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Mock Practice Test-7

Question
32 out of 80
 

Read the following informations carefully and answer these questions given below:

There are six cities A, B, C, D, E and F. A is not a hill station. B and E are not historical places. D is not an industrial city. A and D are not historical cities. A and B are not alike.


Which city is a hill station and an industrial centre but not a historical place?



A E

B F

C A

D B

Ans. A

Mock Practice Test-7 Flashcard List

80 flashcards
1)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The first important point about how children learn prejudice is that they do. They aren’t born that way, though some people think prejudice is innate and like to quote the old saying, “You can’t change human nature.” But you can change it. We now know that very small children are free of prejudice. Studies of school children have shown that prejudice is slight or absent among children in the first and second grades. After this, it may fall off again in adolescence. Other studies have shown that, on an average, young adults are much freer of prejudice than older ones. In the early stages of picking up prejudice, children mix it with ignorance which, as I’ve said, should be distinguished from prejudice. A child, as he begins to study the world around him, tries to organise his experiences. Doing this, he begins to classify things and people and begins to form connections—or what psychologists call associations. He needs to do this because he saves time and effort by putting things and people into categories. But unless he classifies correctly, his categories will mislead rather than guide him. For example, if a child learns that “all fires are hot and dangerous,” fires have been put firmly into the category of things to be watched carefully—and thus he can save himself from harm. But if he learns a category like “Negroes are lazy” or “foreigners are fools,” he‘s learned generalisations that mislead because they’re unreliable. The thing is that, when we use categories, we need to remember the exceptions and differences, the individual variations that qualify the usefulness of all generalisations. Some fires, for example, are hotter and more dangerous than others. If people had avoided all fires as dangerous, we would never have had central heating. More importantly, we can ill afford to treat people of any given group as generally alike, even when it’s possible to make some accurate generalisations about them. So when a child first begins to group things together, it’s advisable that he learns differences as well as similarities. For example, basic among the distinctions he draws is the division into “good” and “bad”, which he makes largely on the grounds of what his parents do and say about things and the people. Thus, he may learn that dirt is “bad” because his mother washes him every time he gets dirty. By extension, seeing a Negro child, he might point to him and say, “Bad child”, for the Negro child’s face is brown, hence, unwashed and dirty, and so, “bad” We call this prelogical thing, and all of us go through this phase before we learn to think more effectively. But some people remain at this stage and never learn that things seem alike, such as dirt and brown pigmen are really quite different. Whether a child graduates from his stage to correct thinking or to prejudicial thinking, depends to a great extent on his experiences with his parents and teachers. Which one of the following statements is true? A Children upto the age of six or seven years are less likely to be prejudiced B One is born with prejudices C As one grows, prejudices fall off D One’s prejudices remain forever
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The first important point about how children learn prejudice is that they do. They aren’t born that way, though some people think prejudice is innate and like to quote the old saying, “You can’t change human nature.” But you can change it. We now know that very small children are free of prejudice. Studies of school children have shown that prejudice is slight or absent among children in the first and second grades. After this, it may fall off again in adolescence. Other studies have shown that, on an average, young adults are much freer of prejudice than older ones. In the early stages of picking up prejudice, children mix it with ignorance which, as I’ve said, should be distinguished from prejudice. A child, as he begins to study the world around him, tries to organise his experiences. Doing this, he begins to classify things and people and begins to form connections—or what psychologists call associations. He needs to do this because he saves time and effort by putting things and people into categories. But unless he classifies correctly, his categories will mislead rather than guide him. For example, if a child learns that “all fires are hot and dangerous,” fires have been put firmly into the category of things to be watched carefully—and thus he can save himself from harm. But if he learns a category like “Negroes are lazy” or “foreigners are fools,” he‘s learned generalisations that mislead because they’re unreliable. The thing is that, when we use categories, we need to remember the exceptions and differences, the individual variations that qualify the usefulness of all generalisations. Some fires, for example, are hotter and more dangerous than others. If people had avoided all fires as dangerous, we would never have had central heating. More importantly, we can ill afford to treat people of any given group as generally alike, even when it’s possible to make some accurate generalisations about them. So when a child first begins to group things together, it’s advisable that he learns differences as well as similarities. For example, basic among the distinctions he draws is the division into “good” and “bad”, which he makes largely on the grounds of what his parents do and say about things and the people. Thus, he may learn that dirt is “bad” because his mother washes him every time he gets dirty. By extension, seeing a Negro child, he might point to him and say, “Bad child”, for the Negro child’s face is brown, hence, unwashed and dirty, and so, “bad” We call this prelogical thing, and all of us go through this phase before we learn to think more effectively. But some people remain at this stage and never learn that things seem alike, such as dirt and brown pigmen are really quite different. Whether a child graduates from his stage to correct thinking or to prejudicial thinking, depends to a great extent on his experiences with his parents and teachers. While making categories, the important things to remember are A Only differences B Only exceptions C Exceptions and differences D Only similarities
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The first important point about how children learn prejudice is that they do. They aren’t born that way, though some people think prejudice is innate and like to quote the old saying, “You can’t change human nature.” But you can change it. We now know that very small children are free of prejudice. Studies of school children have shown that prejudice is slight or absent among children in the first and second grades. After this, it may fall off again in adolescence. Other studies have shown that, on an average, young adults are much freer of prejudice than older ones. In the early stages of picking up prejudice, children mix it with ignorance which, as I’ve said, should be distinguished from prejudice. A child, as he begins to study the world around him, tries to organise his experiences. Doing this, he begins to classify things and people and begins to form connections—or what psychologists call associations. He needs to do this because he saves time and effort by putting things and people into categories. But unless he classifies correctly, his categories will mislead rather than guide him. For example, if a child learns that “all fires are hot and dangerous,” fires have been put firmly into the category of things to be watched carefully—and thus he can save himself from harm. But if he learns a category like “Negroes are lazy” or “foreigners are fools,” he‘s learned generalisations that mislead because they’re unreliable. The thing is that, when we use categories, we need to remember the exceptions and differences, the individual