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Mock Practice Test-8

Question
71 out of 80
 

Two positions of a cube are shown below. When the number 4 will be at the bottom, then which number will come at the top?



A 3

B 5

C 6

D Cannot be determined

Ans. A

Mock Practice Test-8 Flashcard List

80 flashcards
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Few would have dreamt in their wildest dreams before the fateful May 11 and May 13, 1998 that the trundling elephant that India had all along been compared to in the western media would and could metamorphose overnight into a ferocious lion that could not only roar but charge and kill anyone daring to cast an evil eye. Few could have foretold that the five underground nuclear tests at the Pokhran range in Rajasthan in May 1998, catapulting this nation of 950 million people overnight into a superpower on its own, would send shock waves across Beijing, Islamabad, Washington, the European capitals and even Tokyo. The Buddha smiled once way back in 1974 and he smiled five times on May 11, 1998 on the Buddha Poornima Day and May 13 when India’s Prime Minister proudly announced to the nation and the rest of the world about India venturing into the exclusive club of nuclear weapon states as part of the national security shield even as he congratulated the top scientists of India over their great achievement. India is a country wedded to peace and non-violence and her great son like Lord Buddha, Ashoka and Gandhiji had been living examples to prove this gospel. But India as a self-respecting nation would not propagate the peace of the graveyard or the non-violence of the weak. It is pity that our non-violence has been mistaken by many as our weakness and many assume that India is a nation of weak-willed people. Time and again, our leaders have reminded the world community that India has an inalienable right to defend its freedom, sovereignty and its ancient heritage and that it would take appropriate measures at the appropriate time to make its defence preparedness as strong as it could. No nation needs be apologetic, if it tries its best to defend its freedom. And a nation like India that has suffered centuries of foreign subjection has every right-more than any other nation to strengthen its defence. Moreover, India cannot take any chances when it lives in a hostile nuclear, environment, with Pakistan receiving all sorts of smuggled nuclear and missile material from North Korea, China and other sources, and China itself having conducted several nuclear tests and armed herself to teeth. In times of crises, India has to fall back upon its resources to defend itself, its hard-won freedom, its economic gains and its own ancient cultural legacy. It has had three wars with Pakistan and another disastrous war with China and both the countries are still in illegal occupation of Indian territory. India hopes that the smiling Buddha on May 11, 1998 would have conveyed the right message to the right quarters that evil designs on this country would not be tolerated. It was this logic too, that prevented India from signing both NPT and CTBT-treaties that are discriminatory in nature. When present government came to power they had announced that India would go nuclear. The decision of the government to go nuclear does not emanate from any kind of jingoism or sabrerattling mentality. It arises from the supreme concern to preserve the integrity of nation described by many of the detractors as a functioning anarchy. Far from it, India has conveyed to the rest of the world that it has the best brains that can excel the best in the world. What is the passage about? A India becomes a nuclear power B Indo-Pak relations C Peaceful and non-violent policy of India D India and its neighbouring countries
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Few would have dreamt in their wildest dreams before the fateful May 11 and May 13, 1998 that the trundling elephant that India had all along been compared to in the western media would and could metamorphose overnight into a ferocious lion that could not only roar but charge and kill anyone daring to cast an evil eye. Few could have foretold that the five underground nuclear tests at the Pokhran range in Rajasthan in May 1998, catapulting this nation of 950 million people overnight into a superpower on its own, would send shock waves across Beijing, Islamabad, Washington, the European capitals and even Tokyo. The Buddha smiled once way back in 1974 and he smiled five times on May 11, 1998 on the Buddha Poornima Day and May 13 when India’s Prime Minister proudly announced to the nation and the rest of the world about India venturing into the exclusive club of nuclear weapon states as part of the national security shield even as he congratulated the top scientists of India over their great achievement. India is a country wedded to peace and non-violence and her great son like Lord Buddha, Ashoka and Gandhiji had been living examples to prove this gospel. But India as a self-respecting nation would not propagate the peace of the graveyard or the non-violence of the weak. It is pity that our non-violence has been mistaken by many as our weakness and many assume that India is a nation of weak-willed people. Time and again, our leaders have reminded the world community that India has an inalienable right to defend its freedom, sovereignty and its ancient heritage and that it would take appropriate measures at the appropriate time to make its defence preparedness as strong as it could. No nation needs be apologetic, if it tries its best to defend its freedom. And a nation like India that has suffered centuries of foreign subjection has every right-more than any other nation to strengthen its defence. Moreover, India cannot take any chances when it lives in a hostile nuclear, environment, with Pakistan receiving all sorts of smuggled nuclear and missile