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Mock Practice Test-10

Question
72 out of 80
 

Which letter will come on the blank surface of figure (iii)?



A C
B A

C D
D F

Ans. C

Mock Practice Test-10 Flashcard List

80 flashcards
1)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   There are many, of course, who desire no alternation and when it is attempted, will oppose it. They have found the existing social order profitable. They desire only such change as will insure that they are profitable in the future. There are however, others who are conscious of a desire for a new social order, but why do not grasp the implications of their desire. Unless they take the pains not only to act, but also to reflect, they will end by affecting nothing. When they desire to place economic life on a better foundation, they can only repeat, parrot-wise, the word, “Productivity”, because that is the word that rises first to their minds, regardless of the fact that productivity is the foundation on which economic life is already based. They forget that in ninetenth century which saw the greatest increase in productivity economic discontent was most acute. When they are touched by social compunction, they can think of nothing more original than the diminution of poverty. They do not understand that poverty is a symptom and a consequence of social disorder which demoralize a few by excessive riches at the same time as it demoralizes that poor by excessive poverty. “But”, they say, “increased production is important,” Of course it is—plenty is good, and scarcity evil. But plenty depends upon cooperative effort, and cooperation the ruling class and the rich despise. Yet all the time, the principles upon which industry should be based to secure plenty for all in society are simple, however difficult it may be to apply them; and if they are over looked, it is not because they are difficult, but because they are elementary. They are simple because industry is simple: in its essence, it is nothing more mysterious than a body of men associated, in various degrees of competition and cooperation, to win their livelihood by providing the community with goods and services. Whether it is agriculture or handicrafts or large and complicated enterprises like shipbuilding, its function is service, its method is association. Because its function is service, an industry has duties towards the community; it also has its own rights. Because its method is association, the different parties within it have rights and duties towards each other and the neglect or perversion of these involves oppression. The condition of a proper organization of industry is therefore permanent, unchanging and easy to understand. They are the same in all essentials in both poor and rich societies. In both it is absolutely necessary that the principles on which the economic order of society is founded should justify themselves to the conscience of decent men. The author does not say: A Social disorder results in poverty. B Increase in production depends on cooperation. C Industry cannot secure plenty for the society. D None of these
2)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   There are many, of course, who desire no alternation and when it is attempted, will oppose it. They have found the existing social order profitable. They desire only such change as will insure that they are profitable in the future. There are however, others who are conscious of a desire for a new social order, but why do not grasp the implications of their desire. Unless they take the pains not only to act, but also to reflect, they will end by affecting nothing. When they desire to place economic life on a better foundation, they can only repeat, parrot-wise, the word, “Productivity”, because that is the word that rises first to their minds, regardless of the fact that productivity is the foundation on which economic life is already based. They forget that in ninetenth century which saw the greatest increase in productivity economic discontent was most acute. When they are touched by social compunction, they can think of nothing more original than the diminution of poverty. They do not understand that poverty is a symptom and a consequence of social disorder which demoralize a few by excessive riches at the same time as it demoralizes that poor by excessive poverty. “But”, they say, “increased production is important,” Of course it is—plenty is good, and scarcity evil. But plenty depends upon cooperative effort, and cooperation the ruling class and the rich despise. Yet all the time, the principles upon which industry should be based to secure plenty for all in society are simple, however difficult it may be to apply them; and if they are over looked, it is not because they are difficult, but because they are elementary. They are simple because industry is simple: in its essence, it is nothing more mysterious than a body of men associated, in various degrees of competition and cooperation, to win their livelihood by providing the community with goods and services. Whether it is agriculture or handicrafts or large and complicated enterprises like shipbuilding, its function is service, its method is association. Because its function is service, an industry has duties towards the community; it also has its own rights. Because its method is association, the different parties within it have rights and duties towards each other and the neglect or perversion of these involves oppression. The condition of a proper organization of industry is therefore permanent, unchanging and easy to understand. They are the same in all essentials in both poor and rich societies. In both it is absolutely necessary that the principles on which the economic order of society is founded should justify themselves to the conscience of decent men. The writer is critical of A the government which does not work. B the people who do not cooperate. C those who desire for the diminution or poverty but do not know the implication. D those who do not organise industry.
3)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   There are many, of course, who desire no alternation and when it is attempted, will oppose it. They have found the existing social order profitable. They desire only such change as will insure that they are profitable in the future. There are however, others who are conscious of a desire for a new social order, but why do not grasp the implications of their desire. Unless they take the pains not only to act, but also to reflect, they will end by affecting nothing. When they desire to place economic life on a better foundation, they can only repeat, parrot-wise, the word, “Productivity”, because that is the word that rises first to their minds, regardless of the fact that productivity is the foundation on which economic life is already based. They forget that in ninetenth century which saw the greatest increase in productivity economic discontent was most acute. When they are touched by social compunction, they can think of nothing more original than the diminution of poverty. They do not understand that poverty is a symptom and a consequence of social disorder which demoralize a few by excessive riches at the same time as it demoralizes that poor by excessive poverty. “But”, they say, “increased production is important,” Of course it is—plenty is good, and scarcity evil. But plenty depends upon cooperative effort, and cooperation the ruling class and the rich despise. Yet all the time, the principles upon which industry should be based to secure plenty for all in society are simple, however difficult it may be to apply them; and if they are over looked, it is not because they are difficult, but because they are elementary. They are simple because industry is simple: in its essence, it is nothing more mysterious than a body of men associated, in various degrees of competition and cooperation, to win their livelihood by providing the community with goods and services. Whether it is agriculture or handicrafts or large and complicated enterprises like shipbuilding, its function is service, its method is association. Because its function is service, an industry has duties towards the community; it also has its own rights. Because its method is association, the different parties within it have rights and duties towards each other and the neglect or perversion of these involves oppression. The condition of a proper organization of industry is therefore permanent, unchanging and easy to understand. They are the same in all essentials in both poor and rich societies. In both it is absolutely necessary that the principles on which the economic order of society is founded should justify themselves to the conscience of decent men. The passage implies A Involvement of human beings in industry is necessary. B Social order is improper. C Economic reforms should appeal to the conscience of good people. D Economic problems cannot be studied in isolation.