variations that qualify the usefulness of all generalisations. Some fires, for example, are hotter and more dangerous than others. If people had avoided all fires as dangerous, we would never have had central heating. More importantly, we can ill afford to treat people of any given group as generally alike, even when it’s possible to make some accurate generalisations about them. So when a child first begins to group things together, it’s advisable that he learns differences as well as similarities. For example, basic among the distinctions he draws is the division into “good” and “bad”, which he makes largely on the grounds of what his parents do and say about things and the people. Thus, he may learn that dirt is “bad” because his mother washes him every time he gets dirty. By extension, seeing a Negro child, he might point to him and say, “Bad child”, for the Negro child’s face is brown, hence, unwashed and dirty, and so, “bad” We call this prelogical thing, and all of us go through this phase before we learn to think more effectively. But some people remain at this stage and never learn that things seem alike, such as dirt and brown pigmen are really quite different. Whether a child graduates from his stage to correct thinking or to prejudicial thinking, depends to a great extent on his experiences with his parents and teachers. Which one of the following statements is not true? A It is possible to shed prejudices at any stage B Parents can help children to correct thinking C Prejudice and ignorance are not the same D Things that seem alike are necessarily similar
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The first important point about how children learn prejudice is that they do. They aren’t born that way, though some people think prejudice is innate and like to quote the old saying, “You can’t change human nature.” But you can change it. We now know that very small children are free of prejudice. Studies of school children have shown that prejudice is slight or absent among children in the first and second grades. After this, it may fall off again in adolescence. Other studies have shown that, on an average, young adults are much freer of prejudice than older ones. In the early stages of picking up prejudice, children mix it with ignorance which, as I’ve said, should be distinguished from prejudice. A child, as he begins to study the world around him, tries to organise his experiences. Doing this, he begins to classify things and people and begins to form connections—or what psychologists call associations. He needs to do this because he saves time and effort by putting things and people into categories. But unless he classifies correctly, his categories will mislead rather than guide him. For example, if a child learns that “all fires are hot and dangerous,” fires have been put firmly into the category of things to be watched carefully—and thus he can save himself from harm. But if he learns a category like “Negroes are lazy” or “foreigners are fools,” he‘s learned generalisations that mislead because they’re unreliable. The thing is that, when we use categories, we need to remember the exceptions and differences, the individual variations that qualify the usefulness of all generalisations. Some fires, for example, are hotter and more dangerous than others. If people had avoided all fires as dangerous, we would never have had central heating. More importantly, we can ill afford to treat people of any given group as generally alike, even when it’s possible to make some accurate generalisations about them. So when a child first begins to group things together, it’s advisable that he learns differences as well as similarities. For example, basic among the distinctions he draws is the division into “good” and “bad”, which he makes largely on the grounds of what his parents do and say about things and the people. Thus, he may learn that dirt is “bad” because his mother washes him every time he gets dirty. By extension, seeing a Negro child, he might point to him and say, “Bad child”, for the Negro child’s face is brown, hence, unwashed and dirty, and so, “bad” We call this prelogical thing, and all of us go through this phase before we learn to think more effectively. But some people remain at this stage and never learn that things seem alike, such as dirt and brown pigmen are really quite different. Whether a child graduates from his stage to correct thinking or to prejudicial thinking, depends to a great extent on his experiences with his parents and teachers. Careful categorization and generalization is required for picking prejudice, else it can be misleading. Which among the following option justifies this statement? A Avoiding fire is always good. B Fire can be used for several important purposes also. C Since fire is hot and dangerous, so it cannot be put to use. D None of the above
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Peace and order are necessary, not just in our own country but also at the international level, if we are to secure national progress and development. The different countries in the world are coming closer today due to faster means of transport and communications. Economically, they are becoming increasingly interdependent, if peace is disturbed in one part of the world. It has adverse effects in other parts of the world as well. Nuclear weapons have already threatened the world with nuclear war. If the conflicts between different nations are not settled in time, they might culminate in a nuclear war destroying the whole world. It is therefore in our own interest that the world is free of conflicts. If at all there are only, they must be seated promptly and peace should be restored. That is why we have declared the establishment of international peace and understanding as an objective of our foreign policy. We need the help and co-operation of other countries for our scientific, industrial and economic development, especially in those fields where we have yet to achieve self-sufficiency. We obtain the latest machinery, technology and financial aid from the developed countries. On our part, we, too, offer help to the underdevelopedcountries. We are keen on maintaining friendly relations with other countries. Such friendly relations foster international understanding. We have always exerted ourselves to see that the disputes arising between the different nations are settled through peaceful negotiations. We play an active role in the United Nations, the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation, the Commonwealth of Nations and other such international organisations. We make it a point to participate in the international conferences on issues like energy crisis, environmental imbalance, nuclear arms race, etc. We always offer a helping hand to other nations affected by natural calamities such as famines, earthquakes, floods and so on. We strive to maintain peaceful and friendly relations with our neighbouring countries. Why do we do all this? We sincerely believe that the conflicts in today’s world should be minimised, making way for better cooperation among the nations. If this is achieved, human resources will no longer be wasted in things like war or aggression. There will be no destruction of wealth. We believe that, in a peaceful world, there will be greater scope for the economic and cultural development of the countries. What is the main idea expressed in this passage? A Peace is necessary to overall development of our country B Threat of nuclear war C Economic interdependence of the nations D Peace will lead to cultural development of nations
