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Mock Practice Test-9

Question
66 out of 80
 

Read the following informations carefully and answer these questions given below:

(i) There is a group of five persons — A, B, C, D and E.

(ii) One of them is a horticulturist, one is a physicist, one is a journalist, one is an industrialist and one is an advocate.

(iii) Three of them — A, C and advocate prefer tea to coffee and two of them — B and the journalist prefer coffee to tea.

(iv) The industrialist and D and A are friends to one another but two of these prefer coffee-to tea

(v) The horticulturist is C’s brother


Who is an industrialist?



A E

B C

C B

D D

Ans. C

Mock Practice Test-9 Flashcard List

80 flashcards
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The impact of the Industrial Revolution was a positive experience for some, but it was a time of great difficulty for others. Since the demands for reforms and protection for workers arose, unions began to be formed. That was how the evils of the Industrial Revolution were addressed in England in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Unions are voluntary associations joined by workers. The Combination Act of 1800, which hindered the growth of unions, states that the goal of every workman entering into any combination should not be obtaining an advance of wages, or to lessen or alter the hours, or influencing any other to quit his work. Any workman who did so shall be committed to jail. Although the Combination Act of 1800 prevented the growth of unions, Ralph Chaplin believed that a worker should joint the union. He stated that there can be no power greater anywhere beneath the sun, but the unions, which makes it strong. Since there were so many workers working in bad conditions, the labour laws came to action. The Health and Morals Act of 1802 limited Children under fourteen from working over twelve hours a day. The Factory Act of 1833, which enacted that no person under 18 years of age shall be allowed to work at night in machinery. It allowed the children under 18 to work less than 12 hours a day or less than 69 hours in any one week. There was a ten hours act, which said that the women or children’s workday limits are 10 hours. Socialism is one of the roles of government in the economy. Adam Smith who is the father of capitalism believes in laissez-faire (hands off) government. He believes all production should be sold at best possible lowest price. While Adam Smith believes in capitalism, Engel is criticising it. Engel believes the capitalism seizes everything for itself but the poor retain nothing. Karl Marx, the author of a 23 page pamphlet, The Communist Manifesto, and Engels recommend that all the working men of all countries should unite and overthrow all existing social conditions. Both Marx and Engel are communists, they believe in Communism. They argue that human societies have always been divided into warring classes, but everyone should be equal. The evils of the Industrial Revolution addressed in England in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries were working conditions, lack of necessities, urbanisation, and education. The working conditions were terrible so it came up with labour laws that kept workers from working all day. Labour laws were significant as A they kept workers from working all day B they protected the rights of the workers C they sought to remove the evils of the Industrial Revolution D they attempted to rectify the deplorable conditions of the workers
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The impact of the Industrial Revolution was a positive experience for some, but it was a time of great difficulty for others. Since the demands for reforms and protection for workers arose, unions began to be formed. That was how the evils of the Industrial Revolution were addressed in England in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Unions are voluntary associations joined by workers. The Combination Act of 1800, which hindered the growth of unions, states that the goal of every workman entering into any combination should not be obtaining an advance of wages, or to lessen or alter the hours, or influencing any other to quit his work. Any workman who did so shall be committed to jail. Although the Combination Act of 1800 prevented the growth of unions, Ralph Chaplin believed that a worker should joint the union. He stated that there can be no power greater anywhere beneath the sun, but the unions, which makes it strong. Since there were so many workers working in bad conditions, the labour laws came to action. The Health and Morals Act of 1802 limited Children under fourteen from working over twelve hours a day. The Factory Act of 1833, which enacted that no person under 18 years of age shall be allowed to work at night in machinery. It allowed the children under 18 to work less than 12 hours a day or less than 69 hours in any one week. There was a ten hours act, which said that the women or children’s workday limits are 10 hours. Socialism is one of the roles of government in the economy. Adam Smith who is the father of capitalism believes in laissez-faire (hands off) government. He believes all production should be sold at best possible lowest price. While Adam Smith believes in capitalism, Engel is criticising it. Engel believes the capitalism seizes everything for itself but the poor retain nothing. Karl Marx, the author of a 23 page pamphlet, The Communist Manifesto, and Engels recommend that all the working men of all countries should unite and overthrow all existing social conditions. Both Marx and Engel are communists, they believe in Communism. They argue that human societies have always been divided into warring classes, but everyone should be equal. The evils of the Industrial Revolution addressed in England in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries were working conditions, lack of necessities, urbanisation, and education. The working conditions were terrible so it came up with labour laws that kept workers from working all day. Which of the following individuals is most unlikely to support the Combination Act? A Engels B Adam Smith C Both (A) and (B) D Cannot be determined