4)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Coal is more abundant, but its solidity makes it less convenient to use. Traditional methods for converting coal to gases and liquids involve complex high-temperature chemical processes. Today’s cheap natural gas has made such techniques unattractive. But coal reserves could last a couple of centuries longer than gas reserves, so scientists are looking for new ways of converting coal into something more useful. One approach uses fungus. A few years ago, scientists at the University of Hartford in Connecticut found that f2 Polyporus versi-colour f1 turns leonardite, a form of brown coal, into liquid. The fungus was not so obliging with other types of coal. The process seemed to depend on using lignite that contains a lot of oxygen (leonardite is 29% oxygen by weight, compared with 20% for most American brown coals). The promising results all came from young coals, in which less of the original biology had aged into geology. Perhaps the fungus attacks ether bonds. These contain oxygen atoms, and are found in biological molecules; they tend to break down over time, meaning that older coals-and coals with less oxygen to begin with-have fewer of them. When bio-technologists think a bond is being broken, they reach for their enzymes. However, the enzyme thought to be responsible for liquefaction, laccase, turns out to be almost useless on its own. So f2 Polyporus-fl and the handful of other fungi and bacteria which have been found to liquefy coal-may be doing something rather more complicated than originally thought. The fungus’ workings are sluggish, as well as mysterious. It takes its time establishing itself on the coal before producing whatever it needs to begin its attack. Action can sometimes be seen within an hour, but complete liquefaction can take over a week. The problems have not deterred scientists at Houston Lighting &, Power Company. They envisage large lignite refineries in underground salt caverns. Ground-up lignite would be poured in, together with water and bacteria. With any luck, methane, benzene, organic acids, carbon dioxide and other useful by-products would pour out. Caves and lignite are easily found. It is proving trickier to find a bug that likes a bit of salt, does not breathe oxygen, and reliably excretes methane. The new interest in liquefaction of coal is because of the fact that A the supply of coal is abundant B liquefaction with the help of certain fungi has recently become practicable C the world has larger supplies of coal than that of other fuels D coal can be easily liquefied in underground salt caves
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Coal is more abundant, but its solidity makes it less convenient to use. Traditional methods for converting coal to gases and liquids involve complex high-temperature chemical processes. Today’s cheap natural gas has made such techniques unattractive. But coal reserves could last a couple of centuries longer than gas reserves, so scientists are looking for new ways of converting coal into something more useful. One approach uses fungus. A few years ago, scientists at the University of Hartford in Connecticut found that f2 Polyporus versi-colour f1 turns leonardite, a form of brown coal, into liquid. The fungus was not so obliging with other types of coal. The process seemed to depend on using lignite that contains a lot of oxygen (leonardite is 29% oxygen by weight, compared with 20% for most American brown coals). The promising results all came from young coals, in which less of the original biology had aged into geology. Perhaps the fungus attacks ether bonds. These contain oxygen atoms, and are found in biological molecules; they tend to break down over time, meaning that older coals-and coals with less oxygen to begin with-have fewer of them. When bio-technologists think a bond is being broken, they reach for their enzymes. However, the enzyme thought to be responsible for liquefaction, laccase, turns out to be almost useless on its own. So f2 Polyporus-fl and the handful of other fungi and bacteria which have been found to liquefy coal-may be doing something rather more complicated than originally thought. The fungus’ workings are sluggish, as well as mysterious. It takes its time establishing itself on the coal before producing whatever it needs to begin its attack. Action can sometimes be seen within an hour, but complete liquefaction can take over a week. The problems have not deterred scientists at Houston Lighting &, Power Company. They envisage large lignite refineries in underground salt caverns. Ground-up lignite would be poured in, together with water and bacteria. With any luck, methane, benzene, organic acids, carbon dioxide and other useful by-products would pour out. Caves and lignite are easily found. It is proving trickier to find a bug that likes a bit of salt, does not breathe oxygen, and reliably excretes methane. Which of the following is not necessarily one of the characteristics of an ideal fungus which can liquefy coal in viable quantities in underground salt caves? A It should tolerate salt B It should produce methane C It should act slowly D It should not breathe oxygen
6)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Coal is more abundant, but its solidity makes it less convenient to use. Traditional methods for converting coal to gases and liquids involve complex high-temperature chemical processes. Today’s cheap natural gas has made such techniques unattractive. But coal reserves could last a couple of centuries longer than gas reserves, so scientists are looking for new ways of converting coal into something more useful. One approach uses fungus. A few years ago, scientists at the University of Hartford in Connecticut found that f2 Polyporus versi-colour f1 turns leonardite, a form of brown coal, into liquid. The fungus was not so obliging with other types of coal. The process seemed to depend on using lignite that contains a lot of oxygen (leonardite is 29% oxygen by weight, compared with 20% for most American brown coals). The promising results all came from young coals, in which less of the original biology had aged into geology. Perhaps the fungus attacks ether bonds. These contain oxygen atoms, and are found in biological molecules; they tend to break down over time, meaning that older coals-and coals with less oxygen to begin with-have fewer of them. When bio-technologists think a bond is being broken, they reach for their enzymes. However, the enzyme thought to be responsible for liquefaction, laccase, turns out to be almost useless on its own. So f2 Polyporus-fl and the handful of other fungi and bacteria which have been found to liquefy coal-may be doing something rather more complicated than originally thought. The fungus’ workings are sluggish, as well as mysterious. It takes its time establishing itself on the coal before producing whatever it needs to begin its attack. Action can sometimes be seen within an hour, but complete liquefaction can take over a week. The problems have not deterred scientists at Houston Lighting &, Power Company. They envisage large lignite refineries in underground salt caverns. Ground-up lignite would be poured in, together with water and bacteria. With any luck, methane, benzene, organic acids, carbon dioxide and other useful by-products would pour out. Caves and lignite are easily found. It is proving trickier to find a bug that likes a bit of salt, does not breathe oxygen, and reliably excretes methane. Which of the following statements is not true? A The Houston Lighting and Power Company owns many underground salt caves for liquefying coal. B Ether bonds less oxygen atoms. C Coals with less oxygen cannot be liquefied with the help of fungi. D Traditional methods of liquifying coal are complex and less attractive.
