more people speak Chinese dialects than English. B more people speak English as an auxiliary language than as a first language. C more people speak English in the UK than in England. D about one-fourth of the world’s population speaks English.
17)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only. The factor of geographical distribution is equally, possibly even more, significant that English is spoken as a first or native language on at least four continents of the world, Russian on two, Chinese and the Indian languages on one. English is without question the closest approach to a world language today. It goes without saying that no two persons ever have an identical command of their common language. Certainly they have not precisely the same vocabulary. There are at least minor differences in pronunciation, indeed the same individual will not pronounce his vowels and consonants in absolutely identical fashion every time he utters them. Everyone possesses, in addition, certain individual traits of grammatical form and syntactical order, constituting that peculiar and personal quality of language which we term as style. All of this is implicit in the well-known phrase, ‘Style is the man.’ No men are identical, no two styles are the same. If this be true of but two persons, the potential of differences resident in a language spoken by more than 200 million truly staggers imagination. The author argues that English is the closest approach to a world language because A there are more native speakers of English than of any other language. B english has less number of mutually unintelligible dialects. C the geographical distribution of English covers a much greater area. D other languages are much too complex to be world language.
18)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only. The factor of geographical distribution is equally, possibly even more, significant that English is spoken as a first or native language on at least four continents of the world, Russian on two, Chinese and the Indian languages on one. English is without question the closest approach to a world language today. It goes without saying that no two persons ever have an identical command of their common language. Certainly they have not precisely the same vocabulary. There are at least minor differences in pronunciation, indeed the same individual will not pronounce his vowels and consonants in absolutely identical fashion every time he utters them. Everyone possesses, in addition, certain individual traits of grammatical form and syntactical order, constituting that peculiar and personal quality of language which we term as style. All of this is implicit in the well-known phrase, ‘Style is the man.’ No men are identical, no two styles are the same. If this be true of but two persons, the potential of differences resident in a language spoken by more than 200 million truly staggers imagination. The fact that the same individual will not pronounce his vowels and consonants identically every time shows that A literary style varies from person to person. B mutual intelligibility is a myth. C vocabulary varies from individual to individual. D no two persons speak the same language exactly the same way.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   White cement is the basic raw material for producing cement tiles and cement paint which are used extensively in building construction. The main consumers of white cement are, therefore, cement tile and cement paint manufacturing units. These consumers, mostly in the small scale sector, are today facing a major crisis because of a significant increase in the price of white cement during a short period. The present annual licensed production capacity of white and gray cement in the country is approximately 3.5 lakh tones. The average demand is 2–2.5 tones. This means that there is idle capacity to the turn of one lakh tones of more. The price rise is, therefore, not a phenomenon arising out of inadequate production capacity but evidently because of artificial scarcity created by the manufacturers in their self-interest. The main reason for the continuing spurt in cement price is its decontrol. As it is, there is stiff competition in the cement paint and tile manufacturing business. Any further price revision at this stage is bound to have a severe adverse impact on the market conditions. The Government should take adequate steps to ensure that suitable controls are brought in. Else it should allow import of cement. Why is the price of cement going up? A Because the Government is controlling the quota. B Because of export of white cement. C Because of the large usage of white cement. D None of these.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   White cement is the basic raw material for producing cement tiles and cement paint which are used extensively in building construction. The main consumers of white cement are, therefore, cement tile and cement paint manufacturing units. These consumers, mostly in the small scale sector, are today facing a major crisis because of a significant increase in the price of white cement during a short period. The present annual licensed production capacity of white and gray cement in the country is approximately 3.5 lakh tones. The average demand is 2–2.5 tones. This means that there is idle capacity to the turn of one lakh tones of more. The price rise is, therefore, not a phenomenon arising out of inadequate production capacity but evidently because of artificial scarcity created by the manufacturers in their self-interest. The main reason for the continuing spurt in cement price is its decontrol. As it is, there is stiff competition in the cement paint and tile manufacturing business. Any further price revision at this stage is bound to have a severe adverse impact on the market conditions. The Government should take adequate steps to ensure that suitable controls are brought in. Else it should allow import of cement. Which of the following statements is false according to the passage? A Price rise in white cement would increase the price of cement paint. B White cement is a controlled product. C Increase in price of white cement is not because of production problem. D Price rise in white cement would upset cement tile market.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   White cement is the basic raw material for producing cement tiles and cement paint which are used extensively in building construction. The main consumers of white cement are, therefore, cement tile and cement paint manufacturing units. These consumers, mostly in the small scale sector, are today facing a major crisis because of a significant increase in the price of white cement during a short period. The present annual licensed production capacity of white and gray cement in the country is approximately 3.5 lakh tones. The average demand is 2–2.5 tones. This means that there is idle capacity to the turn of one lakh tones of more. The price rise is, therefore, not a phenomenon arising out of inadequate production capacity but evidently because of artificial scarcity created by the manufacturers in their self-interest. The main reason for the continuing spurt in cement price is its decontrol. As it is, there is stiff competition in the cement paint and tile manufacturing business. Any further price revision at this stage is bound to have a severe adverse impact on the market conditions. The Government should take adequate steps to ensure that suitable controls are brought in. Else it should allow import of cement. What is the crisis being faced by the cement tile manufacturers as described in the passage? A White cement is priced very low. B White cement is not of good quality. C White cement usage is high. D White cement prices are very high.