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The impact of the Industrial Revolution was a positive experience for some, but it was a time of great difficulty for others. Since the demands for reforms and protection for workers arose, unions began to be formed. That was how the evils of the Industrial Revolution were addressed in England in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Unions are voluntary associations joined by workers. The Combination Act of 1800, which hindered the growth of unions, states that the goal of every workman entering into any combination should not be obtaining an advance of wages, or to lessen or alter the hours, or influencing any other to quit his work. Any workman who did so shall be committed to jail. Although the Combination Act of 1800 prevented the growth of unions, Ralph Chaplin believed that a worker should joint the union. He stated that there can be no power greater anywhere beneath the sun, but the unions, which makes it strong. Since there were so many workers working in bad conditions, the labour laws came to action. The Health and Morals Act of 1802 limited Children under fourteen from working over twelve hours a day. The Factory Act of 1833, which enacted that no person under 18 years of age shall be allowed to work at night in machinery. It allowed the children under 18 to work less than 12 hours a day or less than 69 hours in any one week. There was a ten hours act, which said that the women or children’s workday limits are 10 hours. Socialism is one of the roles of government in the economy. Adam Smith who is the father of capitalism believes in laissez-faire (hands off) government. He believes all production should be sold at best possible lowest price. While Adam Smith believes in capitalism, Engel is criticising it. Engel believes the capitalism seizes everything for itself but the poor retain nothing. Karl Marx, the author of a 23 page pamphlet, The Communist Manifesto, and Engels recommend that all the working men of all countries should unite and overthrow all existing social conditions. Both Marx and Engel are communists, they believe in Communism. They argue that human societies have always been divided into warring classes, but everyone should be equal. The evils of the Industrial Revolution addressed in England in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries were working conditions, lack of necessities, urbanisation, and education. The working conditions were terrible so it came up with labour laws that kept workers from working all day. Which of the following can be inferred as the feature of the Industrial Revolution? A It failed to address the demands of the workers. B It signified the burst of industrial activity. C It symbolised the victory of capitalism over socialism. D It perpetuated inequality in the society.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The impact of the Industrial Revolution was a positive experience for some, but it was a time of great difficulty for others. Since the demands for reforms and protection for workers arose, unions began to be formed. That was how the evils of the Industrial Revolution were addressed in England in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Unions are voluntary associations joined by workers. The Combination Act of 1800, which hindered the growth of unions, states that the goal of every workman entering into any combination should not be obtaining an advance of wages, or to lessen or alter the hours, or influencing any other to quit his work. Any workman who did so shall be committed to jail. Although the Combination Act of 1800 prevented the growth of unions, Ralph Chaplin believed that a worker should joint the union. He stated that there can be no power greater anywhere beneath the sun, but the unions, which makes it strong. Since there were so many workers working in bad conditions, the labour laws came to action. The Health and Morals Act of 1802 limited Children under fourteen from working over twelve hours a day. The Factory Act of 1833, which enacted that no person under 18 years of age shall be allowed to work at night in machinery. It allowed the children under 18 to work less than 12 hours a day or less than 69 hours in any one week. There was a ten hours act, which said that the women or children’s workday limits are 10 hours. Socialism is one of the roles of government in the economy. Adam Smith who is the father of capitalism believes in laissez-faire (hands off) government. He believes all production should be sold at best possible lowest price. While Adam Smith believes in capitalism, Engel is criticising it. Engel believes the capitalism seizes everything for itself but the poor retain nothing. Karl Marx, the author of a 23 page pamphlet, The Communist Manifesto, and Engels recommend that all the working men of all countries should unite