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Peace and order are necessary, not just in our own country but also at the international level, if we are to secure national progress and development. The different countries in the world are coming closer today due to faster means of transport and communications. Economically, they are becoming increasingly interdependent, if peace is disturbed in one part of the world. It has adverse effects in other parts of the world as well. Nuclear weapons have already threatened the world with nuclear war. If the conflicts between different nations are not settled in time, they might culminate in a nuclear war destroying the whole world. It is therefore in our own interest that the world is free of conflicts. If at all there are only, they must be seated promptly and peace should be restored. That is why we have declared the establishment of international peace and understanding as an objective of our foreign policy. We need the help and co-operation of other countries for our scientific, industrial and economic development, especially in those fields where we have yet to achieve self-sufficiency. We obtain the latest machinery, technology and financial aid from the developed countries. On our part, we, too, offer help to the underdevelopedcountries. We are keen on maintaining friendly relations with other countries. Such friendly relations foster international understanding. We have always exerted ourselves to see that the disputes arising between the different nations are settled through peaceful negotiations. We play an active role in the United Nations, the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation, the Commonwealth of Nations and other such international organisations. We make it a point to participate in the international conferences on issues like energy crisis, environmental imbalance, nuclear arms race, etc. We always offer a helping hand to other nations affected by natural calamities such as famines, earthquakes, floods and so on. We strive to maintain peaceful and friendly relations with our neighbouring countries. Why do we do all this? We sincerely believe that the conflicts in today’s world should be minimised, making way for better cooperation among the nations. If this is achieved, human resources will no longer be wasted in things like war or aggression. There will be no destruction of wealth. We believe that, in a peaceful world, there will be greater scope for the economic and cultural development of the countries. The question, “why do we do all this?” is asked in the passage in which of the following context? A We offer a helping hand to other nations in improving their technology B We obtain technology and financial aid from the developed countries C We endeavour to maintain peaceful and friendly relations with our neighbours D We have shaped our foreign policy in balanced and purposeful manner
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Peace and order are necessary, not just in our own country but also at the international level, if we are to secure national progress and development. The different countries in the world are coming closer today due to faster means of transport and communications. Economically, they are becoming increasingly interdependent, if peace is disturbed in one part of the world. It has adverse effects in other parts of the world as well. Nuclear weapons have already threatened the world with nuclear war. If the conflicts between different nations are not settled in time, they might culminate in a nuclear war destroying the whole world. It is therefore in our own interest that the world is free of conflicts. If at all there are only, they must be seated promptly and peace should be restored. That is why we have declared the establishment of international peace and understanding as an objective of our foreign policy. We need the help and co-operation of other countries for our scientific, industrial and economic development, especially in those fields where we have yet to achieve self-sufficiency. We obtain the latest machinery, technology and financial aid from the developed countries. On our part, we, too, offer help to the underdevelopedcountries. We are keen on maintaining friendly relations with other countries. Such friendly relations foster international understanding. We have always exerted ourselves to see that the disputes arising between the different nations are settled through peaceful negotiations. We play an active role in the United Nations, the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation, the Commonwealth of Nations and other such international organisations. We make it a point to participate in the international conferences on issues like energy crisis, environmental imbalance, nuclear arms race, etc. We always offer a helping hand to other nations affected by natural calamities such as famines, earthquakes, floods and so on. We strive to maintain peaceful and friendly relations with our neighbouring countries. Why do we do all this? We sincerely believe that the conflicts in today’s world should be minimised, making way for better cooperation among the nations. If this is achieved, human resources will no longer be wasted in things like war or aggression. There will be no destruction of wealth. We believe that, in a peaceful world, there will be greater scope for the economic and cultural development of the countries. Which of the following statements is not true? A Owing to the economic interdependence between countries, it is necessary to keep the world conflict free. B Friendly relations with the underdeveloped countries won’t foster good international relations much. C Peace ensures growth in all fields. D Maintaining peace with other countries would ensure overall growth of the country.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Peace and order are necessary, not just in our own country but also at the international level, if we are to secure national progress and development. The different countries in the world are coming closer today due to faster means of transport and communications. Economically, they are becoming increasingly interdependent, if peace is disturbed in one part of the world. It has adverse effects in other parts of the world as well. Nuclear weapons have already threatened the world with nuclear war. If the conflicts between different nations are not settled in time, they might culminate in a nuclear war destroying the whole world. It is therefore in our own interest that the world is free of conflicts. If at all there are only, they must be seated promptly and peace should be restored. That is why we have declared the establishment of international peace and understanding as an objective of our foreign policy. We need the help and co-operation of other countries for our scientific, industrial and economic development, especially in those fields where we have yet to achieve self-sufficiency. We obtain the latest machinery, technology and financial aid from the developed countries. On our part, we, too, offer help to the underdevelopedcountries. We are keen on maintaining friendly relations with other countries. Such friendly relations foster international understanding. We have always exerted ourselves to see that the disputes arising between the different nations are settled through peaceful negotiations. We play an active role in the United Nations, the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation, the Commonwealth of Nations and other such international organisations. We make it a point to participate in the international conferences on issues like energy crisis, environmental imbalance, nuclear arms race, etc. We always offer a helping hand to other nations affected by natural calamities such as famines, earthquakes, floods and so on. We strive to maintain peaceful and friendly relations with our neighbouring countries. Why do we do all this? We sincerely believe that the conflicts in today’s world should be minimised, making way for better cooperation among the nations. If this is achieved, human resources will no longer be wasted in things like war or aggression. There will be no destruction of wealth. We believe that, in a peaceful world, there will be greater scope for the economic and cultural development of the countries. If the conflicts between different countries are not resolved, how would it affect the prosperity globally? A Disturbing peace in one part of the world won’t have much effect on the other areas. B Only underdeveloped nations would be at the receiving end. C Economic and cultural development would be hampered across all nations. D As such, there will not be any destruction of wealth.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   In personal relations veracity is, if not the universal practice, at any rate an accepted rule of conduct: we are shocked if others break it, ashamed if we do so ourselves. But in controversy on social and political problems our standards are very different; there are politicians and publicists who take licence in this field which they would never allow themselves in personal relations, though if we must depart from the truth, it is less disastrous to do so in private than in public life. For – apart from any moral question – inveracity in political – and social controversy is such an obstacle to progress; it prevents our ascertaining the facts; hinders common action. A man does not help the country to find the right road by throwing dust in people’s eyes; and in process some dust is apt to find its way into his own. It is hard enough to find the truth and know it; it is not made easier if a large number of people are trying to conceal it. There are many obstacles to political and social progress; but the chief one is what I have called inveracity. We hear a good deal today about the need of improving the physical health of the nation. Let us, to this admirable campaign, add one for improving the health of its intelligence, and see what can do to extirpate a major disease of it and so acquire healthy minds. The author tackles the problem in: A argumentative manner B analytical manner C emotional manner D expository manner