7)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Coal is more abundant, but its solidity makes it less convenient to use. Traditional methods for converting coal to gases and liquids involve complex high-temperature chemical processes. Today’s cheap natural gas has made such techniques unattractive. But coal reserves could last a couple of centuries longer than gas reserves, so scientists are looking for new ways of converting coal into something more useful. One approach uses fungus. A few years ago, scientists at the University of Hartford in Connecticut found that f2 Polyporus versi-colour f1 turns leonardite, a form of brown coal, into liquid. The fungus was not so obliging with other types of coal. The process seemed to depend on using lignite that contains a lot of oxygen (leonardite is 29% oxygen by weight, compared with 20% for most American brown coals). The promising results all came from young coals, in which less of the original biology had aged into geology. Perhaps the fungus attacks ether bonds. These contain oxygen atoms, and are found in biological molecules; they tend to break down over time, meaning that older coals-and coals with less oxygen to begin with-have fewer of them. When bio-technologists think a bond is being broken, they reach for their enzymes. However, the enzyme thought to be responsible for liquefaction, laccase, turns out to be almost useless on its own. So f2 Polyporus-fl and the handful of other fungi and bacteria which have been found to liquefy coal-may be doing something rather more complicated than originally thought. The fungus’ workings are sluggish, as well as mysterious. It takes its time establishing itself on the coal before producing whatever it needs to begin its attack. Action can sometimes be seen within an hour, but complete liquefaction can take over a week. The problems have not deterred scientists at Houston Lighting &, Power Company. They envisage large lignite refineries in underground salt caverns. Ground-up lignite would be poured in, together with water and bacteria. With any luck, methane, benzene, organic acids, carbon dioxide and other useful by-products would pour out. Caves and lignite are easily found. It is proving trickier to find a bug that likes a bit of salt, does not breathe oxygen, and reliably excretes methane. During the process of converting coal into useful liquid form, young coals seemed to be an ideal choice. The reason being that: A they contain more oxygen atoms as compared to old coals B old coals have fewer oxygen atoms but more enzymes C young coals contain more enzymes D none of these
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Management is a set of processes that can keep a complicated system of people and technology running smoothly. The most important aspects of management include planning, budgeting, organizing, staffing, controlling and problem solving. Leadership is a set of processes that creates organizations in the first place or adapts them to significantly changing circumstances. Leadership defines what the future should look like, aligns people with that vision, and inspires them to make it happen despite the obstacles. This distinction is absolutely crucial for our purposes here. Successful transformation is 70 to 90 per cent leadership and only 10 to 30 per cent management. Yet for historical reasons, many organisations today don’t have much leadership. And almost everyone thinks about the problem here as one of managing change. For most of this century, as we created thousands and thousands of large organisations for the first time in human history, we didn’t have enough good managers to keep all those bureaucracies functioning. So many companies and universities developed management programmes and hundreds and thousands of people were encouraged to learn management on the job. And they did. But, people were taught little about leadership. To some degree, management was the main item on the twentieth century agenda because that’s what was needed. For every entrepreneur or business builder who was a leader, we needed hundreds of managers to run their evergrowing enterprises. Unfortunately for us today, this emphasis on management has often been institutionalized in corporate cultures that discourage employees from learning how to lead. Ironically, past success is usually the key ingredient in producing this outcome. The syndrome, as I have observed it on many occasions, goes like this: success creates some degree of marked dominance, which in turn produces much growth. After a while keeping the ever larger organisation under control becomes the primary challenge. So attention turns inward, and managerial competencies are nurtured. With a strong emphasis on management but not leadership, bureaucracy and an inward focus take over. But with continued success, the result mostly of market dominance, the problem often goes unaddressed and an unhealthy arrogance begins to evolve. All of these characteristics then make any transformation effort much more difficult. Arrogant managers can over-evaluate their current performance and competitive position, listen poorly, and learn slowly. Inwardly focussed employees can smother those who want to respond to shifting conditions. And the lack of leadership leaves no force inside these organisations to break out of the morass. Why did companies and universities develop programmes to prepare managers in large numbers? A Companies and universities wanted to generate funds through these programmes B Organisations wanted to create communication network through trained managers C Large number of organisations were created and they needed managers in good numbers D Only trained managers could lead an organisation to success
14)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Management is a set of processes that can keep a complicated system of people and technology running smoothly. The most important aspects of management include planning, budgeting, organizing, staffing, controlling and problem solving. Leadership is a set of processes that creates organizations in the first place or adapts them to significantly changing circumstances. Leadership defines what the future should look like, aligns people with that vision, and inspires them to make it happen despite the obstacles. This distinction is absolutely crucial for our purposes here. Successful transformation is 70 to 90 per cent leadership and only 10 to 30 per cent management. Yet for historical reasons, many organisations today don’t have much leadership. And almost everyone thinks about the problem here as one of managing change. For most of this century, as we created thousands and thousands of large organisations for the first time in human history, we didn’t have enough good managers to keep all those bureaucracies functioning. So many companies and universities developed management programmes and hundreds and thousands of people were encouraged to learn management on the job. And they did. But, people were taught little about leadership. To some degree, management was the main item on the twentieth century agenda because that’s what was needed. For every entrepreneur or business builder who was a leader, we needed hundreds of managers to run their evergrowing enterprises. Unfortunately for us today, this emphasis on management has often been institutionalized in corporate cultures that discourage employees from learning how to lead. Ironically, past success is usually the key ingredient in producing this outcome. The syndrome, as I have observed it on many occasions, goes like this: success creates some degree of marked dominance, which in turn produces much growth. After a while keeping the ever larger organisation under control becomes the primary challenge. So attention turns inward, and managerial competencies are nurtured. With a strong emphasis on management but not leadership, bureaucracy and an inward focus take over. But with continued success, the result mostly of market dominance, the problem often goes unaddressed and an unhealthy arrogance begins to evolve. All of these characteristics then make any transformation effort much more difficult. Arrogant managers can over-evaluate their current performance and competitive position, listen poorly, and learn slowly. Inwardly focussed employees can smother those who want to respond to shifting conditions. And the lack of leadership leaves no force inside these organisations to break out of the morass. Which of the following statements is not true according to the passage? A Bureaucratic culture smothers those who want to change conditions B Leadership involves carrying out important functions such as budgeting and planning C Pressure on managers comes mostly from within D Leadership has the potential to establish direction