and overthrow all existing social conditions. Both Marx and Engel are communists, they believe in Communism. They argue that human societies have always been divided into warring classes, but everyone should be equal. The evils of the Industrial Revolution addressed in England in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries were working conditions, lack of necessities, urbanisation, and education. The working conditions were terrible so it came up with labour laws that kept workers from working all day. The Health and Morals Act of 1802 and the Factory Act of 1833 are not likely to protect a person in which of the following instances? A a 11 years old child working for 11 hours daily B a 12 years old child working for more than 72 hours in 6 days C a 17 years old girl working on machinery at night D a 17 years old child working for 70 hours in a week
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   What carmakers often mean when they say a car is well-designed, is that it appeals to men, particularly to their less noble instinct, ‘beautiful body’. She must move like a dream. But auto-macho is going out of style. In America, 47% of new private cars are bought by women, up from 36% in 1989. Add the influence women have on a family’s car-buying, and it is probable that women are more influential overall in choosing cars than men. So, carmakers are learning to create designs that appeal to them. Women tend to buy cheaper cars, largely because working women tend to have lower income. In America, they buy 55% of the small cars, 44% of medium sized ones, but only 28% of large and luxurious models. They put more store on reliability’ than men do-probably a hidden reason for the rise in Japanese imports. American carmakers are now tailoring certain versions of their cars with women in mind. And they are learning that design can sway even normally pragmatic women, as a comparison between Ford’s Thunderbird and Mercury Cougar demonstrates. The Thunderbird is a high performance car i.e., it goes fast and is styled to look aggressive. Less than 40% of Thunderbirds are bought by women. But the same car with a more sedate body, a different name (The Cougar) and different advertising is as popular with women as it is with men. Which of the following can be inferred from the passage? A Sedate cars with different advertising register more sales B Small cars are gaining sales C Medium cars are gaining sales D Luxurious cars are not selling at all
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   What carmakers often mean when they say a car is well-designed, is that it appeals to men, particularly to their less noble instinct, ‘beautiful body’. She must move like a dream. But auto-macho is going out of style. In America, 47% of new private cars are bought by women, up from 36% in 1989. Add the influence women have on a family’s car-buying, and it is probable that women are more influential overall in choosing cars than men. So, carmakers are learning to create designs that appeal to them. Women tend to buy cheaper cars, largely because working women tend to have lower income. In America, they buy 55% of the small cars, 44% of medium sized ones, but only 28% of large and luxurious models. They put more store on reliability’ than men do-probably a hidden reason for the rise in Japanese imports. American carmakers are now tailoring certain versions of their cars with women in mind. And they are learning that design can sway even normally pragmatic women, as a comparison between Ford’s Thunderbird and Mercury Cougar demonstrates. The Thunderbird is a high performance car i.e., it goes fast and is styled to look aggressive. Less than 40% of Thunderbirds are bought by women. But the same car with a more sedate body, a different name (The Cougar) and different advertising is as popular with women as it is with men. With reference to the passage consider the following statements. 1. Women tend to buy cheaper cars, largely because working women tend to have lower income. 2. Women tend to buy cheaper cars, largely because working women are close-fisted. Which of the statements given above is/are correct? A (1) only B (2) Only C Both (1) and (2) D Neither (1) nor (2)
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   What carmakers often mean when they say a car is well-designed, is that it appeals to men, particularly to their less noble instinct, ‘beautiful body’. She must move like a dream. But auto-macho is going out of style. In America, 47% of new private cars are bought by women, up from 36% in 1989. Add the influence women have on a family’s car-buying, and it is probable that women are more influential overall in choosing cars than men. So, carmakers are learning to create designs that appeal to them. Women tend to buy cheaper cars, largely because working women tend to have lower income. In America, they buy 55% of the small cars, 44% of medium sized ones, but only 28% of large and luxurious models. They put more store on reliability’ than men do-probably a hidden reason for the rise in Japanese imports. American carmakers are now tailoring certain versions of their cars with women in mind. And they are learning that design can sway even normally pragmatic women, as a comparison between Ford’s Thunderbird and Mercury Cougar demonstrates. The Thunderbird is a high performance car i.e., it goes fast and is styled to look aggressive. Less than 40% of Thunderbirds are bought by women. But the same car with a more sedate body, a different name (The Cougar) and different advertising is as popular with women as it is with men. Which among the following factors contributes towards carmakers’ initiatives to bring out new models that appeal to females? A Females are fond of driving expensive cars. B Females influence the car-buying decisions in the family. C Females generally choose good as compared to men. D None of these