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   In personal relations veracity is, if not the universal practice, at any rate an accepted rule of conduct: we are shocked if others break it, ashamed if we do so ourselves. But in controversy on social and political problems our standards are very different; there are politicians and publicists who take licence in this field which they would never allow themselves in personal relations, though if we must depart from the truth, it is less disastrous to do so in private than in public life. For – apart from any moral question – inveracity in political – and social controversy is such an obstacle to progress; it prevents our ascertaining the facts; hinders common action. A man does not help the country to find the right road by throwing dust in people’s eyes; and in process some dust is apt to find its way into his own. It is hard enough to find the truth and know it; it is not made easier if a large number of people are trying to conceal it. There are many obstacles to political and social progress; but the chief one is what I have called inveracity. We hear a good deal today about the need of improving the physical health of the nation. Let us, to this admirable campaign, add one for improving the health of its intelligence, and see what can do to extirpate a major disease of it and so acquire healthy minds. The writer does not say: A Those who cheat the people are some times themselves cheated B Progress – Social and political – is hindered by many factors C We do not violate veracity in both personal and public affairs D None of these
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   In personal relations veracity is, if not the universal practice, at any rate an accepted rule of conduct: we are shocked if others break it, ashamed if we do so ourselves. But in controversy on social and political problems our standards are very different; there are politicians and publicists who take licence in this field which they would never allow themselves in personal relations, though if we must depart from the truth, it is less disastrous to do so in private than in public life. For – apart from any moral question – inveracity in political – and social controversy is such an obstacle to progress; it prevents our ascertaining the facts; hinders common action. A man does not help the country to find the right road by throwing dust in people’s eyes; and in process some dust is apt to find its way into his own. It is hard enough to find the truth and know it; it is not made easier if a large number of people are trying to conceal it. There are many obstacles to political and social progress; but the chief one is what I have called inveracity. We hear a good deal today about the need of improving the physical health of the nation. Let us, to this admirable campaign, add one for improving the health of its intelligence, and see what can do to extirpate a major disease of it and so acquire healthy minds. We can infer from the passage: A We need the same qualities for personal, social and political life B Inveracity hinders common action C Man loves truth D Man does not do to others what he wants to be done to himself
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Biosphere Reserves are areas of terrestrial and coastal ecosystems which are internationally recognised within the framework of UNESCO’s Man and Biosphere (MAB) Programme. These reserves are required to meet a minimal set of criteria and adhere to a minimal set of conditions before being admitted to the World Network of Biosphere Reserve designated by UNESCO. The world’s major ecosystem types and landscapes are represented in this network. The goal is to facilitate conservation of representative landscapes and their immense biological diversity and cultural heritage, foster economic and human development which is culturally and ecologically sustainable and to provide support for research, monitoring, education and information exchange. So far, fourteen Biosphere Reserves have been set-up. They are: Nilgiri, Nanda Devi, Nokrek, Great Nicobar, Gulf of Mannar, Manas, Sunderbans, Similipal, Dibru Daikhowa, Dehang Debang, Panchmarhi, Kanchanjanga, Agasthyamalii, and Achanakmar-Amarkantak. Out of fourteen Biosphere Reserves, four have been recognized on World Network of Biosphere Reserves by UNESCO, namely, Sunderbans (West Bengal), Gulf of Mannar (Tamil Nadu), Nilgiri (Tamil Nadu, Kerala and Karnataka) and Nanda Devi. Biosphere Reserves are areas of A desert region. B gulf regian. C terrestrials and coastal ecosystems. D lunar and coastal ecosystems.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The atmosphere is a mixture of several gases. There are about ten chemical elements, which remain permanently in gaseous state, form the atmosphere under all natural conditions. Of these permanent gases, oxygen makes up about 21 per cent and nitrogen about 78 per cent. Several other gases, such as argon, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, neon, krypton and xenon, comprise the remaining one per cent of the volume of dry air. The amount of water vapours, and its variations in amount and distribution are of extraordinary importance in weather changes. Atmospheric gases hold in suspension great quantities of dust, pollen, smoke and other impurities which are always present in considerable, but variable amounts. The atmosphere has no definite upper limits but gradually thins until it becomes imperceptible. Until recently it was assumed that the air above the first few miles gradually grew thinner and colder at a constant rate. It was also assumed that upper air had little influence on weather changes. Recent studies of the upper atmosphere, currently being conducted by earth satellites and missile probing, have shown these assumptions to be incorrect. The atmosphere has three well-defined strata. The layer of the air next to the earth, which extends upward for about 10 miles, is known as the troposphere. On the whole, it makes up about 75 per cent of all the weight of the atmosphere. It is the warmest part of the atmosphere because most of the solar radiation is absorbed by the earth’s surface, which warms the air immediately surrounding it. A steady decrease of temperature with increasing elevation is a most striking characteristic. The upper layers are colder because of their greater distance from the earth’s surface and rapid radiation of heat into space. The temperatures within the troposphere decrease about 3.5 degrees per 1000 feet increase in altitude. Within the troposphere, winds and air currents distribute heat and moisture. Strong winds, called jet streams, are located at the upper levels of the troposphere. These jet streams are both complex and widespread in occurrence. They normally show a wave-shaped pattern and move from west to east at velocities of 150 mph, but velocities as high as 400 mph have been noted. The influences of changing locations and strengths of jet streams upon weather conditions and patterns are no doubt considerable. Current intensive research may eventually reveal their true significance. Above the troposphere to a height of about 50 miles is a zone called the stratosphere. The stratosphere is separated from the troposphere by a zone of uniform temperatures called the tropopause. Within the lower portions of the stratosphere is a layer of ozone gases which filters out most of the ultraviolet rays from the sun. The ozone layer varies with air pressure. If this zone were not there, the full blast of the sun’s ultraviolet light would burn our skins, blind our eyes, and eventually result in our destruction. Within the stratosphere, the temperature and atmospheric compositions are relatively uniform. The layer upward of about 50 miles is the most fascinating but the least known of these three strata, it is called the ionosphere because it consists of electrically-charged particles called ions, thrown from the sun. The northern lights (aurora borealis) originate within this highly-chained portion of the atmosphere. Its effect upon weather conditions, if any is as yet unknown. According to the passage, life, as we know, exists on the earth because the atmosphere A Contains electrically-charged particles B Is warmest at the bottom C Carries ultraviolet rays D Contains a layer of ozone gases
