Loading....
Coupon Accepted Successfully!

 

Model Interviews 3

Mr Sunil Bedi, who is a first class MA in political science and is at present doing his MBA, reaches the venue of the interview half-an-hour early and meets other candidates.
Sunil
Good morning, friends, I am Sunil Bedi. I can make out that we are all here for the same purpose. May I also join your company and share your views?
Sanjay
Yes, friend, you are most welcome to join us. I am ­Sanjay Gupta. We are discussing the recent elections in Punjab. Do you have any views on this subject?
Sunil
Sure, I will come to that; but Sanjay, you have not ­introduced your other friends sitting here.
Sanjay
Oh yes, I am sorry. You see, on my right is Narendra Sahani and on my left is Ravinder Pathak.
Sunil
(Meets both Narendra and Ravinder and inquires about their qualifications and also whether this is their first chance to be interviewed) Yes, we now know each other and can discuss the issue. As far as I have read in the newspapers, I can only say that it is good to have elections and have a democratically elected ­government which is certainly better than the ­Presidential rule. However, a majority of the people boycotted these elections either out of fear or other ­political reasons, and as such we cannot call it a ­popular ­government.
Sanjay
You are right. That’s what we were also discussing.
 
(In the meantime a peon comes to escort Sunil to the interview hall and calls out his roll number and name. Sunil quickly gets up saying) Friends, excuse me. We shall meet again. Let me see how my interview goes.
Sanjay
Sunil, we wish you the best of luck.
Sunil
Thank you, friends.
 
(Sunil leaves the company of his newly made friends and walks towards the interview hall. He opens the door and says) May I come in, please?
Chairman
Yes, Mr Sunil Bedi, you may come in and take your chair.
Sunil
(Walks in with confidence and with a smile on his face says) Good morning to you all, sir. (He then pulls the chair and sits down saying) Thank you, sir.
Chairman
Before we start, please tell us whether we should call you Sunil or Sunil Bedi, or Mr Bedi?
Sunil
Sir, you may call me Sunil as it is my first name.
Chairman
I note from your dossier that you have done a post-graduation in political science. I think political science is a subject for politicians. I wonder how it is going to help you in your career as an IAS officer.
Sunil
Sir, no doubt it would be good if our politicians studied political science, but to say that it is a subject ­exclusively for them is not correct in my opinion. In fact, every ­citizen of India must have some knowledge of political science and to an administrator it is of very great help. By studying political science, one can ­understand the finer details of the Constitution, various political institutions and the systems of ­governments, and how they work in other places.
 
 
An administrator has to play a vital role in the implementation of various government plans and related ­programmes. If he is aware of what is meant by a ­welfare state, socialism, democracy, fundamental rights and duties of citizens, the directive principles and others, it would certainly help him in his administrative work. As a student of political science one not only studies the workings of one’s own Constitution but also how they work in other democracies. Based on this, I think you will appreciate that the study of this subject would be very useful to an ­administrator. Therefore, though not a subject exclusively for the politicians, political science could definitely help our ­politicians and remove some of the political problems being created by them.
Chairman
Well, you have given a satisfactory explanation, but I don’t think that to become an efficient administrator one has to study this subject in college. I have seen several commerce and science graduates become ­efficient administrators.
Sunil
Thank you for the compliment, sir, and I agree that one can be a good administrator even if one has not ­studied political science.
Member 1 :
Sunil, your interest in political science is indicative that you are preparing to become a politician yourself one day. Is it true?
Sunil
Sir, I am sorry if I have given you this impression. In fact, 
I have never aspired to be a politician because to become a politician you require several other qualities which a ­person of my means and resources cannot ­afford.
Member 2
Why, what’s wrong in becoming a politician in a ­democracy? See the respect and authority they command.
Sunil
Sir, I hate the term politician. I would rather be a statesman than a politician, but these days we have far more politicians than statesmen. Sir, the politicians and their parties work only to create vote banks and win elections to capture power. They exploit our illiterate citizens and poor minority communities on the ­basis of religion, caste, community, language and what not, to achieve their own selfish motives. Sir, this is the concept of politicians in my mind and therefore, I have never aspired, and I don’t think will ever aspire, to be a politician.
Chairman
But don’t forget that as an IAS officer you have to deal with politicians. If you have such a poor impression about them, I am afraid, you will always be in the midst of ­contradiction and controversy.
 
Sunil
To some extent, yes. However, sir, if the politicians and political parties with whom I may have to deal have the right constitutional approach and work within the constitutional framework, I am sure I will be able to get along with them very smoothly.
Chairman
Good. Your approach is fine.
Sunil
Thanks for the compliment, sir.
Member 3
Could you please tell us what you understand by the term sovereignty ?
Sunil
Sir, sovereignty implies a state with an internal ­authority which is supreme and independent of all external control, or we can say that it is the supreme political power to ­govern a state without external control.
Chairman
Recently there have been allegations from certain states that Hindi is being imposed upon them ­indirectly through TV serials. What do you have to say about this?
 
Sunil
Sir, I would say that to some extent these allegations are correct. TV relay centres all over the country are hooked up most of the time to the national ­network. Hence people have no choice but to watch and ­listen to only Hindi serials. I think it would be better if ­people sitting in remote villages get the opportunity to watch and enjoy TV programmes relayed in their own ­languages.
Chairman
This shows that you are in favour of linguistic division of the country. What solutions would you offer to the language problem in the country?
Sunil
Sir, again I am sorry if I have given you a wrong ­impression. I must stress that I am against any ­linguistic division of the country. As far as offering a solution to the language problem is concerned, I am of the opinion that English should be taught in all states as it is an international language which is essential for our technological and scientific advancement and also for international communication. I also feel that English is more easily accepted by a majority of Indians as compared to Hindi or any other regional language. The regional languages must continue to be used within the states which would facilitate adult education in our literacy drive mission, and the combined use of English will facilitate day-to-day administrative functioning. Let Hindi be our national language and the regional languages must continue along with English in their respective states.
Member
Why are you against the linguistic division of the ­country?
Sunil
Sir, the problems being faced at present in India are mostly due to the fact that we have created several states on a linguistic basis. This basis has given the politicians ample opportunity to exploit people. Sir, you will recall that before Independence, India had hardly eight or nine provinces which were multilingual, multiracial and multicultural, and yet they were well managed. Now we have divided the country into 25 states on the basis of language and this is the root of many of our problems.
Chairman
How do you propose to contain these political problems which stem from the diversity in languages, ­religions, communities and so on?
Sunil
Sir, instead of having so many states, I feel it would be better to make administrative zones or divisions which may be easily managed without regard to languages, ­religions or communities. Let each zone be multilingual, multiracial and multireligious which would not be so easily exploited by the politicians as is the case now.
Chairman
From the administrative point of view, I agree with you. However, such a situation is not feasible.
Sunil
Thank you, sir.
Chairman
Before we finish, please tell us what you do in your spare time. Do you have any specific hobby?
 
Sunil
Sir, in fact, I have very little spare time. However, if I find a spare moment, I read various magazines like India Today, Sunday and others to keep myself abreast with the latest national and international developments.
Chairman
(asks the members) Do you have anything else to ask Mr Bedi?
Member
No, we think that’s all. (Sunil does not get up. He keeps sitting and waits for the chairman’s instructions.)
Chairman
All right Mr Bedi, we think this is enough. You have done well.
Sunil
(Gets up, saying) Thank you very much for the ­compliments and fruitful discussions we have had. Thank you, sir.




Test Your Skills Now!
Take a Quiz now
Reviewer Name