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   What carmakers often mean when they say a car is well-designed, is that it appeals to men, particularly to their less noble instinct, ‘beautiful body’. She must move like a dream. But auto-macho is going out of style. In America, 47% of new private cars are bought by women, up from 36% in 1989. Add the influence women have on a family’s car-buying, and it is probable that women are more influential overall in choosing cars than men. So, carmakers are learning to create designs that appeal to them. Women tend to buy cheaper cars, largely because working women tend to have lower income. In America, they buy 55% of the small cars, 44% of medium sized ones, but only 28% of large and luxurious models. They put more store on reliability’ than men do-probably a hidden reason for the rise in Japanese imports. American carmakers are now tailoring certain versions of their cars with women in mind. And they are learning that design can sway even normally pragmatic women, as a comparison between Ford’s Thunderbird and Mercury Cougar demonstrates. The Thunderbird is a high performance car i.e., it goes fast and is styled to look aggressive. Less than 40% of Thunderbirds are bought by women. But the same car with a more sedate body, a different name (The Cougar) and different advertising is as popular with women as it is with men. Japanese imports have risen as: A Women buy smaller cars. B Very few females buy luxurious big models and go for Japanese models. C Females give more importance to reliability. D Men prefer Japanese models more.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   With the great concern surrounding the destruction of the earth’s atmosphere due to air pollution, the immediate and direct harm caused to the human body is often overshadowed. While many are aware that our careless use of hazardous chemicals and fossil fuels may leave the planet uninhabitable in the future, most overlook the fact that they also cause real damage to our bodies at this moment. Such pollutants cause damage to our respiratory system, leading to the fluctuation of the lifespan of an individual depending on a number of conditions. Amongst these conditions are the individual’s specific geographic location, age and lifestyle. In order to understand how air pollution affects our body, you must understand exactly what this pollution is. The pollutants that harm our respiratory system are known as particulates. Particulates are the small solid particles that you can see through a ray of sunlight. They are products of incomplete combustion in engines (for example, automobile engines), road dust and wood smoke. Billions of tons of coal and oil are consumed around the world every year. When these fuels burn they release smoke and other by-products into the atmosphere. Although wind and rain occasionally wash away the smoke given off by power plants and automobiles, much still remains. Particulate matter (soot, ash, and other solids), usually consists of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide,sulphur dioxide, various nitrogen oxides, ozone, and lead. These compounds undergo a series of chemical reactions in the presence of sunlight, and the result is smog (a term used to describe a noxious mixture of fog and smoke). The process by which these pollutants harm our bodies begins by simply taking a breath. While you may see pollutants such as particulates, other harmful ones are not visible. Amongst the most dangerous to our health are carbon monoxide, the nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide and ozone. If you have ever been in an enclosed parking garage or a tunnel and felt dizzy or light-headed then you have felt the effect of carbon monoxide (CO). This odourless, colourless, but poisonous gas is produced by the incomplete burning of fossil fuels, like gasoline or diesel fuel. Which of the following questions is not answered in the passage? A What are the pollutants? B How do the pollutants affect our bodies? C How serious is the threat to our health? D What effects do pollutants have on the Earth?
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   With the great concern surrounding the destruction of the earth’s atmosphere due to air pollution, the immediate and direct harm caused to the human body is often overshadowed. While many are aware that our careless use of hazardous chemicals and fossil fuels may leave the planet uninhabitable in the future, most overlook the fact that they also cause real damage to our bodies at this moment. Such pollutants cause damage to our respiratory system, leading to the fluctuation of the lifespan of an individual depending on a number of conditions. Amongst these conditions are the individual’s specific geographic location, age and lifestyle. In order to understand how air pollution affects our body, you must understand exactly what this pollution is. The pollutants that harm our respiratory system are known as particulates. Particulates are the small solid particles that you can see through a ray of sunlight. They are products of incomplete combustion in engines (for example, automobile engines), road dust and wood smoke. Billions of