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The atmosphere is a mixture of several gases. There are about ten chemical elements, which remain permanently in gaseous state, form the atmosphere under all natural conditions. Of these permanent gases, oxygen makes up about 21 per cent and nitrogen about 78 per cent. Several other gases, such as argon, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, neon, krypton and xenon, comprise the remaining one per cent of the volume of dry air. The amount of water vapours, and its variations in amount and distribution are of extraordinary importance in weather changes. Atmospheric gases hold in suspension great quantities of dust, pollen, smoke and other impurities which are always present in considerable, but variable amounts. The atmosphere has no definite upper limits but gradually thins until it becomes imperceptible. Until recently it was assumed that the air above the first few miles gradually grew thinner and colder at a constant rate. It was also assumed that upper air had little influence on weather changes. Recent studies of the upper atmosphere, currently being conducted by earth satellites and missile probing, have shown these assumptions to be incorrect. The atmosphere has three well-defined strata. The layer of the air next to the earth, which extends upward for about 10 miles, is known as the troposphere. On the whole, it makes up about 75 per cent of all the weight of the atmosphere. It is the warmest part of the atmosphere because most of the solar radiation is absorbed by the earth’s surface, which warms the air immediately surrounding it. A steady decrease of temperature with increasing elevation is a most striking characteristic. The upper layers are colder because of their greater distance from the earth’s surface and rapid radiation of heat into space. The temperatures within the troposphere decrease about 3.5 degrees per 1000 feet increase in altitude. Within the troposphere, winds and air currents distribute heat and moisture. Strong winds, called jet streams, are located at the upper levels of the troposphere. These jet streams are both complex and widespread in occurrence. They normally show a wave-shaped pattern and move from west to east at velocities of 150 mph, but velocities as high as 400 mph have been noted. The influences of changing locations and strengths of jet streams upon weather conditions and patterns are no doubt considerable. Current intensive research may eventually reveal their true significance. Above the troposphere to a height of about 50 miles is a zone called the stratosphere. The stratosphere is separated from the troposphere by a zone of uniform temperatures called the tropopause. Within the lower portions of the stratosphere is a layer of ozone gases which filters out most of the ultraviolet rays from the sun. The ozone layer varies with air pressure. If this zone were not there, the full blast of the sun’s ultraviolet light would burn our skins, blind our eyes, and eventually result in our destruction. Within the stratosphere, the temperature and atmospheric compositions are relatively uniform. The layer upward of about 50 miles is the most fascinating but the least known of these three strata, it is called the ionosphere because it consists of electrically-charged particles called ions, thrown from the sun. The northern lights (aurora borealis) originate within this highly-chained portion of the atmosphere. Its effect upon weather conditions, if any is as yet unknown. The passage supplies information that would answer which of the following questions? (A) How do the troposphere and stratosphere differ? (B) How does ionoshere affect and weather? (C) How do earth satellites study the atmosphere A (A) only B (C) only C (A), (B) and (C) D (A) and (C) only
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The atmosphere is a mixture of several gases. There are about ten chemical elements, which remain permanently in gaseous state, form the atmosphere under all natural conditions. Of these permanent gases, oxygen makes up about 21 per cent and nitrogen about 78 per cent. Several other gases, such as argon, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, neon, krypton and xenon, comprise the remaining one per cent of the volume of dry air. The amount of water vapours, and its variations in amount and distribution are of extraordinary importance in weather changes. Atmospheric gases hold in suspension great quantities of dust, pollen, smoke and other impurities which are always present in considerable, but variable amounts. The atmosphere has no definite upper limits but gradually thins until it becomes imperceptible. Until recently it was assumed that the air above the first few miles gradually grew thinner and colder at a constant rate. It was also assumed that upper air had little influence on weather changes. Recent studies of the upper atmosphere, currently being conducted by earth satellites and missile probing, have shown these assumptions to be incorrect. The atmosphere has three well-defined strata. The layer of the air next to the earth, which extends upward for about 10 miles, is known as the troposphere. On the whole, it makes up about 75 per cent of all the weight of the atmosphere. It is the warmest part of the atmosphere because most of the solar radiation is absorbed by the earth’s surface, which warms the air immediately surrounding it. A steady decrease of temperature with increasing elevation is a most striking characteristic. The upper layers are colder because of their greater distance from the earth’s surface and rapid radiation of heat into space. The temperatures within the troposphere decrease about 3.5 degrees per 1000 feet increase in altitude. Within the troposphere, winds and air currents distribute heat and moisture. Strong winds, called jet streams, are located at the upper levels of the troposphere. These jet streams are both complex and widespread in occurrence. They normally show a wave-shaped pattern and move from west to east at velocities of 150 mph, but velocities as high as 400 mph have been noted. The influences of changing locations and strengths of jet streams upon weather conditions and patterns are no doubt considerable. Current intensive research may eventually reveal their true significance. Above the troposphere to a height of about 50 miles is a zone called the stratosphere. The stratosphere is separated from the troposphere by a zone of uniform temperatures called the tropopause. Within the lower portions of the stratosphere is a layer of ozone gases which filters out most of the ultraviolet rays from the sun. The ozone layer varies with air pressure. If this zone were not there, the full blast of the sun’s ultraviolet light would burn our skins, blind our eyes, and eventually result in our destruction. Within the stratosphere, the temperature and atmospheric compositions are relatively uniform. The layer upward of about 50 miles is the most fascinating but the least known of these three strata, it is called the ionosphere because it consists of electrically-charged particles called ions, thrown from the sun. The northern lights (aurora borealis) originate within this highly-chained portion of the atmosphere. Its effect upon weather conditions, if any is as yet unknown. The passage states that troposphere is the warmest part of the atmosphere because it A Is closest to the sun B Contains electrically-charged particles C Is warmed by the earth’s heat D Has winds and air currents that distribute the heat