material from North Korea, China and other sources, and China itself having conducted several nuclear tests and armed herself to teeth. In times of crises, India has to fall back upon its resources to defend itself, its hard-won freedom, its economic gains and its own ancient cultural legacy. It has had three wars with Pakistan and another disastrous war with China and both the countries are still in illegal occupation of Indian territory. India hopes that the smiling Buddha on May 11, 1998 would have conveyed the right message to the right quarters that evil designs on this country would not be tolerated. It was this logic too, that prevented India from signing both NPT and CTBT-treaties that are discriminatory in nature. When present government came to power they had announced that India would go nuclear. The decision of the government to go nuclear does not emanate from any kind of jingoism or sabrerattling mentality. It arises from the supreme concern to preserve the integrity of nation described by many of the detractors as a functioning anarchy. Far from it, India has conveyed to the rest of the world that it has the best brains that can excel the best in the world. India’s non-violence has been mistaken for A lack of willingness to fight B others’ weakness C out weakness D our cultural legacy
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Few would have dreamt in their wildest dreams before the fateful May 11 and May 13, 1998 that the trundling elephant that India had all along been compared to in the western media would and could metamorphose overnight into a ferocious lion that could not only roar but charge and kill anyone daring to cast an evil eye. Few could have foretold that the five underground nuclear tests at the Pokhran range in Rajasthan in May 1998, catapulting this nation of 950 million people overnight into a superpower on its own, would send shock waves across Beijing, Islamabad, Washington, the European capitals and even Tokyo. The Buddha smiled once way back in 1974 and he smiled five times on May 11, 1998 on the Buddha Poornima Day and May 13 when India’s Prime Minister proudly announced to the nation and the rest of the world about India venturing into the exclusive club of nuclear weapon states as part of the national security shield even as he congratulated the top scientists of India over their great achievement. India is a country wedded to peace and non-violence and her great son like Lord Buddha, Ashoka and Gandhiji had been living examples to prove this gospel. But India as a self-respecting nation would not propagate the peace of the graveyard or the non-violence of the weak. It is pity that our non-violence has been mistaken by many as our weakness and many assume that India is a nation of weak-willed people. Time and again, our leaders have reminded the world community that India has an inalienable right to defend its freedom, sovereignty and its ancient heritage and that it would take appropriate measures at the appropriate time to make its defence preparedness as strong as it could. No nation needs be apologetic, if it tries its best to defend its freedom. And a nation like India that has suffered centuries of foreign subjection has every right-more than any other nation to strengthen its defence. Moreover, India cannot take any chances when it lives in a hostile nuclear, environment, with Pakistan receiving all sorts of smuggled nuclear and missile material from North Korea, China and other sources, and China itself having conducted several nuclear tests and armed herself to teeth. In times of crises, India has to fall back upon its resources to defend itself, its hard-won freedom, its economic gains and its own ancient cultural legacy. It has had three wars with Pakistan and another disastrous war with China and both the countries are still in illegal occupation of Indian territory. India hopes that the smiling Buddha on May 11, 1998 would have conveyed the right message to the right quarters that evil designs on this country would not be tolerated. It was this logic too, that prevented India from signing both NPT and CTBT-treaties that are discriminatory in nature. When present government came to power they had announced that India would go nuclear. The decision of the government to go nuclear does not emanate from any kind of jingoism or sabrerattling mentality. It arises from the supreme concern to preserve the integrity of nation described by many of the detractors as a functioning anarchy. Far from it, India has conveyed to the rest of the world that it has the best brains that can excel the best in the world. Decision by the government to go nuclear is because of A some kind of jingoism B sabre-rattling mentality C concern to preserve the integrity of the country D centuries of foreign subjection
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Few would have dreamt in their wildest dreams before the fateful May 11 and May 13, 1998 that the trundling elephant that India had all along been compared to in the western media would and could metamorphose overnight into a ferocious lion that could not only roar but charge and kill anyone daring to cast an evil eye. Few could have foretold that the five underground nuclear tests at the Pokhran range in Rajasthan in May 1998, catapulting this nation of 950 million people overnight into a superpower on its own, would send shock waves across Beijing, Islamabad, Washington, the European capitals and even Tokyo. The Buddha smiled once way back in 1974 and he smiled five times on May 11, 1998 on the Buddha Poornima Day and May 13 when India’s Prime Minister proudly announced to the nation and the rest of the world about India venturing into the exclusive club of nuclear weapon states as part of the national security shield even as he congratulated the top scientists of India over their great achievement. India is a country wedded to peace