tons of coal and oil are consumed around the world every year. When these fuels burn they release smoke and other by-products into the atmosphere. Although wind and rain occasionally wash away the smoke given off by power plants and automobiles, much still remains. Particulate matter (soot, ash, and other solids), usually consists of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide,sulphur dioxide, various nitrogen oxides, ozone, and lead. These compounds undergo a series of chemical reactions in the presence of sunlight, and the result is smog (a term used to describe a noxious mixture of fog and smoke). The process by which these pollutants harm our bodies begins by simply taking a breath. While you may see pollutants such as particulates, other harmful ones are not visible. Amongst the most dangerous to our health are carbon monoxide, the nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide and ozone. If you have ever been in an enclosed parking garage or a tunnel and felt dizzy or light-headed then you have felt the effect of carbon monoxide (CO). This odourless, colourless, but poisonous gas is produced by the incomplete burning of fossil fuels, like gasoline or diesel fuel. Which of the following best describes the passage? A This passage is structured as a series of relevant facts to report on the pollutants that affect our bodies. B This passage offers incisive commentary on how people continue to exploit nature. C This report details the ill-effects of our current misuse of precious natural resources on the human population. D This commentary outlines the manner in which pollutants have free run of the earth, despite all efforts by environmentalists.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   With the great concern surrounding the destruction of the earth’s atmosphere due to air pollution, the immediate and direct harm caused to the human body is often overshadowed. While many are aware that our careless use of hazardous chemicals and fossil fuels may leave the planet uninhabitable in the future, most overlook the fact that they also cause real damage to our bodies at this moment. Such pollutants cause damage to our respiratory system, leading to the fluctuation of the lifespan of an individual depending on a number of conditions. Amongst these conditions are the individual’s specific geographic location, age and lifestyle. In order to understand how air pollution affects our body, you must understand exactly what this pollution is. The pollutants that harm our respiratory system are known as particulates. Particulates are the small solid particles that you can see through a ray of sunlight. They are products of incomplete combustion in engines (for example, automobile engines), road dust and wood smoke. Billions of tons of coal and oil are consumed around the world every year. When these fuels burn they release smoke and other by-products into the atmosphere. Although wind and rain occasionally wash away the smoke given off by power plants and automobiles, much still remains. Particulate matter (soot, ash, and other solids), usually consists of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide,sulphur dioxide, various nitrogen oxides, ozone, and lead. These compounds undergo a series of chemical reactions in the presence of sunlight, and the result is smog (a term used to describe a noxious mixture of fog and smoke). The process by which these pollutants harm our bodies begins by simply taking a breath. While you may see pollutants such as particulates, other harmful ones are not visible. Amongst the most dangerous to our health are carbon monoxide, the nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide and ozone. If you have ever been in an enclosed parking garage or a tunnel and felt dizzy or light-headed then you have felt the effect of carbon monoxide (CO). This odourless, colourless, but poisonous gas is produced by the incomplete burning of fossil fuels, like gasoline or diesel fuel. Below are fours sentences that are true, false or partly true. Pick the sentence that is partly true as per the passage. A The effect of pollutants on our bodies are underestimated. B The environment can right itself given time and return to stability. C Pollutants occur in varying degrees of harmfulness. D Combustion is a major source of pollution in the atmosphere.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   With the great concern surrounding the destruction of the earth’s atmosphere due to air pollution, the immediate and direct harm caused to the human body is often overshadowed. While many are aware that our careless use of hazardous chemicals and fossil fuels may leave the planet uninhabitable in the future, most overlook the fact that they also cause real damage to our bodies at this moment. Such pollutants cause damage to our respiratory system, leading to the fluctuation of the lifespan of an individual depending on a number of conditions. Amongst these conditions are the individual’s specific geographic location, age and lifestyle. In order to understand how air pollution affects our body, you must understand exactly what this pollution is. The pollutants that harm our respiratory system are known as particulates. Particulates are the small solid particles that you can see through a ray of sunlight. They are products of incomplete combustion in engines (for example, automobile engines), road dust and wood smoke. Billions of tons of coal and oil are consumed around the world every year. When these fuels burn they release smoke and other