15)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Management is a set of processes that can keep a complicated system of people and technology running smoothly. The most important aspects of management include planning, budgeting, organizing, staffing, controlling and problem solving. Leadership is a set of processes that creates organizations in the first place or adapts them to significantly changing circumstances. Leadership defines what the future should look like, aligns people with that vision, and inspires them to make it happen despite the obstacles. This distinction is absolutely crucial for our purposes here. Successful transformation is 70 to 90 per cent leadership and only 10 to 30 per cent management. Yet for historical reasons, many organisations today don’t have much leadership. And almost everyone thinks about the problem here as one of managing change. For most of this century, as we created thousands and thousands of large organisations for the first time in human history, we didn’t have enough good managers to keep all those bureaucracies functioning. So many companies and universities developed management programmes and hundreds and thousands of people were encouraged to learn management on the job. And they did. But, people were taught little about leadership. To some degree, management was the main item on the twentieth century agenda because that’s what was needed. For every entrepreneur or business builder who was a leader, we needed hundreds of managers to run their evergrowing enterprises. Unfortunately for us today, this emphasis on management has often been institutionalized in corporate cultures that discourage employees from learning how to lead. Ironically, past success is usually the key ingredient in producing this outcome. The syndrome, as I have observed it on many occasions, goes like this: success creates some degree of marked dominance, which in turn produces much growth. After a while keeping the ever larger organisation under control becomes the primary challenge. So attention turns inward, and managerial competencies are nurtured. With a strong emphasis on management but not leadership, bureaucracy and an inward focus take over. But with continued success, the result mostly of market dominance, the problem often goes unaddressed and an unhealthy arrogance begins to evolve. All of these characteristics then make any transformation effort much more difficult. Arrogant managers can over-evaluate their current performance and competitive position, listen poorly, and learn slowly. Inwardly focussed employees can smother those who want to respond to shifting conditions. And the lack of leadership leaves no force inside these organisations to break out of the morass. Management education was emphasized in the management programmes because: A Bmotivating employees was thought to be done by managers B organisations wanted to create a powerful guiding coalition C establishing direction was the main force of organisations D management was the main item of agenda in organisations
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Management is a set of processes that can keep a complicated system of people and technology running smoothly. The most important aspects of management include planning, budgeting, organizing, staffing, controlling and problem solving. Leadership is a set of processes that creates organizations in the first place or adapts them to significantly changing circumstances. Leadership defines what the future should look like, aligns people with that vision, and inspires them to make it happen despite the obstacles. This distinction is absolutely crucial for our purposes here. Successful transformation is 70 to 90 per cent leadership and only 10 to 30 per cent management. Yet for historical reasons, many organisations today don’t have much leadership. And almost everyone thinks about the problem here as one of managing change. For most of this century, as we created thousands and thousands of large organisations for the first time in human history, we didn’t have enough good managers to keep all those bureaucracies functioning. So many companies and universities developed management programmes and hundreds and thousands of people were encouraged to learn management on the job. And they did. But, people were taught little about leadership. To some degree, management was the main item on the twentieth century agenda because that’s what was needed. For every entrepreneur or business builder who was a leader, we needed hundreds of managers to run their evergrowing enterprises. Unfortunately for us today, this emphasis on management has often been institutionalized in corporate cultures that discourage employees from learning how to lead. Ironically, past success is usually the key ingredient in producing this outcome. The syndrome, as I have observed it on many occasions, goes like this: success creates some degree of marked dominance, which in turn produces much growth. After a while keeping the ever larger organisation under control becomes the primary challenge. So attention turns inward, and managerial competencies are nurtured. With a strong emphasis on management but not leadership, bureaucracy and an inward focus take over. But with continued success, the result mostly of market dominance, the problem often goes unaddressed and an unhealthy arrogance begins to evolve. All of these characteristics then make any transformation effort much more difficult. Arrogant managers can over-evaluate their current performance and competitive position, listen poorly, and learn slowly. Inwardly focussed employees can smother those who want to respond to shifting conditions. And the lack of leadership leaves no force inside these organisations to break out of the morass. What is the historical reason for many organisations not having leadership? A Leaders allow too much complacency in organisations B Leaders are not adept in carrying out managerial functions and organisations need good managers only C The view that leaders are born and not made D Socio-political pressure
17)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Having investigated the nature of relationship between price and trading volume for 50 India stocks, our findings indicate evidence of positive contemporaneous correlation between price changes and trading volume in Indian stocks markets. All the stocks, except Reliance Power, show asymmetric behaviour, which is in line with the research findings. Investigation of dynamic relationship between returns and trading volume shows very interesting results. We find evidence that in the Indian market, past returns cause trading volume, which can be easily conceived in an emerging market where the state of development of the market possibly does not allow instantaneous information dissemination. These results are further supported by the variance decomposition. However, in most cases the relationship lacks economic significance even though it is statistically significant. The result of impulse response analysis indicate that both returns and volume are mostly affected by their own lag and that volume is more autoregressive than returns, that is, any shock in either returns or volume does not affect the return series beyond one lag. In case of unconditional volatility and trading volume, we find a positive contemporaneous relationship between trading volume and unconditional volatility. According to the passage, the research findings show (A) positive contemporaneous relationship between trading volume and volatility (B) Reliance Power confirms the general trend (C) information is not disseminated instantaneously in the stock market A (A), (B) and (C) B (A) and (C) C (A) and (B) D (B) and (C)