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The atmosphere is a mixture of several gases. There are about ten chemical elements, which remain permanently in gaseous state, form the atmosphere under all natural conditions. Of these permanent gases, oxygen makes up about 21 per cent and nitrogen about 78 per cent. Several other gases, such as argon, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, neon, krypton and xenon, comprise the remaining one per cent of the volume of dry air. The amount of water vapours, and its variations in amount and distribution are of extraordinary importance in weather changes. Atmospheric gases hold in suspension great quantities of dust, pollen, smoke and other impurities which are always present in considerable, but variable amounts. The atmosphere has no definite upper limits but gradually thins until it becomes imperceptible. Until recently it was assumed that the air above the first few miles gradually grew thinner and colder at a constant rate. It was also assumed that upper air had little influence on weather changes. Recent studies of the upper atmosphere, currently being conducted by earth satellites and missile probing, have shown these assumptions to be incorrect. The atmosphere has three well-defined strata. The layer of the air next to the earth, which extends upward for about 10 miles, is known as the troposphere. On the whole, it makes up about 75 per cent of all the weight of the atmosphere. It is the warmest part of the atmosphere because most of the solar radiation is absorbed by the earth’s surface, which warms the air immediately surrounding it. A steady decrease of temperature with increasing elevation is a most striking characteristic. The upper layers are colder because of their greater distance from the earth’s surface and rapid radiation of heat into space. The temperatures within the troposphere decrease about 3.5 degrees per 1000 feet increase in altitude. Within the troposphere, winds and air currents distribute heat and moisture. Strong winds, called jet streams, are located at the upper levels of the troposphere. These jet streams are both complex and widespread in occurrence. They normally show a wave-shaped pattern and move from west to east at velocities of 150 mph, but velocities as high as 400 mph have been noted. The influences of changing locations and strengths of jet streams upon weather conditions and patterns are no doubt considerable. Current intensive research may eventually reveal their true significance. Above the troposphere to a height of about 50 miles is a zone called the stratosphere. The stratosphere is separated from the troposphere by a zone of uniform temperatures called the tropopause. Within the lower portions of the stratosphere is a layer of ozone gases which filters out most of the ultraviolet rays from the sun. The ozone layer varies with air pressure. If this zone were not there, the full blast of the sun’s ultraviolet light would burn our skins, blind our eyes, and eventually result in our destruction. Within the stratosphere, the temperature and atmospheric compositions are relatively uniform. The layer upward of about 50 miles is the most fascinating but the least known of these three strata, it is called the ionosphere because it consists of electrically-charged particles called ions, thrown from the sun. The northern lights (aurora borealis) originate within this highly-chained portion of the atmosphere. Its effect upon weather conditions, if any is as yet unknown. According to the passage, which of the following assumptions is/are incorrect. A upper air has little influence on weather changes. B the atmosphere has definite upper limits. C both (A) and (B) D none of these
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Recent technological advances in manned and unmanned undersea vehicles, along with breakthroughs in satellite technology and computer equipment, have overcome some of the limitations of divers and diving equipments for scientists doing research on the great oceans of the world. Without a vehicle, divers often became sluggish, and their mental concentration was severely limited. Because undersea pressure affects their speech organs, communication among divers has always been difficult or impossible. But today, most oceanographers avoid the use of vulnerable human divers, preferring to reduce the risk to human life and make direct observations by means of instruments that are lowered into the ocean, from samples taken from the water, or from photographs made by orbiting satellites. Direct observations of the ocean floor can be made not only by divers but also by deepdiving submarines in the water and even by the technology of sophisticated aerial photography from vantage points above the surface of the water. Some submarines can dive to depths of more than seven miles and cruise at depths of fifteen thousand feet. In addition, radio-equipped buoys can be operated by remote control in order to transmit information back to land-based laboratories via satellite. Particularly important for ocean study are data about water temperature, currents, and weather. Satellite photographs can show the distribution of sea ice, of slicks, and cloud formations over the ocean. Maps created from satellite pictures can represent the temperature and the colour of the ocean’s surface, enabling researchers to study the ocean currents from laboratories on dry land. Furthermore, computers help oceanographers to collect, organize, and analyze data from submarines and satellites. By creating a model of the ocean’s movement and characteristics, scientists can predict the patterns and possible effects of the ocean on the environment. Recently, many oceanographers have been relying more on satellites and computers than on research ships or even submarine vehicles because they can supply a greater range of information more quickly and more effectively. Some of humankind’s most serious problems, especially those concerning energy and food, may be solved with the help of observations made possible by this new technology. How is a radio-equipped buoy operated? A By operators inside the vehicle in the part underwater B By operators outside the vehicle on a ship C By operators outside the vehicle on a diving platform D By operators outside the vehicle in a laboratory on shore
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Recent technological advances in manned and unmanned undersea vehicles, along with breakthroughs in satellite technology and computer equipment, have overcome some of the limitations of divers and diving equipments for scientists doing research on the great oceans of the world. Without a vehicle, divers often became sluggish, and their mental concentration was severely limited. Because undersea pressure affects their speech organs, communication among divers has always been difficult or impossible. But today, most oceanographers avoid the use of vulnerable human divers, preferring to reduce the risk to human life and make direct observations by means of instruments that are lowered into the ocean, from samples taken from the water, or from photographs made by orbiting satellites. Direct observations of the ocean floor can be made not only by divers but also by deepdiving submarines in the water and even by the technology of sophisticated aerial photography from vantage points above the surface of the water. Some submarines can dive to depths of more than seven miles and cruise at depths of fifteen thousand feet. In addition, radio-equipped buoys can be operated by remote control in order to transmit information back to land-based laboratories via satellite. Particularly important for ocean study are data about water temperature, currents, and weather. Satellite photographs can show the distribution of sea ice, of slicks, and cloud formations over the ocean. Maps created from satellite pictures can represent the temperature and the colour of the ocean’s surface, enabling researchers to study the ocean currents from laboratories on dry land. Furthermore, computers help oceanographers to collect, organize, and analyze data from submarines and satellites. By creating a model of the ocean’s movement and characteristics, scientists can predict the patterns and possible effects of the ocean on the environment. Recently, many oceanographers have been relying more on satellites and computers than on research ships or even submarine vehicles because they can supply a greater range of information more quickly and more effectively. Some of humankind’s most serious problems, especially those concerning energy and food, may be solved with the help of observations made possible by this new technology. The word cruise in the given paragraph could best be replaced by A Travel at a constant speed B Function without problems C Stay in communication D Remain still