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A far-reaching arms control agreement that will cut sharply the stockpiles of nuclear weapons of United States and Russia and for the first time reduce intercontinental ballistic missiles, emerged from the summit level talks between both the countries. Under the agreement reached between the two Presidents, Mr. George Bush of the US and Mr. Yeltsin of Russia in Washington on June 16, 1992, the two countries have agreed to cut down their nuclear stockpiles to no more than 3,500 warheads each ignoring the contrary advice given by their military advisers. Both countries will reduce their nuclear arsenals between 3,000 and 3,500 in two phases but not later than the year 2003. Today, both the US and Russia have 22,500 warheads—a staggering number when seen in the context of Washington’s role in preventing other nations from acquiring sophisticated technology. The agreement reached between the two countries is no doubt a big step forward. The agreement will, however, keep the world waiting for another 10 to 12 years before the stock pile of nuclear warheads with either of the US or Russia would drop to 3,500 which is about one-third of their present arsenal. This will still be a menacing number even a decade later. All land-based missiles, the foundation of Russia’s arsenal, will be sent to the scrap yard. Moscow will thus surrender its first strike capability while leaving sea-based missiles, the backbone of the US strategic tripod, untouched. Noneth less, the accord means both sides will find it harder to initiate a nuclear exchange. This alone means the world can sleep that much easier. The United States and Russia A signed an agreement to exchange military know how. B greed to cut down their present stock of nuclear arms shortly. C dismissed any possibility of cutting their arms-stocks down. D shelved the arms control agreement for even.
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A far-reaching arms control agreement that will cut sharply the stockpiles of nuclear weapons of United States and Russia and for the first time reduce intercontinental ballistic missiles, emerged from the summit level talks between both the countries. Under the agreement reached between the two Presidents, Mr. George Bush of the US and Mr. Yeltsin of Russia in Washington on June 16, 1992, the two countries have agreed to cut down their nuclear stockpiles to no more than 3,500 warheads each ignoring the contrary advice given by their military advisers. Both countries will reduce their nuclear arsenals between 3,000 and 3,500 in two phases but not later than the year 2003. Today, both the US and Russia have 22,500 warheads—a staggering number when seen in the context of Washington’s role in preventing other nations from acquiring sophisticated technology. The agreement reached between the two countries is no doubt a big step forward. The agreement will, however, keep the world waiting for another 10 to 12 years before the stock pile of nuclear warheads with either of the US or Russia would drop to 3,500 which is about one-third of their present arsenal. This will still be a menacing number even a decade later. All land-based missiles, the foundation of Russia’s arsenal, will be sent to the scrap yard. Moscow will thus surrender its first strike capability while leaving sea-based missiles, the backbone of the US strategic tripod, untouched. Noneth less, the accord means both sides will find it harder to initiate a nuclear exchange. This alone means the world can sleep that much easier. The development took place A early 1993. B early 1992. C towards the end of 1992. D in the middle of the sixth month of 1992.