18)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Having investigated the nature of relationship between price and trading volume for 50 India stocks, our findings indicate evidence of positive contemporaneous correlation between price changes and trading volume in Indian stocks markets. All the stocks, except Reliance Power, show asymmetric behaviour, which is in line with the research findings. Investigation of dynamic relationship between returns and trading volume shows very interesting results. We find evidence that in the Indian market, past returns cause trading volume, which can be easily conceived in an emerging market where the state of development of the market possibly does not allow instantaneous information dissemination. These results are further supported by the variance decomposition. However, in most cases the relationship lacks economic significance even though it is statistically significant. The result of impulse response analysis indicate that both returns and volume are mostly affected by their own lag and that volume is more autoregressive than returns, that is, any shock in either returns or volume does not affect the return series beyond one lag. In case of unconditional volatility and trading volume, we find a positive contemporaneous relationship between trading volume and unconditional volatility. It can be inferred from the passage that A the trading volume does not depend on the past returns B the trading volume largely depends on the past returns C the trading volume has no positive correlation with volatility D the trading volume depends on the variance decomposition
19)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Having investigated the nature of relationship between price and trading volume for 50 India stocks, our findings indicate evidence of positive contemporaneous correlation between price changes and trading volume in Indian stocks markets. All the stocks, except Reliance Power, show asymmetric behaviour, which is in line with the research findings. Investigation of dynamic relationship between returns and trading volume shows very interesting results. We find evidence that in the Indian market, past returns cause trading volume, which can be easily conceived in an emerging market where the state of development of the market possibly does not allow instantaneous information dissemination. These results are further supported by the variance decomposition. However, in most cases the relationship lacks economic significance even though it is statistically significant. The result of impulse response analysis indicate that both returns and volume are mostly affected by their own lag and that volume is more autoregressive than returns, that is, any shock in either returns or volume does not affect the return series beyond one lag. In case of unconditional volatility and trading volume, we find a positive contemporaneous relationship between trading volume and unconditional volatility. According to the passage, subjects that are discussed does not include A trends in returns vis-a-vis volatility B stock market losses during recession C information dissemination being slow within the market D results of the research have more of statistical significance than economic
20)
Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Having investigated the nature of relationship between price and trading volume for 50 India stocks, our findings indicate evidence of positive contemporaneous correlation between price changes and trading volume in Indian stocks markets. All the stocks, except Reliance Power, show asymmetric behaviour, which is in line with the research findings. Investigation of dynamic relationship between returns and trading volume shows very interesting results. We find evidence that in the Indian market, past returns cause trading volume, which can be easily conceived in an emerging market where the state of development of the market possibly does not allow instantaneous information dissemination. These results are further supported by the variance decomposition. However, in most cases the relationship lacks economic significance even though it is statistically significant. The result of impulse response analysis indicate that both returns and volume are mostly affected by their own lag and that volume is more autoregressive than returns, that is, any shock in either returns or volume does not affect the return series beyond one lag. In case of unconditional volatility and trading volume, we find a positive contemporaneous relationship between trading volume and unconditional volatility. According to the passage, which one of the following inferences is false? A Any shock in either returns or volume affects the return series beyond one lag. B In case of unconditional volatility and trading volume, there exists a positive contemporaneous relationship between trading volume and unconditional volatility. C Both returns and volume are mostly affected by their own lag. D The state of development of the market possibly does not allow instantaneous information dissemination.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The most important reason for this state of affairs, perhaps, is that India was the only country in the world to truly recognize the achievements of the Soviet Union-rather than merely focus on the debilitating faults that communism brought to its people. The people of India realized that the achievement of one hundred percent literacy in a country much, much larger than its own and with similarly complicated ethnic and religious groupings, the rapid industrialization of a nation that was primarily agrarian Soviet when the Bolshevik revolution took place in 1917, the attendant revolutionary steps in science and technology, the accessibility of health care (Primeval according to western standards; perhaps, but not according to Indian ones) to the general population, and despite prohibition of the government of the time the vast out pouring in literature, music, art, etc, are momentous and remarkable feats in any country. In contrast, all that the west focused on were the massive human rights violations by the Soviet state. On its people, the deliberate uprooting and mass migrations of ethnic peoples from one part of the country to another in the name of industrialization, the end of religion….in short, all the tools of information were employed to condemn the ideology of communism so much at variance with capitalist thinking. The difference with the Indian perception of thing here is, that while the Indians reacted as negatively to what the Soviet governments did to its people in the name of good governance (witness the imprisonment of Boris Pasternak and the formation of an international committee to put pressure for his release with Jawaharlal Nehru at its head), they took the pain not to condemn the people of that broad country in black and white terms; they understood that mingled in the shades of grey were grains of uniqueness (the Russians have never failed that characteristic in themselves, they have twice experimented with completely different ideologies, communism and capitalism both in the space of a century. Which of the following statements according to the passage is correct? A India seriously commended the achievement of Russia, cent per cent literacy and rapid industrialization. B India took heed on the weak faults of Russian policies and system. C The process of industrialization had already started when Russian revolution took place in 1917. D The literature, art and music received a setback during the communist regime in Russia.