by-products into the atmosphere. Although wind and rain occasionally wash away the smoke given off by power plants and automobiles, much still remains. Particulate matter (soot, ash, and other solids), usually consists of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide,sulphur dioxide, various nitrogen oxides, ozone, and lead. These compounds undergo a series of chemical reactions in the presence of sunlight, and the result is smog (a term used to describe a noxious mixture of fog and smoke). The process by which these pollutants harm our bodies begins by simply taking a breath. While you may see pollutants such as particulates, other harmful ones are not visible. Amongst the most dangerous to our health are carbon monoxide, the nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide and ozone. If you have ever been in an enclosed parking garage or a tunnel and felt dizzy or light-headed then you have felt the effect of carbon monoxide (CO). This odourless, colourless, but poisonous gas is produced by the incomplete burning of fossil fuels, like gasoline or diesel fuel. One cannot infer on the basis of this passage that A one needn’t be actively involved in polluting activities to suffer the effects of pollution. B one’s susceptibility to pollution is hard to define. C particulates are present everywhere there is human civilisation. D the effects of pollution on the human body are in fact greater than that on the planet.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   It was during one of the most dreadful small pox epidemics in England that Edward Jenner, a country doctor, made a discovery which was to alter the course of history. Jenner noticed that the disease seldom struck those who lived in a rural areas and worked around cattle. Most farmers and dairy workers had contracted cowpox and had recovered with nothing more serious than a pustule which left a scar. This observation led Dr. Jenner to think: why not vaccinate people with cowpox to protect them from smallpox? On May 14, 1876, Dr. Jenner took a healthy boy, James Philips, to a diary maid, Sarah Nelmes, who had a cowpox pustule on her hand resulting from an infection from her master’s cow. Dr. Jenner made two shallow cuts on James Phillips arm and inoculated them with matter taken from the cow pox sore. A pustule developed on the boy’s arm formed a scab and heated. In July of the same year. Dr. Jenner inoculated James with matter from a small pox pustule. During the next two weeks, the doctor watched for signs of small pox. They did not develop. The vaccination was successful. Dr. Jenner wrote a paper explaining his method of vaccination. At first the doctors were hostile and would not listen to a ridiculous procedure. In many towns people organized anti-vaccination campaigns. Gradually, however, the doctors and their patients accepted vaccination. The fact that Edward Jenner was a country doctor, was important in the discovery of small pox vaccine, because A he noticed that the disease was prevalent where people worked around cattle B he noticed that the disease seldom struck people who worked around the cattle C he had enough time to ____ research in the rural areas D he found that he could convince rural people more easily than city people
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   It was during one of the most dreadful small pox epidemics in England that Edward Jenner, a country doctor, made a discovery which was to alter the course of history. Jenner noticed that the disease seldom struck those who lived in a rural areas and worked around cattle. Most farmers and dairy workers had contracted cowpox and had recovered with nothing more serious than a pustule which left a scar. This observation led Dr. Jenner to think: why not vaccinate people with cowpox to protect them from smallpox? On May 14, 1876, Dr. Jenner took a healthy boy, James Philips, to a diary maid, Sarah Nelmes, who had a cowpox pustule on her hand resulting from an infection from her master’s cow. Dr. Jenner made two shallow cuts on James Phillips arm and inoculated them with matter taken from the cow pox sore. A pustule developed on the boy’s arm formed a scab and heated. In July of the same year. Dr. Jenner inoculated James with matter from a small pox pustule. During the next two weeks, the doctor watched for signs of small pox. They did not develop. The vaccination was successful. Dr. Jenner wrote a paper explaining his method of vaccination. At first the doctors were hostile and would not listen to a ridiculous procedure. In many towns people organized anti-vaccination campaigns. Gradually, however, the doctors and their patients accepted vaccination. Dr. Jenner was successful as cowpox virus produces A a mild infection in humans which is enough to produce active immunity B no infection in humans C severe infection in humans resulting in deaths D a mild infection in humans which is not enough to produce active immunity.