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A far-reaching arms control agreement that will cut sharply the stockpiles of nuclear weapons of United States and Russia and for the first time reduce intercontinental ballistic missiles, emerged from the summit level talks between both the countries. Under the agreement reached between the two Presidents, Mr. George Bush of the US and Mr. Yeltsin of Russia in Washington on June 16, 1992, the two countries have agreed to cut down their nuclear stockpiles to no more than 3,500 warheads each ignoring the contrary advice given by their military advisers. Both countries will reduce their nuclear arsenals between 3,000 and 3,500 in two phases but not later than the year 2003. Today, both the US and Russia have 22,500 warheads—a staggering number when seen in the context of Washington’s role in preventing other nations from acquiring sophisticated technology. The agreement reached between the two countries is no doubt a big step forward. The agreement will, however, keep the world waiting for another 10 to 12 years before the stock pile of nuclear warheads with either of the US or Russia would drop to 3,500 which is about one-third of their present arsenal. This will still be a menacing number even a decade later. All land-based missiles, the foundation of Russia’s arsenal, will be sent to the scrap yard. Moscow will thus surrender its first strike capability while leaving sea-based missiles, the backbone of the US strategic tripod, untouched. Noneth less, the accord means both sides will find it harder to initiate a nuclear exchange. This alone means the world can sleep that much easier. The US and Russia A acted according to the advice given by their military advisers. B acted against the advice given by their military advisers. C come to the agreement without consulting their military advisers. D acted arbitrarily.
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A far-reaching arms control agreement that will cut sharply the stockpiles of nuclear weapons of United States and Russia and for the first time reduce intercontinental ballistic missiles, emerged from the summit level talks between both the countries. Under the agreement reached between the two Presidents, Mr. George Bush of the US and Mr. Yeltsin of Russia in Washington on June 16, 1992, the two countries have agreed to cut down their nuclear stockpiles to no more than 3,500 warheads each ignoring the contrary advice given by their military advisers. Both countries will reduce their nuclear arsenals between 3,000 and 3,500 in two phases but not later than the year 2003. Today, both the US and Russia have 22,500 warheads—a staggering number when seen in the context of Washington’s role in preventing other nations from acquiring sophisticated technology. The agreement reached between the two countries is no doubt a big step forward. The agreement will, however, keep the world waiting for another 10 to 12 years before the stock pile of nuclear warheads with either of the US or Russia would drop to 3,500 which is about one-third of their present arsenal. This will still be a menacing number even a decade later. All land-based missiles, the foundation of Russia’s arsenal, will be sent to the scrap yard. Moscow will thus surrender its first strike capability while leaving sea-based missiles, the backbone of the US strategic tripod, untouched. Noneth less, the accord means both sides will find it harder to initiate a nuclear exchange. This alone means the world can sleep that much easier. To find the US and Russia acting true to the agreement the world will have to wait A for nearly over a decade. B for half a decade. C for at least two decades. D for a lifetime.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   A virtual storm has been sweeping almost all walks of life in the developed countries. The originator of the storm—the robots are coming in a big way. Robots are made in all sorts of shapes and sizes: not typically of human shape and these are now being used in some industries. The automobile industry remains a major user of robots not only for hazardous or arduous work like painting and welding but even for screening light bulbs into instrument panels. The metal industries are heavy users of robots. The impact of the robot revolution may welcome in the service industries where employment is growing fast or in the industries which involve professional hazards to workers. A Japanese firm had developed a robot to dispose of radio active wastes at nuclear power plants. The computer-controlled robot would soon be put to work cleaning the reactor and replacing spent fuel rods. The hazardous job usually employs 30 workers for two working days. The robot will be able to perform the same task in one day. The Weseda University of Tokyo has invented the world’s first robot musician, which is capable of playing the electronic organ with its five fingers as skillfully as many other gifted musician. Robots are also used in human care for the handicapped. A one armed robot responds to commands to prepare meals and perform other household activities for crippled people. Mountain View, California, has introduced perhaps the smallest ‘micro robot’ which is capable of stuffing leaflets into containers, a task so far executed only by people. Today, Japan has more sophisticated robots than any other country in the world. They can perform precision work but their performance is not limited to a single type of work. They are designed to perform a virtually unlimited variety of tasks. Robot is A a type of doll. B a musical instrument. C machine made to act like a man. D a servant.