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Recent technological advances in manned and unmanned undersea vehicles, along with breakthroughs in satellite technology and computer equipment, have overcome some of the limitations of divers and diving equipments for scientists doing research on the great oceans of the world. Without a vehicle, divers often became sluggish, and their mental concentration was severely limited. Because undersea pressure affects their speech organs, communication among divers has always been difficult or impossible. But today, most oceanographers avoid the use of vulnerable human divers, preferring to reduce the risk to human life and make direct observations by means of instruments that are lowered into the ocean, from samples taken from the water, or from photographs made by orbiting satellites. Direct observations of the ocean floor can be made not only by divers but also by deepdiving submarines in the water and even by the technology of sophisticated aerial photography from vantage points above the surface of the water. Some submarines can dive to depths of more than seven miles and cruise at depths of fifteen thousand feet. In addition, radio-equipped buoys can be operated by remote control in order to transmit information back to land-based laboratories via satellite. Particularly important for ocean study are data about water temperature, currents, and weather. Satellite photographs can show the distribution of sea ice, of slicks, and cloud formations over the ocean. Maps created from satellite pictures can represent the temperature and the colour of the ocean’s surface, enabling researchers to study the ocean currents from laboratories on dry land. Furthermore, computers help oceanographers to collect, organize, and analyze data from submarines and satellites. By creating a model of the ocean’s movement and characteristics, scientists can predict the patterns and possible effects of the ocean on the environment. Recently, many oceanographers have been relying more on satellites and computers than on research ships or even submarine vehicles because they can supply a greater range of information more quickly and more effectively. Some of humankind’s most serious problems, especially those concerning energy and food, may be solved with the help of observations made possible by this new technology. Which of the following is NOT shown in satellite photograph? A The temperature of the ocean’s surface B Cloud formations over the ocean C A model of the ocean’s movements D The location of sea ice
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Recent technological advances in manned and unmanned undersea vehicles, along with breakthroughs in satellite technology and computer equipment, have overcome some of the limitations of divers and diving equipments for scientists doing research on the great oceans of the world. Without a vehicle, divers often became sluggish, and their mental concentration was severely limited. Because undersea pressure affects their speech organs, communication among divers has always been difficult or impossible. But today, most oceanographers avoid the use of vulnerable human divers, preferring to reduce the risk to human life and make direct observations by means of instruments that are lowered into the ocean, from samples taken from the water, or from photographs made by orbiting satellites. Direct observations of the ocean floor can be made not only by divers but also by deepdiving submarines in the water and even by the technology of sophisticated aerial photography from vantage points above the surface of the water. Some submarines can dive to depths of more than seven miles and cruise at depths of fifteen thousand feet. In addition, radio-equipped buoys can be operated by remote control in order to transmit information back to land-based laboratories via satellite. Particularly important for ocean study are data about water temperature, currents, and weather. Satellite photographs can show the distribution of sea ice, of slicks, and cloud formations over the ocean. Maps created from satellite pictures can represent the temperature and the colour of the ocean’s surface, enabling researchers to study the ocean currents from laboratories on dry land. Furthermore, computers help oceanographers to collect, organize, and analyze data from submarines and satellites. By creating a model of the ocean’s movement and characteristics, scientists can predict the patterns and possible effects of the ocean on the environment. Recently, many oceanographers have been relying more on satellites and computers than on research ships or even submarine vehicles because they can supply a greater range of information more quickly and more effectively. Some of humankind’s most serious problems, especially those concerning energy and food, may be solved with the help of observations made possible by this new technology. Undersea vehicles A Are too small for a man to fit inside B Are very slow to respond C Have the same limitations that divers have D Make direct observations of the ocean floor
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The chief condition of happiness, barring certain physical prerequisistes, is the life of reason—the specific garry and power of man. Virtue, or rather excellence, will depend on clear judgement, self-control, symmetry of desire, artistry of means; it is not thepossession of the simple man, nor the gift of innocent intent, but the achievement of experience in the fully developed man. Yet there is a rod to it, a guide to excellence, which may save many detours and delays: it is the middle way the golden mean. The qualities of character can be arranged in triads in each of which the first and the last qualities will be extremes and vices, and the middle quality a virtue or an excellence. So between cowardice and rashness is courage: between stinginess and extravagance is liberality; between sloth and greed is ambition; between humility and pride is modesty; between secrecy and loquacity is honesty; between moroseness and buffoonery is good humour; between quarrelsomeness and flattery is friendship; between Hamlets’ indecisiveness and Quixote’s impulsiveness is self-control ‘Right’, in ethics or conduct is not different from right in mathematics or engineering; it means correct and fit what works best to the best results. What is the implied meaning of the passage? A happiness depends upon physical and mental qualities B self-control is necessary C excellence should be achieved D rational approach lies in following the middle path
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The chief condition of happiness, barring certain physical prerequisistes, is the life of reason—the specific garry and power of man. Virtue, or rather excellence, will depend on clear judgement, self-control, symmetry of desire, artistry of means; it is not thepossession of the simple man, nor the gift of innocent intent, but the achievement of experience in the fully developed man. Yet there is a rod to it, a guide to excellence, which may save many detours and delays: it is the middle way the golden mean. The qualities of character can be arranged in triads in each of which the first and the last qualities will be extremes and vices, and the middle quality a virtue or an excellence. So between cowardice and rashness is courage: between stinginess and extravagance is liberality; between sloth and greed is ambition; between humility and pride is modesty; between secrecy and loquacity is honesty; between moroseness and buffoonery is good humour; between quarrelsomeness and flattery is friendship; between Hamlets’ indecisiveness and Quixote’s impulsiveness is self-control ‘Right’, in ethics or conduct is not different from right in mathematics or engineering; it means correct and fit what works best to the best results. The author has not said: A the middle path between humility and pride is modesty B middle path avoids delay in achieving excellence; right in ethics means that works to the best results C courage is the middle path of indecisiveness and impulsiveness D none of these