and non-violence and her great son like Lord Buddha, Ashoka and Gandhiji had been living examples to prove this gospel. But India as a self-respecting nation would not propagate the peace of the graveyard or the non-violence of the weak. It is pity that our non-violence has been mistaken by many as our weakness and many assume that India is a nation of weak-willed people. Time and again, our leaders have reminded the world community that India has an inalienable right to defend its freedom, sovereignty and its ancient heritage and that it would take appropriate measures at the appropriate time to make its defence preparedness as strong as it could. No nation needs be apologetic, if it tries its best to defend its freedom. And a nation like India that has suffered centuries of foreign subjection has every right-more than any other nation to strengthen its defence. Moreover, India cannot take any chances when it lives in a hostile nuclear, environment, with Pakistan receiving all sorts of smuggled nuclear and missile material from North Korea, China and other sources, and China itself having conducted several nuclear tests and armed herself to teeth. In times of crises, India has to fall back upon its resources to defend itself, its hard-won freedom, its economic gains and its own ancient cultural legacy. It has had three wars with Pakistan and another disastrous war with China and both the countries are still in illegal occupation of Indian territory. India hopes that the smiling Buddha on May 11, 1998 would have conveyed the right message to the right quarters that evil designs on this country would not be tolerated. It was this logic too, that prevented India from signing both NPT and CTBT-treaties that are discriminatory in nature. When present government came to power they had announced that India would go nuclear. The decision of the government to go nuclear does not emanate from any kind of jingoism or sabrerattling mentality. It arises from the supreme concern to preserve the integrity of nation described by many of the detractors as a functioning anarchy. Far from it, India has conveyed to the rest of the world that it has the best brains that can excel the best in the world. According to the passage, India has the right to A strengthen its defence B fight with its neighbours C be hostile D send shock waves to the world
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   India is not, as you may imagine, a distant strange, at the very utmost a curious country. India for the future belongs to Europe, it has its place in the Indo-European world, it has its place in our own history and in what is the very life of history, the history of the human mind. You know how some of the best talents and the noblest genius of our age have been devoted to the study of the development of the outward or material world, the growth of the earth, the first appearance of the living cells, their combination and differentiation leading upto the beginning of organic life, and its steady progress from the lowest to the highest stages. Is there not an ‘intellectual world’ also which has to be studied in its historical development, from the first appearance of predictive and demonstrative roots, their combination and differentiation, leading upto the beginning of rational thought in its steady progress from the lowest to the highest stages? And in that study of the history of the human mind, in that study of ourselves, of our true selves, India occupies a place second to no other country. Whatever sphere of the human mind you may select for your special study, whether it be language, or religion, or mythology, or philosophy, whether it be laws or customs, primitive art or primitive science, everywhere you have to go to India, whether you like it or not, because some of the most valuable and most instructive materials in the history of man are treasured up in India, and in India only. In what field of human endeavour has India surpassed the rest of mankind? A in materialism B in industrialization C in study of the history of the human mind D in games and sports
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   India is not, as you may imagine, a distant strange, at the very utmost a curious country. India for the future belongs to Europe, it has its place in the Indo-European world, it has its place in our own history and in what is the very life of history, the history of the human mind. You know how some of the best talents and the noblest genius of our age have been devoted to the study of the development of the outward or material world, the growth of the earth, the first appearance of the living cells, their combination and differentiation leading upto the beginning of organic life, and its steady progress from the lowest to the highest stages. Is there not an ‘intellectual world’ also which has to be studied in its historical development, from the first appearance of predictive and demonstrative roots, their combination and differentiation, leading upto the beginning of rational thought in its steady progress from the lowest to the highest stages? And in that study of the history of the human mind, in that study of ourselves, of our true selves, India occupies a place second to no other country. Whatever sphere of the human mind you may select for your special study, whether it be language, or religion, or mythology, or philosophy, whether it be laws or customs, primitive art or primitive science, everywhere you have to go to India, whether you like it or not, because some of the most valuable and most instructive materials in the history of man are treasured up in India, and in India only. What position does India occupy in the study of the history of the human mind. A First place B Third place C No place at all D Second place