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   It was during one of the most dreadful small pox epidemics in England that Edward Jenner, a country doctor, made a discovery which was to alter the course of history. Jenner noticed that the disease seldom struck those who lived in a rural areas and worked around cattle. Most farmers and dairy workers had contracted cowpox and had recovered with nothing more serious than a pustule which left a scar. This observation led Dr. Jenner to think: why not vaccinate people with cowpox to protect them from smallpox? On May 14, 1876, Dr. Jenner took a healthy boy, James Philips, to a diary maid, Sarah Nelmes, who had a cowpox pustule on her hand resulting from an infection from her master’s cow. Dr. Jenner made two shallow cuts on James Phillips arm and inoculated them with matter taken from the cow pox sore. A pustule developed on the boy’s arm formed a scab and heated. In July of the same year. Dr. Jenner inoculated James with matter from a small pox pustule. During the next two weeks, the doctor watched for signs of small pox. They did not develop. The vaccination was successful. Dr. Jenner wrote a paper explaining his method of vaccination. At first the doctors were hostile and would not listen to a ridiculous procedure. In many towns people organized anti-vaccination campaigns. Gradually, however, the doctors and their patients accepted vaccination. Dr. Jenner made his experiment on a healthy boy who A could not be relieved of his mark of pustule B developed the signs of pustule on his body when he was injected the matter of cowpox C died after experimentation D was paid for it
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   To a greater or less degree all the civilized communities of the modern world are made up of a small class of ruler, corrupted by too much power, and of a large class subjects, corrupted by too much passive and irresponsible obedience. Participation in a social order to this kind makes it very difficult for individuals to achieve that non attachment in the midst of activity, which is the distinguishing mark of the ideally excellent human being; and where three is not at least a considerable degree of non attachment in activity, the ideal society of the prophets cannot be realized. A desirable social order is one that delivers us from avoidable evils. A bad social order is one that leads us into temptation which if matters were more sensibly arranged, would never rise. Our present business is to discover what large scale changes are best calculated to deliver us from the evils of too much power and of too much passive and irresponsible obedience. It has been shown that the economic reforms, so dear to advanced thinker’s are not in themselves sufficient to produce desirable changes in the character of society and of the individuals composing it unless carried out by the right sort of means and in the right sort of governmental, administrative and educational contexts such reforms are either fruitless or actually fruitful of evil. In order to create the proper contexts for economic reform we must change our machinery of government, our methods of public administration, our system of education and our metaphysical and ethical beliefs. What is the inference that author derives? A Ideal society is envisaged by prophets B Changes in the character of society are necessary C It is the mark of ideally excellent human beings D None of these
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   To a greater or less degree all the civilized communities of the modern world are made up of a small class of ruler, corrupted by too much power, and of a large class subjects, corrupted by too much passive and irresponsible obedience. Participation in a social order to this kind makes it very difficult for individuals to achieve that non attachment in the midst of activity, which is the distinguishing mark of the ideally excellent human being; and where three is not at least a considerable degree of non attachment in activity, the ideal society of the prophets cannot be realized. A desirable social order is one that delivers us from avoidable evils. A bad social order is one that leads us into temptation which if matters were more sensibly arranged, would never rise. Our present business is to discover what large scale changes are best calculated to deliver us from the evils of too much power and of too much passive and irresponsible obedience. It has been shown that the economic reforms, so dear to advanced thinker’s are not in themselves sufficient to produce desirable changes in the character of society and of the individuals composing it unless carried out by the right sort of means and in the right sort of governmental, administrative and educational contexts such reforms are either fruitless or actually fruitful of evil. In order to create the proper contexts for economic reform we must change our machinery of government, our methods of public administration, our system of education and our metaphysical and ethical beliefs. The author does not say: A By participating in this kind of society one cannot remain non attached B Bad social order leads into-temptations C Subject indulge in obedience D None of these
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Some modern anthropologists hold that biological evolution has shaped not only human morphology but also human behaviour. The role those anthropologists ascribe to evolution is not of dictating the details of human behaviour but one of imposing constraints-ways of feeling, thinking, and acting that “come naturally” in archetypal situations in any culture. Our “frailties”—emotions and motives such as rage, fear, greed, gluttony, joy, lust, love—may be a very mixed assortment quality: we are, as we say, “in the grip” of them. And thus they give us our sense of constraints. Unhappily, some of those frailties our need for ever-increasing security among them are presently maladaptive. Yet beneath the overlay of cultural detail, they, too, are said to be biological in direction, and therefore as natural to us as are our appendixes. We would need to comprehend throughly their adaptive origins in order to understand how badly they guide us now. And we might then begin to resist their pressure. The author implies that control to any extent over the “frailties” that constrain our behaviour is though to presuppose A That those frailties and adaptive are recognized as currently beneficial and adaptive. B That there is little or no overlay of cultural detail that masks their true nature. C That there are cultures in which those frailties do not “come naturally” and from which such control can be learned. D A full understanding of why those frailties evolved and of how they function now.