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The most important reason for this state of affairs, perhaps, is that India was the only country in the world to truly recognize the achievements of the Soviet Union-rather than merely focus on the debilitating faults that communism brought to its people. The people of India realized that the achievement of one hundred percent literacy in a country much, much larger than its own and with similarly complicated ethnic and religious groupings, the rapid industrialization of a nation that was primarily agrarian Soviet when the Bolshevik revolution took place in 1917, the attendant revolutionary steps in science and technology, the accessibility of health care (Primeval according to western standards; perhaps, but not according to Indian ones) to the general population, and despite prohibition of the government of the time the vast out pouring in literature, music, art, etc, are momentous and remarkable feats in any country. In contrast, all that the west focused on were the massive human rights violations by the Soviet state. On its people, the deliberate uprooting and mass migrations of ethnic peoples from one part of the country to another in the name of industrialization, the end of religion….in short, all the tools of information were employed to condemn the ideology of communism so much at variance with capitalist thinking. The difference with the Indian perception of thing here is, that while the Indians reacted as negatively to what the Soviet governments did to its people in the name of good governance (witness the imprisonment of Boris Pasternak and the formation of an international committee to put pressure for his release with Jawaharlal Nehru at its head), they took the pain not to condemn the people of that broad country in black and white terms; they understood that mingled in the shades of grey were grains of uniqueness (the Russians have never failed that characteristic in themselves, they have twice experimented with completely different ideologies, communism and capitalism both in the space of a century. The west did not focus on: A massive human rights violation by the Soviet state on its people B rapid growth of nuclear weapons in Russia C deliberate uprooting and mass migration of ethnic people in the name of industrialization D Both (A) and (B)
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   The most important reason for this state of affairs, perhaps, is that India was the only country in the world to truly recognize the achievements of the Soviet Union-rather than merely focus on the debilitating faults that communism brought to its people. The people of India realized that the achievement of one hundred percent literacy in a country much, much larger than its own and with similarly complicated ethnic and religious groupings, the rapid industrialization of a nation that was primarily agrarian Soviet when the Bolshevik revolution took place in 1917, the attendant revolutionary steps in science and technology, the accessibility of health care (Primeval according to western standards; perhaps, but not according to Indian ones) to the general population, and despite prohibition of the government of the time the vast out pouring in literature, music, art, etc, are momentous and remarkable feats in any country. In contrast, all that the west focused on were the massive human rights violations by the Soviet state. On its people, the deliberate uprooting and mass migrations of ethnic peoples from one part of the country to another in the name of industrialization, the end of religion….in short, all the tools of information were employed to condemn the ideology of communism so much at variance with capitalist thinking. The difference with the Indian perception of thing here is, that while the Indians reacted as negatively to what the Soviet governments did to its people in the name of good governance (witness the imprisonment of Boris Pasternak and the formation of an international committee to put pressure for his release with Jawaharlal Nehru at its head), they took the pain not to condemn the people of that broad country in black and white terms; they understood that mingled in the shades of grey were grains of uniqueness (the Russians have never failed that characteristic in themselves, they have twice experimented with completely different ideologies, communism and capitalism both in the space of a century. The Indian perception of the USSR was always A neutral B negative C applauding D counter-reactionary
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   India’s role on the international stage was moulded by history rather than by the pump and circumstances of war, As a separate entity of the British empire, India became a founder member of the League of Nations in the same way as Australia and Canada, and thus acquired a somewhat unique international status long before independence. During the days of the league when India’s interests were affected, such as in matters of trade or the position of Indians overseas the Indian delegation did not hesitate to make known its independent position, for what it was worth. Some Indian delegates were in demand for chairing meetings riddled with contention and controversy, because of their reputation for impartiality and talent for mediation. These were the small beginnings of India’s later entry into the United Nations in 1945 again as a founder member before independence. The drafting of chapter IX and X of the UN Charter, which deals with international social and economic cooperation, was entrusted to a group that was presided over by an Indian. It is important however, to bear in mind that the Government of independent India had no part in the drafting of the UN charter, although it accepted the obligations contained there in. The UN was primarily the creation of three powers-the USA, UK and Russia. The size, population, resources and potential of India lent it the weight of a medium power in the functioning of the United Nations. The fact that India was among the first nations to liberate itself from the imperialist domination through non-violent means endowed it with a moral obligation to work in and outside the UN for the independence of nations still under colonial rule. India has served on the security council for 10 years of 5 terms, on the Trusteeship council for 12 years or 4 terms, on the Economic and Social council for 21 years of 7 terms. The title below that best expresses the ideas of the passage is A India and her neighbours B India’s role at the United Nations C India’s International Prestige D British Colonial Expansion
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   India’s role on the international stage was moulded by history rather than by the pump and circumstances of war, As a separate entity of the British empire, India became a founder member of the League of Nations in the same way as Australia and Canada, and thus acquired a somewhat unique international status long before independence. During the days of the league when India’s interests were affected, such as in matters of trade or the position of Indians overseas the Indian delegation did not hesitate to make known its independent position, for what it was worth. Some Indian delegates were in demand for chairing meetings riddled with contention and controversy, because of their reputation for impartiality and talent for mediation. These were the small beginnings of India’s later entry into the United Nations in 1945 again as a founder member before independence. The drafting of chapter IX and X of the UN Charter, which deals with international social and economic cooperation, was entrusted to a group that was presided over by an Indian. It is important however, to bear in mind that the Government of independent India had no part in the drafting of the UN charter, although it accepted the obligations contained there in. The UN was primarily the creation of three powers-the USA, UK and Russia. The size, population, resources and potential of India lent it the weight of a medium power in the functioning of the United Nations. The fact that India was among the first nations to liberate itself from the imperialist domination through non-violent means endowed it with a moral obligation to work in and outside the UN for the independence of nations still under colonial rule. India has served on the security council for 10 years of 5 terms, on the Trusteeship council for 12 years or 4 terms, on the Economic and Social council for 21 years of 7 terms. Though a part of the British empire, India enjoyed great prestige at the League in as much as Indian delegates were in demand for chairing meeting to consider controversial issue. It was because: (i) Indian delegates were well known for their impartiality (ii) Indian delegates had talent for mediation (iii) India was considered a power to reckon with A (i) and (iii) are correct B (i) and (ii) are correct C (i) and (iii) are correct D only (i) is correct