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   India is not, as you may imagine, a distant strange, at the very utmost a curious country. India for the future belongs to Europe, it has its place in the Indo-European world, it has its place in our own history and in what is the very life of history, the history of the human mind. You know how some of the best talents and the noblest genius of our age have been devoted to the study of the development of the outward or material world, the growth of the earth, the first appearance of the living cells, their combination and differentiation leading upto the beginning of organic life, and its steady progress from the lowest to the highest stages. Is there not an ‘intellectual world’ also which has to be studied in its historical development, from the first appearance of predictive and demonstrative roots, their combination and differentiation, leading upto the beginning of rational thought in its steady progress from the lowest to the highest stages? And in that study of the history of the human mind, in that study of ourselves, of our true selves, India occupies a place second to no other country. Whatever sphere of the human mind you may select for your special study, whether it be language, or religion, or mythology, or philosophy, whether it be laws or customs, primitive art or primitive science, everywhere you have to go to India, whether you like it or not, because some of the most valuable and most instructive materials in the history of man are treasured up in India, and in India only. The historical development of intellectual world leads up to: A Spiritual illumination B The beginning of rational thought C Physical development D Deflation
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   From time immemorial drugs have been used by mankind for medical purposes. But never before had the abuse of narcotics caused such unprecedented world-wide concern and posed an alarming menace to the society. According to world Health organization estimates, there are over 7,50,000 heroin addicts, 4.8 million cocaine abusers of barbithrates, sedatives, and tranquilisers around the world today. Even the eastern hemisphere is no longer secure from the drug network. Drugs have scanned the planet at jet speed and proved once again that the earth is a small place in live in. The abuse of drugs is now an international problem that bothers Indians and Americans alike. Taking a drug other than for medical reasons in amount, strength, frequency or manner that damages the physical and mental functioning is drug abuse. Drug abuse is a painful problem for the addict, for his family and for all those who touch his life. It is mostly the youngster who fall prey to drugs. Adolescence is a period when many choices must be made at this stage, the youngster is especially vulnerable to pressure from friends. The future generation is virtually being crippled by the spread of drugs. Drug abusers are completely self centred and care least about others. His consciousness gets clouded, and he loses his willpower, concentration, memory and judgement capacity. When in need of money, he does not hesitate to steal or indulge in other antisocial activities. More drugs, more crime” shows the graph. A new addict develops friendships with fellow addicts and gradually enters the so-called ‘drug sub-culture’ He is then regarded as an outcast in the society, and there is little chance that he shall again lead a healthy life. Which of the following conclusions can not be drawn correctly from the passage? A Drug abusers care least for their family and the society B The number of drug abusers is increasing day by day C Takings drugs more than the required doses is called drug abuse D All drug abusers are antisocial or vice versa.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   From time immemorial drugs have been used by mankind for medical purposes. But never before had the abuse of narcotics caused such unprecedented world-wide concern and posed an alarming menace to the society. According to world Health organization estimates, there are over 7,50,000 heroin addicts, 4.8 million cocaine abusers of barbithrates, sedatives, and tranquilisers around the world today. Even the eastern hemisphere is no longer secure from the drug network. Drugs have scanned the planet at jet speed and proved once again that the earth is a small place in live in. The abuse of drugs is now an international problem that bothers Indians and Americans alike. Taking a drug other than for medical reasons in amount, strength, frequency or manner that damages the physical and mental functioning is drug abuse. Drug abuse is a painful problem for the addict, for his family and for all those who touch his life. It is mostly the youngster who fall prey to drugs. Adolescence is a period when many choices must be made at this stage, the youngster is especially vulnerable to pressure from friends. The future generation is virtually being crippled by the spread of drugs. Drug abusers are completely self centred and care least about others. His consciousness gets clouded, and he loses his willpower, concentration, memory and judgement capacity. When in need of money, he does not hesitate to steal or indulge in other antisocial activities. More drugs, more crime” shows the graph. A new addict develops friendships with fellow addicts and gradually enters the so-called ‘drug sub-culture’ He is then regarded as an outcast in the society, and there is little chance that he shall again lead a healthy life. Which of the following groups are more vulnerable to drug addiction? A The age group of 13–19 B The age group of 11–15 C The age group of 30–39 D The age group of 18–30