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   A virtual storm has been sweeping almost all walks of life in the developed countries. The originator of the storm—the robots are coming in a big way. Robots are made in all sorts of shapes and sizes: not typically of human shape and these are now being used in some industries. The automobile industry remains a major user of robots not only for hazardous or arduous work like painting and welding but even for screening light bulbs into instrument panels. The metal industries are heavy users of robots. The impact of the robot revolution may welcome in the service industries where employment is growing fast or in the industries which involve professional hazards to workers. A Japanese firm had developed a robot to dispose of radio active wastes at nuclear power plants. The computer-controlled robot would soon be put to work cleaning the reactor and replacing spent fuel rods. The hazardous job usually employs 30 workers for two working days. The robot will be able to perform the same task in one day. The Weseda University of Tokyo has invented the world’s first robot musician, which is capable of playing the electronic organ with its five fingers as skillfully as many other gifted musician. Robots are also used in human care for the handicapped. A one armed robot responds to commands to prepare meals and perform other household activities for crippled people. Mountain View, California, has introduced perhaps the smallest ‘micro robot’ which is capable of stuffing leaflets into containers, a task so far executed only by people. Today, Japan has more sophisticated robots than any other country in the world. They can perform precision work but their performance is not limited to a single type of work. They are designed to perform a virtually unlimited variety of tasks. The major use of robots now is in A that require minimum physical labour. B involving professional hazards to workers. C requiring precision brain work. D hard labour.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   A virtual storm has been sweeping almost all walks of life in the developed countries. The originator of the storm—the robots are coming in a big way. Robots are made in all sorts of shapes and sizes: not typically of human shape and these are now being used in some industries. The automobile industry remains a major user of robots not only for hazardous or arduous work like painting and welding but even for screening light bulbs into instrument panels. The metal industries are heavy users of robots. The impact of the robot revolution may welcome in the service industries where employment is growing fast or in the industries which involve professional hazards to workers. A Japanese firm had developed a robot to dispose of radio active wastes at nuclear power plants. The computer-controlled robot would soon be put to work cleaning the reactor and replacing spent fuel rods. The hazardous job usually employs 30 workers for two working days. The robot will be able to perform the same task in one day. The Weseda University of Tokyo has invented the world’s first robot musician, which is capable of playing the electronic organ with its five fingers as skillfully as many other gifted musician. Robots are also used in human care for the handicapped. A one armed robot responds to commands to prepare meals and perform other household activities for crippled people. Mountain View, California, has introduced perhaps the smallest ‘micro robot’ which is capable of stuffing leaflets into containers, a task so far executed only by people. Today, Japan has more sophisticated robots than any other country in the world. They can perform precision work but their performance is not limited to a single type of work. They are designed to perform a virtually unlimited variety of tasks. A robot musician A manufactures musical instruments. B plays musical instruments. C helps in pharmaceutical industries. D dance to music.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   A virtual storm has been sweeping almost all walks of life in the developed countries. The originator of the storm—the robots are coming in a big way. Robots are made in all sorts of shapes and sizes: not typically of human shape and these are now being used in some industries. The automobile industry remains a major user of robots not only for hazardous or arduous work like painting and welding but even for screening light bulbs into instrument panels. The metal industries are heavy users of robots. The impact of the robot revolution may welcome in the service industries where employment is growing fast or in the industries which involve professional hazards to workers. A Japanese firm had developed a robot to dispose of radio active wastes at nuclear power plants. The computer-controlled robot would soon be put to work cleaning the reactor and replacing spent fuel rods. The hazardous job usually employs 30 workers for two working days. The robot will be able to perform the same task in one day. The Weseda University of Tokyo has invented the world’s first robot musician, which is capable of playing the electronic organ with its five fingers as skillfully as many other gifted musician. Robots are also used in human care for the handicapped. A one armed robot responds to commands to prepare meals and perform other household activities for crippled people. Mountain View, California, has introduced perhaps the smallest ‘micro robot’ which is capable of stuffing leaflets into containers, a task so far executed only by people. Today, Japan has more sophisticated robots than any other country in the world. They can perform precision work but their performance is not limited to a single type of work. They are designed to perform a virtually unlimited variety of tasks. Japanese robots are more A sophisticated. B delicate than those made by other countries. C useful. D not useful.