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   India’s role on the international stage was moulded by history rather than by the pump and circumstances of war, As a separate entity of the British empire, India became a founder member of the League of Nations in the same way as Australia and Canada, and thus acquired a somewhat unique international status long before independence. During the days of the league when India’s interests were affected, such as in matters of trade or the position of Indians overseas the Indian delegation did not hesitate to make known its independent position, for what it was worth. Some Indian delegates were in demand for chairing meetings riddled with contention and controversy, because of their reputation for impartiality and talent for mediation. These were the small beginnings of India’s later entry into the United Nations in 1945 again as a founder member before independence. The drafting of chapter IX and X of the UN Charter, which deals with international social and economic cooperation, was entrusted to a group that was presided over by an Indian. It is important however, to bear in mind that the Government of independent India had no part in the drafting of the UN charter, although it accepted the obligations contained there in. The UN was primarily the creation of three powers-the USA, UK and Russia. The size, population, resources and potential of India lent it the weight of a medium power in the functioning of the United Nations. The fact that India was among the first nations to liberate itself from the imperialist domination through non-violent means endowed it with a moral obligation to work in and outside the UN for the independence of nations still under colonial rule. India has served on the security council for 10 years of 5 terms, on the Trusteeship council for 12 years or 4 terms, on the Economic and Social council for 21 years of 7 terms. Which article of the UN charter deal with international, social and economic cooperation? A Articles VIII and XII B Articles XI and XII C Articles IX and X D Articles VI and VII
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Of the many aspects of public administration, the ethical aspect is perhaps the most important but the least codified. While administrative rule and procedures have been codified in various public documents and manuals, there is no manual for the ethics of public servants. While organisational behaviour analyses the factors which influence the behaviour of individuals in an organisation, ethics refers to those norms and standards which behaviour of the people in an organisation must conform to. While behaviour analysis deals with factual aspects, ethics relates to the normative aspects of administration. The normative aspects are of the greatest significance. Just as for an individual if character is lost, everything is lost, so also for an administration if the ethics is lost, everything is lost. Neither efficiency nor loyalty could be substitute for high ethical standards. In India, though there is not ethical code for public administrators, there are what are called, the Government Servants’ Conduct Rules. These rules lay down what constitutes misconduct for the public servants. It is apparently implied that such misconduct, which is not permitted, is also unethical conduct. As per the passage, organisational behaviour is A same as ethics in organisations B different from ethics in organisations C human behaviour in organisations including ethics D none of these
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   Of the many aspects of public administration, the ethical aspect is perhaps the most important but the least codified. While administrative rule and procedures have been codified in various public documents and manuals, there is no manual for the ethics of public servants. While organisational behaviour analyses the factors which influence the behaviour of individuals in an organisation, ethics refers to those norms and standards which behaviour of the people in an organisation must conform to. While behaviour analysis deals with factual aspects, ethics relates to the normative aspects of administration. The normative aspects are of the greatest significance. Just as for an individual if character is lost, everything is lost, so also for an administration if the ethics is lost, everything is lost. Neither efficiency nor loyalty could be substitute for high ethical standards. In India, though there is not ethical code for public administrators, there are what are called, the Government Servants’ Conduct Rules. These rules lay down what constitutes misconduct for the public servants. It is apparently implied that such misconduct, which is not permitted, is also unethical conduct. Government Servants Conduct Rules are meant for A guiding the ethical conduct of government servants B guiding what constitutes misconduct for public C guiding what constitutes misconduct for government servants D none of these
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   It is not easy to write a familiar style. Many people mistake familiar for a vulgar style, and suppose that to write without affectation is to write at random. On the contrary, there is nothing that requires more precision, and, if I may so say, purity of expression, than the style I am speaking of. It utterly rejects not only all unmeaning pomp, but all low, cant phrases, and loose, unconnected slipshod allusions. It is not to take the first word that offers, but the best word in common use; it is not to throw words together in any combinations we please, but to follow and avail ourselves of the true idiom of the language. To write a genuine, familiar or truly English style is to write as anyone would speak in common conversation who had a thorough command and choice, of words, or who discourses with ease, force, and perspicuity, setting aside all pedantic and oratorical flourishers. Or, to give another illustration, to write naturally is the same thing in regard to conversation as to read naturally is in regard to common speech. It does not follow that it is an easy thing to give the true accent and inflection to the words you utter, because you do not attempt to rise above the level of ordinary life and colloquial speaking. You do not assume, indeed, the solemnity of the pulpit, or the tone of stage declamation; neither are you at liberty to gabble on at a venture, without emphasis or discretion, or to resort to vulgar dialect or clownish pronunciation. You must steer a middle course. You are tied down to a given appropriate articulation, which is determined by the habitual associations between sense and sound, and which you can only hit by entering into the author’s meaning, as you must find the proper words and style to express yourself by fixing your thoughts on the subject you have to write about. Any one may speak out a passage with a theatrical cadence, or get upon stilts to tell his thoughts; but to write or speak with propriety and simplicity is a more difficult task. Thus, it is easy to affect a pompous style, to use a word twice as the thing you want to express; it is not so easy to pitch upon the very word that exactly fits it. Out of eight or ten words equally common, equally intelligible, with nearly equal pretensions, it is a matter of some nicety and discrimination to pick out the very one the preferableness of which is scarcely perceptible, but decisive. According to the passage A one should be permitted to speak in any way he wishes to B it is easier to write pompously than simply C the preacher is a model of good speech D a grammatical background is not necessary for good writing
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   It is not easy to write a familiar style. Many people mistake familiar for a vulgar style, and suppose that to write without affectation is to write at random. On the contrary, there is nothing that requires more precision, and, if I may so say, purity of expression, than the style I am speaking of. It utterly rejects not only all unmeaning pomp, but all low, cant phrases, and loose, unconnected slipshod allusions. It is not to take the first word that offers, but the best word in common use; it is not to throw words together in any combinations we please, but to follow and avail ourselves of the true idiom of the language. To write a genuine, familiar or truly English style is to write as anyone would speak in common conversation who had a thorough command and choice, of words, or who discourses with ease, force, and perspicuity, setting aside all pedantic and oratorical flourishers. Or, to give another illustration, to write naturally is the same thing in regard to conversation as to read naturally is in regard to common speech. It does not follow that it is an easy thing to give the true accent and inflection to the words you utter, because you do not attempt to rise above the level of ordinary life and colloquial speaking. You do not assume, indeed, the solemnity of the pulpit, or the tone of stage declamation; neither are you at liberty to gabble on at a venture, without emphasis or discretion, or to resort to vulgar dialect or clownish pronunciation. You must steer a middle course. You are tied down to a given appropriate articulation, which is determined by the habitual associations between sense and sound, and which you can only hit by entering into the author’s meaning, as you must find the proper words and style to express yourself by fixing your thoughts on the subject you have to write about. Any one may speak out a passage with a theatrical cadence, or get upon stilts to tell his thoughts; but to write or speak with propriety and simplicity is a more difficult task. Thus, it is easy to affect a pompous style, to use a word twice as the thing you want to express; it is not so easy to pitch upon the very word that exactly fits it. Out of eight or ten words equally common, equally intelligible, with nearly equal pretensions, it is a matter of some nicety and discrimination to pick out the very one the preferableness of which is scarcely perceptible, but decisive. If we were to break this selection up into two paragraph the second paragraph would best start with A “It is not to take the first word......” B “To write a genuine familiar.....” C “It does not follow that .....” D “You do not assume.....”