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The chief condition of happiness, barring certain physical prerequisistes, is the life of reason—the specific garry and power of man. Virtue, or rather excellence, will depend on clear judgement, self-control, symmetry of desire, artistry of means; it is not thepossession of the simple man, nor the gift of innocent intent, but the achievement of experience in the fully developed man. Yet there is a rod to it, a guide to excellence, which may save many detours and delays: it is the middle way the golden mean. The qualities of character can be arranged in triads in each of which the first and the last qualities will be extremes and vices, and the middle quality a virtue or an excellence. So between cowardice and rashness is courage: between stinginess and extravagance is liberality; between sloth and greed is ambition; between humility and pride is modesty; between secrecy and loquacity is honesty; between moroseness and buffoonery is good humour; between quarrelsomeness and flattery is friendship; between Hamlets’ indecisiveness and Quixote’s impulsiveness is self-control ‘Right’, in ethics or conduct is not different from right in mathematics or engineering; it means correct and fit what works best to the best results. Who of the following is not the writer of either Hamlet or Don Quixote? A Ben Jonson B Shakespeare C Cervantes D None of these
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Some religious teachers have taught that Man is made up of a body and a soul: but they have been silent about the intellect. Their followers try to feed the body on earth and to save soul from perdition after death but they neglected the claims of the mind. Bread for the body and virtue for the soul these are regarded as the indispensable requisites of human welfare here and hereafter. Nothing is said about knowledge and education. Thus Jesus Christ spoke much of feeding the hungry, healing the sick, and converting the sinners: but he never taught the duty of teaching the ignorant and increasing scientific knowledge. He himself was not a well educated man, an intellectual pursuits were beyond his horizon. Gautam Buddha also laid stress on morality, meditation and as criticism, but he did not attach great importance to history, science, art and literature. St. Ambrose depreciated scientific studies and wrote, “To discuss the nature and position of the earth does not help us in our hope for life to come”. St. Basil said very frankly and follishly. “It is not a matter of interest for us whether the earth is a sphere or a cylinder or disc”. Thomas Carlyle also followed the Christian tradition when he declared that he honoured only two men and no third. That the manual labour and the religious teacher. He forgot the scientist, the scholar and the artist the cynics of Greece despised education at last? What have the religious teachers taught in the past? A That man is made up of body only B That man is made up of body and soul together C That man is made up of soul only D That man is made up of bubbles
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Some religious teachers have taught that Man is made up of a body and a soul: but they have been silent about the intellect. Their followers try to feed the body on earth and to save soul from perdition after death but they neglected the claims of the mind. Bread for the body and virtue for the soul these are regarded as the indispensable requisites of human welfare here and hereafter. Nothing is said about knowledge and education. Thus Jesus Christ spoke much of feeding the hungry, healing the sick, and converting the sinners: but he never taught the duty of teaching the ignorant and increasing scientific knowledge. He himself was not a well educated man, an intellectual pursuits were beyond his horizon. Gautam Buddha also laid stress on morality, meditation and as criticism, but he did not attach great importance to history, science, art and literature. St. Ambrose depreciated scientific studies and wrote, “To discuss the nature and position of the earth does not help us in our hope for life to come”. St. Basil said very frankly and follishly. “It is not a matter of interest for us whether the earth is a sphere or a cylinder or disc”. Thomas Carlyle also followed the Christian tradition when he declared that he honoured only two men and no third. That the manual labour and the religious teacher. He forgot the scientist, the scholar and the artist the cynics of Greece despised education at last? What is food for the soul? A virtue B education C vice D bread
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Some religious teachers have taught that Man is made up of a body and a soul: but they have been silent about the intellect. Their followers try to feed the body on earth and to save soul from perdition after death but they neglected the claims of the mind. Bread for the body and virtue for the soul these are regarded as the indispensable requisites of human welfare here and hereafter. Nothing is said about knowledge and education. Thus Jesus Christ spoke much of feeding the hungry, healing the sick, and converting the sinners: but he never taught the duty of teaching the ignorant and increasing scientific knowledge. He himself was not a well educated man, an intellectual pursuits were beyond his horizon. Gautam Buddha also laid stress on morality, meditation and as criticism, but he did not attach great importance to history, science, art and literature. St. Ambrose depreciated scientific studies and wrote, “To discuss the nature and position of the earth does not help us in our hope for life to come”. St. Basil said very frankly and follishly. “It is not a matter of interest for us whether the earth is a sphere or a cylinder or disc”. Thomas Carlyle also followed the Christian tradition when he declared that he honoured only two men and no third. That the manual labour and the religious teacher. He forgot the scientist, the scholar and the artist the cynics of Greece despised education at last? The following Philosophers occur in the passage. But they are not in correct order. Correct the order (i) Jesus Christ (ii) Gautam Buddha (iii) St. Ambrose (iv) Thomas Carlyle (v) St. Basil A I, ii, iii, iv, v B i, iii, iv, v, ii C i, ii, iii, v, iv D ii, i, iii, iv, v
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Some religious teachers have taught that Man is made up of a body and a soul: but they have been silent about the intellect. Their followers try to feed the body on earth and to save soul from perdition after death but they neglected the claims of the mind. Bread for the body and virtue for the soul these are regarded as the indispensable requisites of human welfare here and hereafter. Nothing is said about knowledge and education. Thus Jesus Christ spoke much of feeding the hungry, healing the sick, and converting the sinners: but he never taught the duty of teaching the ignorant and increasing scientific knowledge. He himself was not a well educated man, an intellectual pursuits were beyond his horizon. Gautam Buddha also laid stress on morality, meditation and as criticism, but he did not attach great importance to history, science, art and literature. St. Ambrose depreciated scientific studies and wrote, “To discuss the nature and position of the earth does not help us in our hope for life to come”. St. Basil said very frankly and follishly. “It is not a matter of interest for us whether the earth is a sphere or a cylinder or disc”. Thomas Carlyle also followed the Christian tradition when he declared that he honoured only two men and no third. That the manual labour and the religious teacher. He forgot the scientist, the scholar and the artist the cynics of Greece despised education at last? Intellectuals pursuits have been neglected because: (i) they make people dwarf (ii) they make people deaf (iii) they lead people to hell A only i is correct B only ii is correct C only iii is correct D only i and ii are correct
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