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Apart from the case in which culture and direct utility can be combined, there is indirect utility of various kinds in the possession of knowledge which does not contribute to technical efficiency. I think some of the worst features of the modern world could be improved by a greater ecouragement of such knowledge and less ruthless pursuit of more professional competence. When conscious activity is wholly conscious activity is wholly concentrated on one definite purpose the ultimate result, for most people is lack of balance accompanied by some form of nervous disorder. The men who directed German policy during the war made mistakes, for example, as regards the submarine campaign which brought America on the side of the Allies, which any person coming fresh to the subject could have seen to be unwise, but which they could not judge sanely owing to mental concentration and lack of holidays. The same sort of thing may be seen wherever bodies of men attempt tasks which put a prolonged strain upon spontaneous. Men as well as children have need of play, that is to say, of periods of activity having no purpose, present enjoyment. But if play is to serve its purpose, it must be possible to find pleasure and interest in matters not connected with work. Better economic organization allowing mankind to benefit by the productivity of machines, should lead to a very great increase of leisure, and much leisure is apt be tedious except to those who have considerable intelligent activities and interests. If a leisured population is to be happy it must be an educated population, and must be educated with a view to mental enjoyment as well as to the direct usefulness of technical knowledge. What is the significance of the phrase “ruthless pursuit” when used, with regard to professional competence. A pursuit of knowledge that makes us ruthless B dogmatic pursuit of knowledge C foolish pursuit D Useless pursuit
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Apart from the case in which culture and direct utility can be combined, there is indirect utility of various kinds in the possession of knowledge which does not contribute to technical efficiency. I think some of the worst features of the modern world could be improved by a greater ecouragement of such knowledge and less ruthless pursuit of more professional competence. When conscious activity is wholly conscious activity is wholly concentrated on one definite purpose the ultimate result, for most people is lack of balance accompanied by some form of nervous disorder. The men who directed German policy during the war made mistakes, for example, as regards the submarine campaign which brought America on the side of the Allies, which any person coming fresh to the subject could have seen to be unwise, but which they could not judge sanely owing to mental concentration and lack of holidays. The same sort of thing may be seen wherever bodies of men attempt tasks which put a prolonged strain upon spontaneous. Men as well as children have need of play, that is to say, of periods of activity having no purpose, present enjoyment. But if play is to serve its purpose, it must be possible to find pleasure and interest in matters not connected with work. Better economic organization allowing mankind to benefit by the productivity of machines, should lead to a very great increase of leisure, and much leisure is apt be tedious except to those who have considerable intelligent activities and interests. If a leisured population is to be happy it must be an educated population, and must be educated with a view to mental enjoyment as well as to the direct usefulness of technical knowledge. The author does not say: A Children need play B Increased leisure is the result of better economic organisation C Leisured people can be happy if educated D Technical knowledge can improve the world
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   However important we may regard school life to be there is gainsaying the fact that children spend more time at home than in the classroom. Therefore, the great influence of parents, can be ignored or discounted by the teacher. They can become strong allies of the school personnel or they can consciously or unconsciously hinder and thwart curricular objectives. Administrators have been aware of the need to keep parents apprised of the new methods used in schools. Many principals have conducted workshops explaining such writing and developmental mathematics. Moreover, the classroom teacher, with the permission of the supervisor, can also play an important role in enlightening parents. The informal tea and the many interviews carried on during the year, as well as new ways of reporting pupils’ progress, can significantly aid in achieving a harmonious interplay between school and home. To illustrate, suppose a father has been drilling junior in arithmetic processes night after night. In a friendly interview, the teacher can help the parent sublimate his natural paternal interest into productive channels. He might be persuaded to let junior participate in discussing the family budget, buying the food, using a yard stick or measuring cup at home, setting the clock, calculating mileage on a trip and engaging in scores of other activities that have a mathematical basis. If the father follows the advice, it is reasonable to assume that he will soon realize his son is making satisfactory progress in mathematics, and at the same time, enjoying the work. Too often, however, teacher’s conference with parents are devoted to petty accounts of children’s misdemeanors, complaints about laziness and poor work habits, and suggestion for penalties or rewards at home, What is needed is a more creative approach in which the teacher, as a professional adviser, plants ideas in parents’ minds for the best utilization of the many hours that the child spends out of the classroom. In this way, the school and the home join forces in fostering the fullest development of youngsters’ capacities. The author discusses the fact that A parents drill their children too much in arithmetic. B principals have explained the new art programme to parents. C a father can have his son help him construction articles at home. D a parent’s misguided efforts can be properly directed.