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   It is not easy to write a familiar style. Many people mistake familiar for a vulgar style, and suppose that to write without affectation is to write at random. On the contrary, there is nothing that requires more precision, and, if I may so say, purity of expression, than the style I am speaking of. It utterly rejects not only all unmeaning pomp, but all low, cant phrases, and loose, unconnected slipshod allusions. It is not to take the first word that offers, but the best word in common use; it is not to throw words together in any combinations we please, but to follow and avail ourselves of the true idiom of the language. To write a genuine, familiar or truly English style is to write as anyone would speak in common conversation who had a thorough command and choice, of words, or who discourses with ease, force, and perspicuity, setting aside all pedantic and oratorical flourishers. Or, to give another illustration, to write naturally is the same thing in regard to conversation as to read naturally is in regard to common speech. It does not follow that it is an easy thing to give the true accent and inflection to the words you utter, because you do not attempt to rise above the level of ordinary life and colloquial speaking. You do not assume, indeed, the solemnity of the pulpit, or the tone of stage declamation; neither are you at liberty to gabble on at a venture, without emphasis or discretion, or to resort to vulgar dialect or clownish pronunciation. You must steer a middle course. You are tied down to a given appropriate articulation, which is determined by the habitual associations between sense and sound, and which you can only hit by entering into the author’s meaning, as you must find the proper words and style to express yourself by fixing your thoughts on the subject you have to write about. Any one may speak out a passage with a theatrical cadence, or get upon stilts to tell his thoughts; but to write or speak with propriety and simplicity is a more difficult task. Thus, it is easy to affect a pompous style, to use a word twice as the thing you want to express; it is not so easy to pitch upon the very word that exactly fits it. Out of eight or ten words equally common, equally intelligible, with nearly equal pretensions, it is a matter of some nicety and discrimination to pick out the very one the preferableness of which is scarcely perceptible, but decisive. When the writer says, “You must steer a middle course he means that A You should speak neither too loudly nor too softly B You should speak neither too formally nor to colloquially C you should write as well as speak D you should not come to any definite conclusion about what is proper or not proper in speech
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Read each of the following passages and answer the items that follow. Your answers to these items should be based on the passages only.   It is not easy to write a familiar style. Many people mistake familiar for a vulgar style, and suppose that to write without affectation is to write at random. On the contrary, there is nothing that requires more precision, and, if I may so say, purity of expression, than the style I am speaking of. It utterly rejects not only all unmeaning pomp, but all low, cant phrases, and loose, unconnected slipshod allusions. It is not to take the first word that offers, but the best word in common use; it is not to throw words together in any combinations we please, but to follow and avail ourselves of the true idiom of the language. To write a genuine, familiar or truly English style is to write as anyone would speak in common conversation who had a thorough command and choice, of words, or who discourses with ease, force, and perspicuity, setting aside all pedantic and oratorical flourishers. Or, to give another illustration, to write naturally is the same thing in regard to conversation as to read naturally is in regard to common speech. It does not follow that it is an easy thing to give the true accent and inflection to the words you utter, because you do not attempt to rise above the level of ordinary life and colloquial speaking. You do not assume, indeed, the solemnity of the pulpit, or the tone of stage declamation; neither are you at liberty to gabble on at a venture, without emphasis or discretion, or to resort to vulgar dialect or clownish pronunciation. You must steer a middle course. You are tied down to a given appropriate articulation, which is determined by the habitual associations between sense and sound, and which you can only hit by entering into the author’s meaning, as you must find the proper words and style to express yourself by fixing your thoughts on the subject you have to write about. Any one may speak out a passage with a theatrical cadence, or get upon stilts to tell his thoughts; but to write or speak with propriety and simplicity is a more difficult task. Thus, it is easy to affect a pompous style, to use a word twice as the thing you want to express; it is not so easy to pitch upon the very word that exactly fits it. Out of eight or ten words equally common, equally intelligible, with nearly equal pretensions, it is a matter of some nicety and discrimination to pick out the very one the preferableness of which is scarcely perceptible, but decisive. The author mentions all of the following as important to good speech, except A a good command of English vocabulary B the use of allusions and metaphors C straightforward and precise delivery D the placing of emphasis on important words and phrases
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Given below are eight items. Each item describes a situation and is followed by four possible responses. Indicate the response you find most appropriate. Choose only one response for each item. The responses will be evaluated based on the level of appropriateness for the given situation. Suppose you are hired as an operator at a cost-free telephone number where people call to get advice and counseling. Hundreds of people dial this number every day looking for support and you have to be there for each of them doing your best and helping whenever possible. Some of them are people who are just bored and are looking for fun, some of them are having problems with their friends, some of them feel like talking about politics and laws, and last, but not least there are the category called “the old people”. These are people who have passed a certain age, people who feel abandoned and neglected, people who really haven’t got somebody close to talk to. For these people, the telephone is their only mean of communication to the world, the only world they know at their age. Every problem they have must be your problem also, you must get involved in it, and do whatever possible to help them. Suppose you have been working in this field for 15 years. You have a lot of experience, you’ve seen a lot and given advices for as far as you can remember. Now that you have such great experience in this field, can you please tell me why are these people neglected? A Young people in general don’t spend too much time with older people because there’s no way they can have fun in their presence. Older people are a bit slower due to their advanced age and one has to have great patience when dealing with them, which is not fun. B Young people don’t like older people because they don’t like being reminded that they will be old too. C Young people are too busy with their own life, their children and their businesses and therefore have no real time for sparing some attention to older people. D Young people hate old generation.
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