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Dr. S. Radhakrishnan, the illustrious philosopher statesman of India, was one of the greatest ones of our motherland. He cautioned the world against the domination of science in society. It is erroneous to claim that scientific knowledge would bring with it perpetual progress and a steady improvement in human relations. The recent period of great scientific achievements he also increased human misery: two world wars, concentration camps, atoms destruction, cold war, deadly wars in the middle east, Persian Gulf and at many other places in the world. Growth in human wisdom has not been commensurate with the increase in scientific knowledge and power. The fear of universal destruction hangs over the world. There is a feeling of disenchantment, anxiety and even despair. Science has failed to liberate man from the tyranny of his own nature. Mankind is passing through a critical period and an education of the human spirit has become essential. In order to remake society, man has to remake himself. If humanity is to survive, man must integrate his knowledge with a social responsibility. In this passage, the writer has tried to show that A Science is the only saviour that shall lead humanity forward B Science can bring about an end to all the wars C Social change comes with the government of science D Human wisdom must grow proportionately with growth of knowledge to evolve a creative integration to help mankind
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   In Asia and much of the Third World, trees are still destroyed in the old-fashioned way: they are cut down for fuel and cropland. In Europe, there is new and potentially more deadly culprit. The Germans call it “Waldsterben’, the dying forest syndrome. But the disease is far more than a German phenomenon. Since it was first observed by German scientists in the autumn of 1980, the mysterious malady has raced across Europe, blighting woods in countries as far apart as Sweden and Italy. Explanations for the epidemic range from a cyclic change in the environment to a baffling form of tree cancer. But the most convincing evidence points to air pollution. Indeed, saving the rapidly deteriorating forests of Europe will probably require a two-pronged strategy: an offensive campaign that includes the breeding of pollution-immune trees and a defensive scheme that calls for reductions in toxic emissions. But both will require more money than is currently being spent on such measures, as well as total commitment to protecting the environment. According to this passage, which one of the following statements is correct? A There is less damage in Asia than in Europe B More forests are dying in Germany than anywhere else in Europe C A cyclic change in the environment is responsible for deforestation D Air pollution is the main culprit of destroying European forests
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Read each of the following passage and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Are our universities content with merely turning out graduates whose knowledge of an alien language and efficiency in other initiative arts have roused a certain amount of good-nurtured astonishment among foreign critics? Those days of tolerant appreciation are now happily passed away. You have to pass a far severer test, and by your own work you have to win the recognition of the world. The civilized nations have in modern times made notable contribution on the world’s advancement. What new and original store have you contributed and what steps have you taken that your contributions don’t remain sporadic or uncertain? I have spoken of the new lines of investigation which have their birth in India and which will contribute materially to the intellectual advancement and further the welfare of humanity. Will these advances in various branches of science, in medicine, in agriculture and in Biophysics benefit only India or the whole world? Shall these then remain the offering of an individual worker to come to amend with him, or shall these arise a school of science to hold the need of recognition which has so hardly been won and maintain a continuous and glorious tradition of India’s gifts to the world in the realm of science. Very little serious and intelligent thought has been given to the question, which is one of the most important problems for shaping the future destiny of our country. It has been supposed that for the success of research all that is necessary less is an extensively equipped laboratory which appeals to the eye by its grandeur and cut and dried schemes for various chairs and an under haste to fill them. If display and lavish expenditure had been the sole requisite for the discoveries of lavish of nature, then Universities with their endowments exceeding millions, should have had the monopoly in scientific advance but this has no means the case. On the other hand, a Davy, a Faraday and a Rayliegh have made epoch-making discoveries within the walls if the less pretensions Royal institution and have created worthy disciples and successors. It is the man who carries the torchlight that can alone kindle other flames . It is by constant contact with the mind of his teacher that the disciple becomes inspired and shapes his future life. It is not the blaze of publicity but a sequestered life that is necessary for great scientific achievement. Once the master is found, let him have his disciples, who should be enabled to devote all their lives to the sacred cause of science. It is not pillars of granite, but aspiring and undaunted souls that are milestores which mark the advance of human knowledge. What is the purpose of the universities, according to the author? A To bring decency into man’s lives B To turnout leaders of a society C To turnout graduates with knowledge of a foreign language and other subjects D None of these