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   However important we may regard school life to be there is gainsaying the fact that children spend more time at home than in the classroom. Therefore, the great influence of parents, can be ignored or discounted by the teacher. They can become strong allies of the school personnel or they can consciously or unconsciously hinder and thwart curricular objectives. Administrators have been aware of the need to keep parents apprised of the new methods used in schools. Many principals have conducted workshops explaining such writing and developmental mathematics. Moreover, the classroom teacher, with the permission of the supervisor, can also play an important role in enlightening parents. The informal tea and the many interviews carried on during the year, as well as new ways of reporting pupils’ progress, can significantly aid in achieving a harmonious interplay between school and home. To illustrate, suppose a father has been drilling junior in arithmetic processes night after night. In a friendly interview, the teacher can help the parent sublimate his natural paternal interest into productive channels. He might be persuaded to let junior participate in discussing the family budget, buying the food, using a yard stick or measuring cup at home, setting the clock, calculating mileage on a trip and engaging in scores of other activities that have a mathematical basis. If the father follows the advice, it is reasonable to assume that he will soon realize his son is making satisfactory progress in mathematics, and at the same time, enjoying the work. Too often, however, teacher’s conference with parents are devoted to petty accounts of children’s misdemeanors, complaints about laziness and poor work habits, and suggestion for penalties or rewards at home, What is needed is a more creative approach in which the teacher, as a professional adviser, plants ideas in parents’ minds for the best utilization of the many hours that the child spends out of the classroom. In this way, the school and the home join forces in fostering the fullest development of youngsters’ capacities. It can reasonably be inferred that the author A is satified with present relationship between home and school B feels that the traditional programme in mathematics is slightly superior to the development programme C believes that schools are woefully lacking in guidance personnel D feels that parent-teacher interviews can be made much more constructive than they are at present
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   However important we may regard school life to be there is gainsaying the fact that children spend more time at home than in the classroom. Therefore, the great influence of parents, can be ignored or discounted by the teacher. They can become strong allies of the school personnel or they can consciously or unconsciously hinder and thwart curricular objectives. Administrators have been aware of the need to keep parents apprised of the new methods used in schools. Many principals have conducted workshops explaining such writing and developmental mathematics. Moreover, the classroom teacher, with the permission of the supervisor, can also play an important role in enlightening parents. The informal tea and the many interviews carried on during the year, as well as new ways of reporting pupils’ progress, can significantly aid in achieving a harmonious interplay between school and home. To illustrate, suppose a father has been drilling junior in arithmetic processes night after night. In a friendly interview, the teacher can help the parent sublimate his natural paternal interest into productive channels. He might be persuaded to let junior participate in discussing the family budget, buying the food, using a yard stick or measuring cup at home, setting the clock, calculating mileage on a trip and engaging in scores of other activities that have a mathematical basis. If the father follows the advice, it is reasonable to assume that he will soon realize his son is making satisfactory progress in mathematics, and at the same time, enjoying the work. Too often, however, teacher’s conference with parents are devoted to petty accounts of children’s misdemeanors, complaints about laziness and poor work habits, and suggestion for penalties or rewards at home, What is needed is a more creative approach in which the teacher, as a professional adviser, plants ideas in parents’ minds for the best utilization of the many hours that the child spends out of the classroom. In this way, the school and the home join forces in fostering the fullest development of youngsters’ capacities. A method of communication not mentioned or intimated by the author, is the A newtype of reportcard B parent-teacher interview C informal tea D demonstration lesson
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