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Some modern anthropologists hold that biological evolution has shaped not only human morphology but also human behaviour. The role those anthropologists ascribe to evolution is not of dictating the details of human behaviour but one of imposing constraints-ways of feeling, thinking, and acting that “come naturally” in archetypal situations in any culture. Our “frailties”—emotions and motives such as rage, fear, greed, gluttony, joy, lust, love—may be a very mixed assortment quality: we are, as we say, “in the grip” of them. And thus they give us our sense of constraints. Unhappily, some of those frailties our need for ever-increasing security among them are presently maladaptive. Yet beneath the overlay of cultural detail, they, too, are said to be biological in direction, and therefore as natural to us as are our appendixes. We would need to comprehend throughly their adaptive origins in order to understand how badly they guide us now. And we might then begin to resist their pressure. It can be inferred that in his discussion of maladaptive frailties the author assumes that A Evolution does not favour the emergence of adaptive characteristics over the emergence of maladaptive ones B Any structure or behaviour not positively adaptive is regarded as transitory in evolutionary theory C Maladaptive characteristics, once fixed, make the emergence of other maladaptive characteristics more likely D Changes in the total human environment can outpace evolutionary change
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Some modern anthropologists hold that biological evolution has shaped not only human morphology but also human behaviour. The role those anthropologists ascribe to evolution is not of dictating the details of human behaviour but one of imposing constraints-ways of feeling, thinking, and acting that “come naturally” in archetypal situations in any culture. Our “frailties”—emotions and motives such as rage, fear, greed, gluttony, joy, lust, love—may be a very mixed assortment quality: we are, as we say, “in the grip” of them. And thus they give us our sense of constraints. Unhappily, some of those frailties our need for ever-increasing security among them are presently maladaptive. Yet beneath the overlay of cultural detail, they, too, are said to be biological in direction, and therefore as natural to us as are our appendixes. We would need to comprehend throughly their adaptive origins in order to understand how badly they guide us now. And we might then begin to resist their pressure. Which of the following most probably provides an appropriate analogy from human morphology for the “details” versus “constraints” distinction made in the passage in relation to human behaviour? A The ability of most people to see all the colours of the visible spectrum as against most people’s inability to name any but the primary colours. B The ability of some people to dive to great depths as against most people’s inability to swim long distance. C The psychological profile of those people who are able to delay gratification as against people’s inability to control their lives completely. D The greater lung capacity of mountain peoples that helps them live in oxygen-poor air as against people’s inability to fly without special apparatus.
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Given below are eight items. Each item describes a situation and is followed by four possible responses. Indicate the response you find most appropriate. Choose only one response for each item. The responses will be evaluated based on the level of appropriateness for the given situation. Suppose that there’s this really nice girl/boy that you’ve known since you were children and which you admire. More than that you feel that somewhere inside you there’s a feeling of love towards this person. You are in good relations, even though you don’t spend too much time together, though you’d wish that to happen. Every time you meet her, she smiles at you and says hi, and that’s why you sometimes get the feeling that she might also be liking you. But there are those times when you have very strong doubts about it. You see her/him hanging out with other people and apparently she acts the same like in your company. You flirt with her/him and she/he flirts back, but you don’t know whether she/he likes you or not. Suppose that finally you decide to ask her/him whether she/he wanted you to be friends. What would you do if she said no? A I would probably feel terrible about it, and try to avoid her as much as possible. B I’d tell her I’d never give up trying to be her/his friend. C That wouldn’t make me feel bad at all, I mean it’s a free world after all. D I’d probably tell her that she/he’s nice and that you are nice also and that you see no reason why two nice persons shouldn’t get together and be friends.
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