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Read each of the following passage and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Are our universities content with merely turning out graduates whose knowledge of an alien language and efficiency in other initiative arts have roused a certain amount of good-nurtured astonishment among foreign critics? Those days of tolerant appreciation are now happily passed away. You have to pass a far severer test, and by your own work you have to win the recognition of the world. The civilized nations have in modern times made notable contribution on the world’s advancement. What new and original store have you contributed and what steps have you taken that your contributions don’t remain sporadic or uncertain? I have spoken of the new lines of investigation which have their birth in India and which will contribute materially to the intellectual advancement and further the welfare of humanity. Will these advances in various branches of science, in medicine, in agriculture and in Biophysics benefit only India or the whole world? Shall these then remain the offering of an individual worker to come to amend with him, or shall these arise a school of science to hold the need of recognition which has so hardly been won and maintain a continuous and glorious tradition of India’s gifts to the world in the realm of science. Very little serious and intelligent thought has been given to the question, which is one of the most important problems for shaping the future destiny of our country. It has been supposed that for the success of research all that is necessary less is an extensively equipped laboratory which appeals to the eye by its grandeur and cut and dried schemes for various chairs and an under haste to fill them. If display and lavish expenditure had been the sole requisite for the discoveries of lavish of nature, then Universities with their endowments exceeding millions, should have had the monopoly in scientific advance but this has no means the case. On the other hand, a Davy, a Faraday and a Rayliegh have made epoch-making discoveries within the walls if the less pretensions Royal institution and have created worthy disciples and successors. It is the man who carries the torchlight that can alone kindle other flames . It is by constant contact with the mind of his teacher that the disciple becomes inspired and shapes his future life. It is not the blaze of publicity but a sequestered life that is necessary for great scientific achievement. Once the master is found, let him have his disciples, who should be enabled to devote all their lives to the sacred cause of science. It is not pillars of granite, but aspiring and undaunted souls that are milestores which mark the advance of human knowledge. How, according to the author, can one win recognition of the world? A By making progress in the intellectual field B By contributing to the welfare of humanity C By winning battles and wars D By amassing fabulous riches
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Read each of the following passage and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Are our universities content with merely turning out graduates whose knowledge of an alien language and efficiency in other initiative arts have roused a certain amount of good-nurtured astonishment among foreign critics? Those days of tolerant appreciation are now happily passed away. You have to pass a far severer test, and by your own work you have to win the recognition of the world. The civilized nations have in modern times made notable contribution on the world’s advancement. What new and original store have you contributed and what steps have you taken that your contributions don’t remain sporadic or uncertain? I have spoken of the new lines of investigation which have their birth in India and which will contribute materially to the intellectual advancement and further the welfare of humanity. Will these advances in various branches of science, in medicine, in agriculture and in Biophysics benefit only India or the whole world? Shall these then remain the offering of an individual worker to come to amend with him, or shall these arise a school of science to hold the need of recognition which has so hardly been won and maintain a continuous and glorious tradition of India’s gifts to the world in the realm of science. Very little serious and intelligent thought has been given to the question, which is one of the most important problems for shaping the future destiny of our country. It has been supposed that for the success of research all that is necessary less is an extensively equipped laboratory which appeals to the eye by its grandeur and cut and dried schemes for various chairs and an under haste to fill them. If display and lavish expenditure had been the sole requisite for the discoveries of lavish of nature, then Universities with their endowments exceeding millions, should have had the monopoly in scientific advance but this has no means the case. On the other hand, a Davy, a Faraday and a Rayliegh have made epoch-making discoveries within the walls if the less pretensions Royal institution and have created worthy disciples and successors. It is the man who carries the torchlight that can alone kindle other flames . It is by constant contact with the mind of his teacher that the disciple becomes inspired and shapes his future life. It is not the blaze of publicity but a sequestered life that is necessary for great scientific achievement. Once the master is found, let him have his disciples, who should be enabled to devote all their lives to the sacred cause of science. It is not pillars of granite, but aspiring and undaunted souls that are milestores which mark the advance of human knowledge. The author expects India A To embark upon a career of conquest and thereby glorify herself. B To maintain a continuous and glorious tradition of her gifts to the world in the reading of science C To make spiritual progress and to convey the message of spirituality to mankind D To win recognition in the international field by playing a notable role in international politics
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